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"You must address me as 'father,' Marmaduke,, if you please," said Sir William, loftily. I strongly object to the term you have just made use of. Please remember that in future. Now tell me what are your plans and pursuits." Marmaduke then gave his parent a full account of his late proceedings and hopes for the future. He did not conceal anything, and the glib manner of speaking, combined with the many slang expressions with which he garnished his narrative, made a not agreeable impression upon the aristoctatic General, who, indeed, felt sore distressed. A ter an hour's conversation, Marmaduke took himself off to hunt rats, and Sir William, scarcely 'hiring to meet his wife at the moment, so disap- pointed did he feel, was glad- to run against Captain r.ushleigh, who was always deep in his confidence. With him Sir William took a walk round the house, leaving lady Deane in her boudoir expecting him momentarily to return. When she looked out after a time, she perceived Marmaduke rushing off to his rat hunt, and soon noticed Sir William and his friend arm in arm in close conversation. I am sure, she thought, William might have devoted this afternoon, at any rate, to m- But Sir William was very deep in his confabula- tion with his friend. Rushleigh," he said, I am puzzled, and, I con- fess, disappointed. How is it P You are a close student of human nature. Can you put two throughbreds together and expect to find a cart- horse ?" C P No," replied the captain; "it's not in Nature. The strain will come out. I suppose you allude to yourself and your son ? "Yes. It is, perhaps, a conceited parallel to draw, but it will serve the occasion. How is it possible that such a lad as my son can have been born of such a mother ? Lady Deane is thoroughbred to the back- bone. The boy-God forgive me-is a cad I can't help saying it, Rushleigh. He is not a gentleman." I think you have been expecting too much," replied the captain, "The youth is not a bad fellow, as far as I can see. He is shy and reserved—pas- sionate if you will, but wants leading. A gentle firm hand would bring him round. He is not bad look- ing he is tall and strong, and in excellent condi- Ron. If he were my son I would send him to college, a tome large public school." *'?<a, you are right, Rushleigh; I have been ex- pecting too much. I have pinned my heart so to that lad that I am, rightly punished for my satfiah- ness. Yes; he shall go to a public school and forget all about this Minnie Collier girl." Rushleigh was on the point of mentioning the great likeness which existed between her and the General, but he refrained. He determined to ascer- tain the origin of this curious coincidence and with that object he sought an interview with Minnie in the house. But by the time he had soothed his old friend and found himself at liberty to question the young lady he found she had been sent home in charge of one of the servants, and all he could do was to ask where she was to be found. General Deane, at dinner that evening, communi- cated to his wife, and indirectly to his son, his newly- made determination to send the' latter to school or college, and the young man registered a mental vow to run away sooner than be so humiliated! Was he who had been educated at home by a long-suffering tutor, and permitted to have all his own way when- ever he pleased; was he to be sent to college, when he would be put under restraint, and made to' learn "beastly" Latin aLl Greek? "Not much," he said to himself., 'Then another brilliant idea struck him. He might certainly run away, but what if het carried Minnie with him? All was fair in war and love. Minnie might be induced to meet him, and then he fancied he could persuade her to marry him, for, selfish as Marmaduke Deane was, he was honourably disposed to the girl, and really intended to make her his wife. He trusted to time to create an affection for him if he could only persuade her to leave home. Humility and penitence were his best cards, and these he determined to play at first. t-{ He had no real doubt respecting her eventual acceptance of his overtures when she JJfound no immediate escape. So the only difficulty Marma- duke had to encounter was the attendance of the girl at the place he intended to meet her. Perhaps he could enlist her mother in the plot. She was quite willing to let him marry Minnie. If his own plan failed, he would request Mrs. Layton to use her parental authority. J'eantime he made his preparations secretly. n. packed up some things, and put by all his ready money. By degrees, as he had a handsome allow- ance, he managed to save a considerable sum, and he found to his hands an easy tool in the person oi I Stn d'v Sam, who was ready and willing to perpe- trate any act of villainy if he were only paid suffi- ciently high. u'i -.r While amiaduke and his ally were plotting the abduction ot the innocent Minnie layton, she was J busil}' engaged in shaping her own destiny—quite independently of mother or father. The old story scarcely needs telling. She had made her choice, I and the devotion of young Watson had touched her heart. lie had sought her love, declared his passion, and thus, unknown to all but him, Minuip had plighted her troth to Edward Wat so ¡ CHAPTER XXX. AN AMBUSH AND A DISCOVERT. MINNIE missed her "Uncle George" very muctU He appeared to her in the light of a parent. She looked up to him for advice and assistance, and when she saw her d ar "uncle," as she persisted in calling him, carried to the little churchyard, her grief knew no bounds. For the first time in her life she then felt the want of a companion, and her heart desired a confidant. It i, that whe n an engagement between two young people has been broken off, and— Alas how light a cause may move Oissention between hearts that love, that they arc more prone to attach themselves to other "athnities" af.er such a rupture. My own experience does not warrant me in under-writing I this s'atorncnt, but it has been said so, and a girl once deprived of her lover will cast her tendrils upon some other object, as the ivy torn from one place will eliag to another, and grow up green and strong again. M ind, I do not commit myself to this theory as exemplified in humanity. I only give it expression and think it probable. At any rate Minnie'found herself very lonely after poor Uncle George' died, and her usual walk to the