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.G AT LAST; OR, THE FELON'S…

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G AT LAST; OR, THE FELON'S BRAND. [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. J CHAPTER IX.-(Continued.) The man who had just appled to Monsieur Pith for employment was seated at a table in the only ah&ir the room contained. Before him lay his cross, |iie medals and a pistol. The soldier's head wae leaning upon his hands, and he was earnestly regard- tog the object upon the table. Owing to his position, I be was unable to perceive the watcher at the door of I lais room. 41 It is hard it is hard!" Monsieur Pith at last beard him say, with a bitter sigh. For a fortnight I I have striven for an opportunity to gain a living by honest toil. I have been repulsed by my country- men I have been humiliated by the foreigner. They Will not let me live. Well! I have looked Death too I )ften in the face to fear him now and I will die The listener had stolen gradually into the room as Parlandet spake, and stood now behind his chair. Unconscious of the presence of any living soul, the ax-grenadier raised his head from his hands, took up the pistol, cocked it, deliberately placed the muzzle against his temple, and was in the act of pressing the trigger, when the weapon was struck up from behind. Another half second would have been too late. As it was, a tongue of flame swept harmlessly over Parlandet's head, singeing his hair and scorching his forehead with its fiery breath. The charge lodged With a crash in the ceiling. Turning in amazement to see whose was the hand that still grasped his I pistol, for the second time within half an hour, the p-grenadier gazed full into the eyes of Monsieur Pith. The two men stood face to face, each holding the discharged, skill smoking arm. Man man I" exclaimed the startled printer. How can you dure commit this cowardly sine What! ft sold it-r, and afruid "I owardly! ah-ciid!' panted Jean. "Englishman, eware I repeat my wopds," reiterated dauntless Mon- sieur Pith. "Kune but a coward attempts to fly from the ills of life, however hard to bear, and rush onsuminoned into the presence of his Maker. None but a man who is afraid to tace his troubles courts a Wanton death." This was a view of the subject so entirely new to Jean, that he positively si\g»ered. He had never regarded the question in this light before. To his benighted mind it had iipjJMJ (1 that the choice lay pnly between ckath arm die-Honour, and he had thought it an act ot virtue to profer the first. The prejudices of a life were not tht's easily to be over- oome. Though shaken by the words of Monsieur Pith, he would not yield without a struggle. J Ah, monMeur responded Jean. It is an easy thing for you to reason .-0— 3 011 whose life is probably scene of ease and comfort, at aiiv ratt) of hope. Jiut for me, why should X ll\e:- I cannot obvttin employ- j lpent. I will neither beg nor exist upon m Da. Honour forbids me to subsist, by fraud. There is nothing left for me 1.1.1, to die. Give me the pistol, monsieur; and leave me to my fate. "If I uo," said sturdy Monsieur Pith, "may I be hanged!" Monsieur Pith's sincerity must plead his excuse for )1is ill-breeding. That iu. was in earnest was very joon shown. He slipped the pistol into his pocket, ipoke a few hearty sentences to Jean, which etIecttd p, marvellous change 1'1' the better in the reckless fellow's physiognomy, and carried him away upon the pletant to his office in the Street of Peace. Arrived there, Monsieur Pith delivered over the captive to the pharge,of his overseer, who provided the ex-grenadier with the Jong-sought occupation. It was hard for Jean to tend his horny fingers- Itiffened to iron by long years of cairying the musket -to the 111"k of picking up those tiny leaden im-ssen- (prs, which, arranged in words, are more effectual in spreading peace *nd goodwill between the nations than tons of t ho-e, other leaden missiles Jean had t C, 1, been employed in sending among his fellows. Yet he was not le, zi, I-i- ii(jav tliati tti(-ri; ai:id Nvitli all due deference to the profession of arms, I venture to Relieve a Cur more useful one. Unlisted in the ranks pf that great armv of the Press, which wages con- stant war against the grand mischief-maker— Ignornnee, with her noisesome brood of Bigotry, Intolerance, Superstition, and tiionsands of their 5 wicked kin, his labours were directed now to the enlightenment of human minds, which is surely better service to the common cause than the ferocious jnutilation of human bodies. Difriciilt, as tile tisk m-as, at his time Of life, to turn to another mode of gaining bread, honest Jean persevered manfully, until he had ac- ?[Hired at least a decent proficiency in his art. For ull two years he laboured on untiringly in the work- fhop of Monsieur Pith. Then came a change. r pan the same landing of the house as that upon which Jean resided there lived 9. widow and her daughter. Madame Dumont Waar ithe relict, of a captain siain at Water- too, In;¡]n whom he had served. The grenadier knew tll,if these poor ladies were sorely put to it to earn their bread. A little casual embroidery work Wes almost their only resource. Honest Jean was in the habit of rendering them such trifling service and assistance as they would accept. But the pride of gentle nurture is very great.—especially when attended by the bitter consciousness of grinding want-and Jean's good ofOces were principally confined to fetch- ing water and fuel, or executing small commissions for Mademoiselle Louise. Once, indeed, he bad ven- tured to hint that better food and warmer raiment Irould not be undesirable for both, but the quiet assent of Madame Dumont, and the mournful and decided air with which site instantly changed the fubject, had warned him this was dangerous ground. Strange to say, however, with all this humility of spirit, with all this knowledge of the immeasurable gulf between himself, the humble, unlettered, private, and the daughter of his dead officer, Jean Parlandet yet dared to nourish in his heart of hearts a secret passion for Mademoiselle Louise. He scarcely ventured to confess it even to himself as he lay upon bis hard, narrow couch at night, and in the dark, with no eye to read his countenance. In vain he Called himself in spirit all the uncomplimentary jwmes yet in his recollection from the not over-choice fegimental vocabulary. In vain he recalled to mind aIaat he was old enough ty be Louise's father, In yajn 0,

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CHAPTER X.

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.G AT LAST; OR, THE FELON'S…

.G AT LAST; OR, THE FELON'S…