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--=-=-== CAUGHT AT LAST; OR, THE FELON'S BRAND. [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER VIII. M. PARLANDET'S GRAND IDEA. s, for a time, the matter ended. The clerks and Parl re-lighted their cigars, which had gone out during the little excitement. The merchant-seasoned Old smoker !-had puffed away as steadily as ever throughout the colloquy. They ranged themselves ground the desk again, and the business of the council le,commenced. "Nothing new from Italy," observed Van Flewker. « De siege of G-aeta continues. Garibaldi is still in Naples, waiting to surrender de Governmentto Victor Bmipajiual. Keported he will return to Caprera. Is 9&id to have refused a pension, and to be heavily in jebt.. What opportunities dat man has trown away fhjlphur rising. Have we done anyting in sulphur, btely, Meestare Vhiffie." 41 Very little, sir," returned the cashier. » M. van Flewker !here broke in Pari, excitedly l' J have idea.; magnificent, superb! It occur to me. tome days ago, but I forget to tell you at the time, and it go gradually out of my head. Now, see what wonderful thing is that association of ideas! By the fimple mention of von leetel word, I sulphur,' it all rush back again in one big volume, like the roar of a Cataract. Aha exclaimed M. I'arlandet, pressing his hands upon lÚs large rfd ears, and dancing about the room in transport, what mighty flood of grand impressions rush upon my brain! My honoured patron, I congratulate you. The philosopher's stone of the nineteenth century is lie at your feet, and only wait for you to pick him up." "Let us hear your idea, M. FarlandRt," returned the merchant, leaning calmly back in his chair, and looking hxedly at the manager. M. van Flewker," re-commenced Pari, in his native tongue, plain Saxon being not enough tor his present geeds, that which I have now to propose is opera- tion of the most serious. It involves-ali rather, what does it not involve ? The penetrated genius of my most honoured patron alone is capable to execute pay plan. There lives upon this earth but one man competent to carry it to a conclusion the most sue, cossful., Who can he be but the very honoured and ipuch distinguished Monsieur Fabian van Flewker Here M. Parlandet performed his lowest bow. "Well, M. Parlandet," remarked the merchant, « come to the point, if you please, and favour me with your idea." He was not averse to receiving this coarse flattery even from Parlandet, and in the presence of his clerks. Indeed, he rather liked them to hear it than other- wise. As, proverbially, if a man be plentifully be- spattered with mud, some of it is sure to stick, so Van Flewker believed that M. Parlandet's incessant ;cu laudatiori of his talents and perspicuity could not but p,ve tfle effect, in time, of producing a salutary jeyerence an" awe in the auditor's minds. "Ah! but it is keen, this intellect exclaimed Pari, addressing the ceiling. It is subtle, refined, fcut cutting, like—like—like a stiletto with von double edge M. Parlandet felt rather at a loss for a simtle bere. As he never shaved, probably the stock com- parison of sharp as a razor," did not,enter his mind. I dare say, therefore, he spoke of an instrument more familiar to his hand. M. Fabian van Flewker, I pray you, listen Some nights ago, lying awake upon my humble pallet, revolving as of habitude, in my active brain a variety of projects, all tending to promote the interests of this illustrious house, and the prosperity of its munificent head, sudden, as by a flash of lightning, Inspiration darted into my soul!" Inspiration, in this instance, was represented by a (Surfeit of pork chops, fried potatoes, cucumber salad, jndijBurton ale, a supper of which the manager was inordinately fond. 41 What do I ?" continued M. Parlandet. I throw pff the coverlet—I rise-I perambulate the room, my great idea working, boiling, fermenting like a barrel of yeast in my soul. In vain I essay to cool the agitation of my blood. I seize the water-flask. Horror It is void I fly to the window. I bathe • tny fevered brow, my parched lips in the pallid light of the argent moon, shining with mild, benevolent eye upon the great city wrapt in slumber before my view. By degrees kind Nature sheds her genial calmness into my troubled spirit. There, in that solemn nocturnal hour, my grand idea evolves itself distinctly out of the chaos of unexecuted plans, and rises a vast,, majestic temple before my view. It is true," jldded M. Parlandet, pensively, I catch myself a frightful cold, but—what matter ? I have saved my tlenefactor 1" He wiped his- hands upon his handkerchief, passed it over his heated face, and looked round at his hearers. 17he attitude of the man, and the expression of bis countenance were so completely those pf a ranting actor who considers he has made a point, that White turned away to hide a smile. Kleckser looked on with an expression of intense enjoyment. WhifHes and Gwillim, who had not understood ail the rhapsody, glanced at each other with raised eyebrows, and a cast of face that seemed to say, his old game! frying to humbug'the governor again." Upon the merchant himself M. Parlandet's high- flown language apparently produced but small effect. Be surveyed the performance with a calmly-critical tJr, as a man regards .the feats of a clever juggler, engaged at a high price for his own special amusement; podded his head, and observed coolly- "Very good, M. Parlandet. Pray continue. That fa onlv the overture. Be so kind now as to raise the curtain. < Saved my benefactor I believe is the cue. Please do not forget to tell us from what danger the nefactor-meaning me, I presume much obliged- has been saved." As an acrobat, whose first feats of strength, though feceived with civil plaudits, have not excited much enthusiasm, bounds with renewed vigour upon the Stage to execute a trick of skill that, shall bring own the house, so M. Parlandet at an Flewker's gibe. chap 8 "But monsieur is hard upon the humblest of his plaves," he exclaimed, with fawning adulation. He is pleased to mock himself at the respectful yet eager interest the poor Parlandet presumes to feel in further- ing his fortunes. Monsieur inquire from what peril it has been my proud and happy privilege to preserve Iny benefactor? Then I say boldly, he is saved by JtlY idea from the labour and trouble of continued |QH, from the disapgsintment of gassing a long life in

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