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;:z ,CAUGHT AT LAST; j» ob,…

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BRUISES AND CUTS.

;:z ,CAUGHT AT LAST; j» ob,…

;:z ,CAUGHT AT LAST; j» ob,…

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r"TTrs £ ~metr M. Louis one evening when I was returning from taking some work to Regent Street. It was raining hard, and he offered me the shelter of his umbrella home. Afraid of getting wet, I accepted the offer. He soon found I was a stranger, and spoke to me in German. Ah it was so sweet to hear the sound of my mother-tongue in that great wilderness of strange houses and unknown people. I think this must have been the reason why I was first attracted towards him. M. Louis was well-dressed and hand- some, and seemed to have plenty of money. At first I felt afraid of him, for my mother always told me, dear lady, that a poor girl must beware of gentlemen above her in position, who only seek her acquaintance for base and cruel ends. So I kept out of his way for some time, coming and going with my work at different hours. But as he had found out where I lived when he saw me home, he called upon me one day, and asked how it was he never met me. I told him that a gentleman like him could have nothing good to say to such a poor girl as I, and that it. was best we should not meet. He called me a prim i. ttle goose, and declared he meant nothing wrong. A lId- and—he spoke so kindly, all in my own dear language, lady, that I believed him. chap 6 Well, that happened at last which I ought to have foreseen, and I was a lost and shameful girl. Then M. Louis asked me to come and live with him as his wife. I told him, if he had any honour in him, he would repair the injury he had done, by making me his wife indeed. But he only laughed, told me again I was a silly little goose, and declared he would never desert me. We were married, he said, in spirit, and that was enough for any sensible person. Would I come and live with him ? What could I do, dear lady ? My self-respect was gone. Besides, I really did love M. Louis, in spite of the way in which he had behaved to me. At least, I thought I loved him. I see now it was my fancy, not my heart, that was really touched. M. Louis and I then lived together as man and wife. But, as I told the gentleman who sent me here, I never knew his other name or his business, or any- thing more about him. Stay," said the girl, check- ing herself and drawing with difficulty a small parcel from beneath her pillow, this is his picture. Keep it, kind lady, that you may know him if chance should ever bring you together." She handed the photograph to Mrs. White. It was the likeness of a dark-complexioned man of about forty, with commonplace features, a sensual mouth, the cheeks and chin closely shaven, but blue with the stubble of a thick dark beard. The eyes of the por- trait were peculiar—lurking, crafty, cruel. It was not the face of a man you could trust. The widow placed it on the table by the bedside. Oh, my baby, my baby!" moaned Anna. "Am I never to see her again ?" Mrs. White pacified her with the assurance that the arrival of the'ehild would not\be long delayed. "I hope not—oh! I hope not!" gasped the girl. What is to become of her when I am gone I do not know, for she has not a friend in the world." So long as I live, Anna," said the widow,"solemnly, through Raymond, your child shall never want a friend." Bless you, dear lady, bless you for those precious words sobbed Anna. "I was hoping, hoping you would speak them, but dared not ask. Bless you for this mercy to the wretched and the fatherless She may well say fatherless," said Raymond to his mother. If this scoundrel were ever discovered, it would be atrocious to consign the child to his hands." "That shall never be!" returned his mother de- cisively. "But urge her to end her story. She will be more composed when she has told us all." chap a (To be continued.)