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Penarth Election Notes.

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Penarth Election Notes. BY THE MAN ON THE SPOT. Not even the most sanguine of our friends—the enemy —expected such a majority as 825 for Major Quin. Well, the battle is won and lost, but its lessons ought not to go unheeded. o 0 0 The registration blunder which under such circum- stances is worse than a crime demands a strict inves- tigation. That a man should be robbed of his political birthright through a bungling printer is a stupendous shame. Granted that the Overseer's register was correct in the first instance, who is responsible for seeing that the ones subsequently printed and used on and before the polling day had no omissions ? Here is Mr Baggett, Maughan St, a ratepayer upwards of 20 years deprived of his vote whilst the son, living with his father, has a lodgers' vote and is able to re- cord it- This was not the only instance of omission which called forth jmurmurs if not loud at any rate deep. 0 0 0 In contradistinction was a voter who avowed the reason of his not voting was because no Labour Can- didate qut up. Blessed be the goddess Vacuity o 0 0 That thing—to call him man would be a libel— ought not only to be disfranchised, but also ostracised. A murrain on such reptiles! 0 0 The late member for South G-lamorgan made an irre- parable error by false economy- To contest a seat four times in a decade makes a tremendous hole in £5000" nevertheless Mr Williams lost his seat by at- tempting to get in with as little expense as possible. We cannot blame him altogether, but we do blame the rich Liberal magnates of the division for not coming up trumps and helping with the needful, thcreby emulating the Cardiff—Cheque—Scene. 0 0 0 I have subsequently learnt that in the counting room, the two contestants ran neck and neck till the Penarth box was opened, when the Major made the rest of the running and won in a common canter. a o a In making his triumphal progress through the division on Saturday, Major Quin visited Penarth and whilst thanking his supporters, said that the electorate at Penarth had largely assisted in returning him to Westminster. The gist of his remarks on this point was that Penarthhad gone almost solid for him. This cannot be gainsaid, for out of the 2250 voters only 1250 or tbere-abouts polled. The abstentions were the floating population, i. e. the trimmers, pilots, etc. who were Reds, whilst every Blue was well whipped up, and had the advantage of vehicular transit. 000 We have to thank Mr W Pyman and Mr Robert Bird, Cardiff, for the twojoutof the three conveyances which the Radicals had. There is no doubt that we lost in the West Ward, owing to the faulty arrangement of a portion having to vote at Penarth and the other at Cogan coupled with there being no public or private direction, till they arrived at either the one station or the other and finding they had to go to t'other one. o 0* The first two to record their votes were Mr W. Jones Thomas dnd District Councillor J Y Strawson. .0. On the polling day, a prominent Liberal said We.Jt have all future local contests conducted politically and shift some of the School Board Members. Carslake Thompson and Holman won't go in again on the backs I of the Nonconformiats." The irrepressible punster has cropped up -ven whilst we are in the throes of an election. The Unionist member for Cardiff said at the outset of the- campaign that he was going to Mac(a.)clean sweep of the Radio cals. The Major for South Glamorgan said he waS bound to get in, for his name began and ended with a vviri-(Wyn)dbam Q(uin) whilst the Unionist victor- ies are due to the women folk who are all for union- to a man. 0 0 0 Perhaps afte.r all the best thing that could happen was the defeat of Sir William Harcourt, at Newcastle. It may open the eyes and reach the sluggish con- sciences of those Englishmen who are always boasting that they are free, in fact, the degraded slaves of the vilest tyranny that modern civilisation has ever known* Their fathers shed their blood like water because they would not acknowledge the divine right of Stuart 11 ZD kings to trample on the consciences of men; bat they themselves are to-day endorsing the divine rio-bt of the big brewers to flood every district in the land with drunkenness, debauchery and pauperism without th6 least regardt Q the wishes of the people themselves. Sir William Harcourt did not propose to close a single puplic-house In England- He only proposed to give the people themselves the power to decide whether they would have public-houses in their midst, and how many they would have. -3fethodist Times.

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