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nns aocument is the last win and testament ot your honoured father, drawn up and executed by him, in the presence of a notary of this town, as by law ordained and appointed, shortly before his death. Shall I read the will ?" "It is false," cried Jobst, nercely ;"my father nevet made a will Show it to me, I say He started forward, tore the document from Pieter'! nands, dashed over the leaves, and recognised his father's well-known signature at the conclusion. His face grew white and rigid. "It is a forgery!" he cried, wrenching at the parchment, in the vain attempt to tear the leaves asunder. They held his hands, took the will from his despe- rate clutch, and gave it back to Pieter. TeU him what the will says," exclaimed a com- passionate bystander. The purport of the testament is this," continued Pieter. "'Mynheer Hendrijk van Flewker desires that his son. Mynheer Jobst, shall enter into the bonds of wedlock with JuSrouw Hedwig van Broun, Juffrouw Margret van Jonah, or Juffrouw Katrina van Robinsonk, in which case the entire property of Mynheer Hendrijk comes into the possession of hie son, the said Mynheer Jobst. But upon this condition abac can the young Man inherit. If he abstain from marriage for five years after the decease of Mynheer Hendrijk; or marrying, wed any other person than one of the damsels above-named, then, and in that case, from the expiration of one month after the said term of nvc years', or from the date of such his marriage, Mynheer Jobst shall forfeit all right to the property of Mynheer Hendrijk whatsoever. The said property shall be then divided into two parts: one moiety being equally apportioned as dowry to each of the three damsels aforesaid; the other moiety being devoted to the endowment of a refuge for the widows and orphans of distressed and castaway mariners. Mynheer Hendrijk van FIewker makes this disposition of his property to test the nlial obedience of his son, Mynheer Jobst. Upon which account Pieter Maritxburg, who is entrusted with the execu- tion of this testament, is solemnly aud strictly charged, as he values his Soul's satvation, to keep the said testament secret from the said Jobst until, by the conditions of the will, the ultimate disposi- tion of the said property may have been deter- mined.' The old man's voice, which had faltered per- ceptibly as he read the concluding paragraph, broke down completely as he approached its close, and the final words could only be heard by those at his side. Low as they were spoken, however, they were loud enough for the wretched Jobst. The blast of a thousand trumpets could not have sounded more terrific in his startled ears. He turned a despairing eye upon his wife, clasped his hands together above his head, and ejaculating, "Lost! lost! beggared! oh, my Rosalba!" felt heavily, with a wailing cry, upon the Boor. Pieter and Rosalba rushed to his assistance. Ser- vants were called, who carried Jobst to a bedroom, whilst others were sent to summon a physician. Van Broun, Van Jonah, Van Robinsonk, and their ad- herents, who had surveyed the scene with phlegmatic calm, regarding it rather as a pleasant spectacle for which there was nothing to pay, waited for a time, upon the chance of anything more occurring for their delectation, then stolidly went their way, discussing the chances of Jobst's life or reason surviving the overtlirow of his fortunes. Chap 2 Meanwhile, in the room above, Jobst had recovered consciousness, only to pass from prostration to raving despair. In vain Pieter, the tears rolling down his aged cheeks, implored his master to be calm in vain Rosalba,her native goodness of heart shining through the terrible shock of the discovery, besought him not to grieve over the fortune he had lost, and assured him she cared nothing for riches so t'nat he remained to her. Jobst was not to be packed. He railed at Pieter's reticence, cursed his father's reHned and horrible cruelty in the dispositions of the testament, and swore, if there was la.w or justice left in Holland, to overturn the will. But Nature would not b" denied. Late in the night he sank into a troubled slumber, over which the watchers, Age and Affection, kept anxious ward. When Jobst awoke next day his ma.la.dy ha.d assumed a different phase. Sulten :tnd gloomy de- spondency replaced the violent passion of the previous night. Not a word would he utter, not a sign would he give. No refreshment could be forced upon him. Dark, deep, and brooding mf\ncholy settled down upon his features ;I.t:) a m!!k. Thus four days passed. Chap 2 Early in the nfth day, as the jrey tints of dawn were stealing into the sky, and birds were twittering merrily among the trees in the garden, this was the sight that might have been seen in Jobst van Flewker's sick chamber. A figure lying on a bed, on one side of which sits an old man, upon the other a young woman, haggard t, and worn for want of rest. By degrees the eyes of both the watchers close, their heads nod gradually forward, then settle upon their breasts. They sleep. Silence reigns in the sick-room. Presently the recumbent figure in the bed uncloses his eyes. 'With quick and vivid gaxe his glance darts from one guard to the other. Btill they sleep. At last, then, the long-watched opportunity has come Very slowly, very cautiously, the ngure slides one leg from beneath the bedding; the other limb follows. Slowly, still slowly—hush !—he glides, as the snako glides over brushwood, noiselessly, stealthily, for- wards, till he stands erect upon the Boor. Hush! still the watchers sleep. Gently, gently, as the footfall of the moccassined Indian following up the trail, unheard, almost invisibly, the maniac steps on tiptoe to his dressing- table, opens a case, dr&ws rapidly forth a glittering blade, passes his fingers cautiously along its edge. It S sharp, it is true a vacant smile lights up his features. Wagging his head to and fro, he mops and mows at his image in the glass. At this moment the female watcher wakens with a start. Is it a, dream has warned her, or the faithful instinct o! a loving heart ? Her first glance is to thi¡! bed. Empty She springs to her feet with a shrielk, sees the gibbering form at the table, and rushes towards it. Too late Too late'. A roar, as of a wild beast bounding upon its booty, fills the a.ir. A ila.sh, a sweep c'f the shining blade, and the lunatic suicide falls prostrate at appalled Eosalba's feet. The old man, roused from the heavy jeep of wearied age by the clamour, sees two bodies, male and female, lying across each other in a dreadful reeking pool. His poor dazed eyes at nrst can hardly realise the awful truth. But when it breaks upon him in all 't<-

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