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"--------.-CAUGHT AT LAST;…

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CAUGHT AT LAST; OB, THE FELON'S BRAND. a(Tmrrers of the fascinating actress was Mynheer Jobst van Flewker. The taerchant fell a victim at once, without a struggle. Here was the charming creature of whom he had so !ccg sighed here were the delight, the happiness, the ever-varying entertainment, the bliss he had so vainly fought in the commonplace daughters of Van Broun, Van Jonah, and Van Robinsonk. Could he transplant this goddess to his nreside, make her the companion pf his future life, how blest wcu'd be his lot' What a. mother must a creature so gifted make to his children ? Jobst turned the matter over in his mind for a week, then sought an interview with Rosalba vanLevissen; told his name, his standing, his position; explained to her the amount of his riches, and asked }her point blank to become his wife. The tady fequested a couple of days for deliberation, which Van Flewker immediately conceded, and took his !$tve. Chap 2 Upon the appointed day the merchant hastened to t)ls charmer's house, and was transported with the Kply which issued from beneath the folds ofRc8=nba's Handkerchief, modestly hiding a face which did not blush. The ardent lover made eager preparations for the Wedding, the approach of which he communicated to Pieter Maritzburg. The old man's face assumed a crave and earnest look when he heard the news. Mynheer," said the trusty Pieter, "I hope that What you tell me is not true. You are aware that your nonoured house has always intermarried with the Van Brouns, the Van Jonahs, or the Van Robin- §onhs. You know, too, it was the desire of my late worthy master—heaven rest his soul!—that you should Select a wife from one of these three families. I hope, tnynheer, you will not act contrary to your honoured father's wish." My worthy Pieter," replied Jobst, it is quite tmpossible my father's wishes in this respect can be obeyed. In choosing a wife, a man must please him- self. He has to live with her, not with his defunct ancestors, like the old Egyptians, and he mast use his judgment." "But, mynheer, there is another circumstance which feeders this choice particularly repugnant——" com- B9teoced Pieter. Mind what you say, Master Pieter shouted Jobst. M My future wife is not to be spoken of with dis- respect." Chap 2 "Dear, dear!" groaned luckless Pieter. "These 13eadstrong young men! But do you know, mynheer, that this worn—this lady, I mean-is positively not even a Christian. She is a pagan, a heretic, or Worse, a Jewess. It is impossible, unheard of, Sacrilegious almost, that a Van Flewker should wed a Jewess!" Is she ?" said Jobst, indifferently. Really I didn't 'now it-nor, worthy Pieter, will that in any way glter my resolution. Juffrow Rosalba will be your raster's wife within a month." "Mynheer! mynheer ejaculated Pietfr, in great glistress. "It cannot be. It must not be. The <p'eatest misfortunes will happen if this match takes place." And the old man wrung his hands. pis pertinacity aroused Jobst's attention. What 11ean you, Pieter ?" he inquired. What misfortune t<m happen if I marry one I love ?" a- I dare not say more, master, t)Ut be warned In jthne. I repeat most solemnly, the greatest ill wil (tapper to vou if you make this match." Chap 21 The wedding-day arrived. Jobst and the lovely Rosalba were married according to both Protestant Md Jewish rites; the latter at the lady's especial Desire, who felt naturally anxious there should be no mistake about the validity of the ceremony. To lobst's extreme surprise, the entire families of the three rejected damsels attended at church, and witnessed the proceedings with perfect composure. although the bridegroom thought this proceceding in bad taste, he was glad to perceive they were so far feconci'ed o their disappointment; but was again puzzled to perceive a, significant grin distend the features of each broad countenance as he led his bride down the aisle. In an adjacent pew Jobst noticed the woe-begone face of Pieter Maritzburg, whose withered Cheeks were stained with tears. When the honeymoon had come to an end, Jobst van Flewker and his wife returned to Rotterdam. They found a, crowd upon the quay when they left the Steamer to seek the merchant's carriage, which by Some oversight "as not in waiting. The townspeople ranged themselves in two lines, as if at a strange Sight, Jobst and his wife passing up the middle to the hired vehicle that had been obtained. The driver was Ordered to take them to Van FIewkcr's house. "Very careless of Pieter not to have sent the Carriage," said Jobst. I wrote to tdl him when we Should arrive." The droschky drew up at Jobst van Flewker's mansion. Open Hew the door as the vehicle stopped, and out stepped the respectable citizens Van Hroun, Van Jonah, and Van Robinsons, Pieter Maritxburg, hovering dismay in the background. "Welcome home, Mynheer Jobst van FIev.ker [' exclaimed' the three men, bowing and smiling, with a particular emphasis on the word home." You are very good gentlemen," said Jobst, alighting, and assisting big wife from the vehicle. "But a'5 this happens to be my house, perhaps it would be better if the welcome came from me. The three men laughed—a hard, unpleasant laugh; the laugh of men who gloat upon another's woe. Walk in, mynheer," said Van Broun. We have a communication to make to you." Van Flewker looked at his wife. who was clinging icohisarm. A horrid suspicion for an instant smote his soul but he drove it away manfully, and walked ;nto the house. Pieter Maritzburg leading the way, and the three citizens following. When thfv entered the large dining saloon, Jobst Was astonished to And it nlled with the relatives and acquaintances of the men who had met him at the door. He turner upon Pieter savagely. "Tell me this instant, old man," he exclaimed, ''the meaning of this assembly! Why do I find mine gnemies in mine house." Pieter turned to the burshers, mutely. Tell him, Pieter Maritxbm'g," was the rep'y. Mynheer Jobst van Flewker," said Fieter, pblemnly, son of my Ia.te honoured master, and Descendant of the house my: fathers a,nd I have served prom our youth up, listen to me." He drew a paper from his breast and con- tine_d-

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"--------.-CAUGHT AT LAST;…

"--------.-CAUGHT AT LAST;…