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LITERARY EXTRACTS. -

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READINGS FOR THE YOUNG. .

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moti AMERICAN HTMOUK

LITERARY EXTRACTS. -

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I rapids rt rushes fiercely and wITcHyon both sides of an island where stands one of the very oldest churches in Ireland-a diminutive building, with roof of stone-grey, worn, and battered, but too firm and solid to be called a ruin. Just before the river divides it passes close under the old cathedral. The sound of the rushing waters can be heard as the people pass under the ancient deeply-moulded arch into the dim, solemn, quiet house of prayer. A fine specimen of early Irish architecture is this church of St. Flannan. It is half covered with ivy, but it is well preserved, and has, during late years, been carefully restored. It has a massive square tower. Its lancet windows are tall and narrow, but exquisitely proportioned; each deeply-cut moulding, each quaintly-carved corbel, is a study for the antiquary. The Norman arch and dog-tooth fretwork were still lingering with the childhood of Gothic when the cathedral was built, and the Transition style gives it a peculiar interest and beauty. In this old cathedral the new bishop's enthronement took place. The ceremony caught a shade of the pathos that wa observed in the scene outside. There was something in it touching, sad, speaking of struggle and difficulty, Mad a present coming through a much-tried past, and yet it was at the same time bright with cseery eontentment, with pleasant human sympathy, and With readily upspringing hope.-The Quiver This was the secret of his good luck Lhe was so obliging." Did the merchant or waggoner want an errand boy, or did anyone want a job done at a moment's notice, it was only to get sight of Will and it was as good as done for Will would hurry through his own business in order to help. When he was at home he kept the wood-box full of wood, and his mother never had to ask him to bring up a scuttle of coals, and many other little things did he do in a cheerful manner, so that he was a great favourite. If he saw younger boys in trouble, he would try to help them out; and he put on his shoes, after having taken them off one pouring, wet night, to walk two miles to the town for a parcel containing a new gown the carrier had neglected to bring to the kitchen girl, who was crying bitterly because she could net have it to wear next morning at her sister's wedding. But it was not so much what Win did, as how he did it, that was so agreeable.

READINGS FOR THE YOUNG. .