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.._-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OR,…

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CAUGHT AT LAST; OR, THE FELON'S BRAND. RALL RIGII'rg RISURVXD-],, CHAPTER XIX. TACTICS. I* was a curious circumstance that from the day when JRaymond White bad his explanation with M. Par- landet, that worthy gentleman's behaviour towards tais subordinate manifestly changed. Up to that period It bad not been always pleasant, varying from open Insolence to mock civility, alternated with a little ,sarcasm and various petty-minded sneers, often before Van Flewker at M. Vhite's conscientious scruples. The episode of the lottery tickets was one Parl was particularly fond of recalling, dragging it in by bead and shoulders, in and out of season, until Raymond fairly hated the sound of the words. Now the tables were turned, M. Vhite was everything with Parl. He was loud in his praises to the clerks in the City of Raymond's foresight and business capacity. It was Incredible, he declared, how much he was indebted to the shrewdness of M. Vhite in the performance of his arduous duties. He could not conceive how it was possible for him to have done without that shrewd- ness before. Even to the merchant, in one of his lucid intervals—and there were times whenParlandet found it advisab!e to put forward a sensible and prac- ticable idea-he took occasion to state that for the plan of a certain operation, which proved successful, lie had been mainly indebted to the able assistance of that dear M. Raymond Vhite. Whereat Mynheer Fabian van Flewker opened his eyes a little wider than usual, whistled gently, but said nothing. M. Parlandet's suddenly conceived attachment for Jjis junior proceeded to such lengths, as to become almost embarrassing to its object. He displayed the utmost interest in the state of Raymond's health, was pissiduous in anxious inquiry into the condition of his 61, cold, tenderly attentive and solicitous as to the progress of his headache or his cough. But his most effectual means ot obliterating the unfavourable im- pression his cunning told him by Raymond felt, and of arousing a certain degree of interest in his Msistant's breast was of a far more artful kind. About this period M. Parlandet was, as he stated, jproitten with remorse for the errors of his mis-spent Career, and overcome fey a vehement desire to enter upon a better course. Who so well calculated to assist ihim in this laudable endeavour as that dear young friend who was a shining example of the beauties of ^'blameless life ? Might he not beg the co-operation of that valued friend in the path of reform upon Which he was steadfastly resolved to enter ? Now Raymond was not credulous, and it is only fair to state that he certainly did look upon his chief's fudden conversion with a suspicious eye. But there iIJ an astonishing attraction in proselytism; and artful M. Parlandet, knowing this, assailed his enemy upon J the weakest side. The more honourable and con- jfoientious a man, the more is he liable to fall before these tactics. So hard it is adequately to judge another's heart—so terrible would be the self-reproach Of him who should reflect that he might have saved an erring fellow, if he had not denied help pitifully graved, tnat I think few good men would care to go through life with such a weight upon their souls. Raymond, at any rate, did not feel himself justified In refusing the assistance M. Parlandet vociferously Maimed. To the best of his ability, he modestly and humbly endeavoured to remove the doubts Parl professed himself to feel, and did, it must be admitted, ex prience a certain glow of satisfaction when, after due (deliberation, his disciple professed himself entirely convinced by the arguments of his instructor. It Was an error incident to a simple, honest, genuine pature, and I do not feel called apbn to excuse him for being taken in. Cunningly, warily, the arch-hypocrite played the part he bad set himself to carry through. He reformed pis manners, he amended his language ostensibly, at least, he changed his vicious course of life. You must Dot suppose that M. Parlandet was by any meaas so bungling a practitioner as to fall into the mistake of rendering the change abrupt, and therefore suspicious. Gradually, in the lapse of weeks, conviction appeared to steal upon his mind. He had even, as he averred, any a struggle to sustain with ancient habits and predilections the indifference of years was difficult to overcome; it was hard to contend against the Irishes and desires of a sinful heart. In time, how- ever, he trusted to be able to make more earnest efforts in the good cause; and, in the meantime, Nothing would afford him so much comfort and con- ization as the privilege of receiving his dear young friend's assistance and advice. It is an old, old story, and has been often acted out before—the tale of a corrupt and astute intellect play- ing upon a noble, generous mind for a sinister pur- pose. Though failing sometimes, the artifice has fre- quently succeeded. It succeeds now, but the end is #ot yet. The period occupied by M. Parlandet's penitence brought the winter to a close, and carried the actors to this little history far into the spring. May setting In unusually warm and fine, Gertrude van Flewker brought into execution her little plot for inducing her father to take a house some distance out of town. The merchant selecte i a cottage near Richmond, close -by the river side as the place of their abode. It was §, comfortable house, imbedded in flowers, with roses agd honeysuckle trained against the front; well fur- pished, and an easy distance from the station. Thither the family removed, and there the merchant's daughter expected to realise the summer's dream. CHAPTER XX. TOUCHING THE FLIGHT OF AN OFFICE RULER AND ITS RESULTS. THE ordinary monthly sitting of the Tobacco Par- rent" had just occurred in Augustine Close— the congress of the republican firm of Fabian van JPlewker and Company. As usual, all the employes pf the merchant had participated; all had discussed the position of the business; all had freely given their opinions upon the measures to be adopted juring the ensuing month. Van Flewker alone, as was his custom, sat still and silent, hearing much and joying little, until the council was at an end. M. Farlandet was still closeted with his chief; the clerks bAd returned to the front office, and were yet dis- coursing of what had just occurred. Pordy," said Eleckser, suddenly interrupting- an floquent speech of Gwillim. Vhere's that Bill ? leetle rMCtJ OS to de pump for some vater. De .¡, got into my tt114 maje

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.._-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OR,…

.._-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OR,…