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i [ALL Rianrs RESIltVZD.1 r NO: ROBBER Y. ET HENRY FRITH. /tithor of "The Mystery of Moor Farm," "On the Wincjs of the Wind," Through Flood, Through r Fi1 e," fc., &c. CHAPTER XXIX.' THE GENERAL'S RETURN.—A DISAPPOINTMENT. WHEN Lucy lay ton was informed of the sad and eudden death of poor George Collier, she first experi- enced a sense of relief, but this selfish feeling did not last long, She recalled all his tenderness and love in the old days, his constancy and friendship in the later times; the kind heart and simple faith which had piade him ever welcome to all, and the tears started to her eyes. She felt she would never have such a friend again. < It is always thus. When we have a friend we do pot value him or her-the old parallel can he drawn daily. We do not care for what we possess, but when we lose it we feel the want of it-no matter what it may be, money,'friendship, or love. So with Lucy and Collier. Though she had never really loved him, his faith and steadfastness had J impressedher very deeply, and she would have married Jaim as she had agreed to do had not death so suddenly Snatched him away. It was very sad. Everybody respected the late inspector, and the expressions of regret andj condolence with Lucy Layton were Unanimous, and crowds attended the funeral. Minnie was fortunately spared the sudden shock which the news of his death would have caused her by being taken to the Hail, where I ady Deane, titer the first and private interview with her so long- absent husband was over, paid her as much attention jas could have been expected. Lady Deane bad already remarked the likeness between her husband and Minnie, and Captain Rushleigh had seen it also the moment Minnie entered the railway carriage. There was some mystery here which he could not penetrate, and Lady Deane could of course say notlrng. Marmaduke Deane had hardly recognised Minnie when he was sent for by the General, who wished to have an oppoitunity to speak w'th him alone. Something that Lady Deano' had l"t fall during their interview and lengthened conversation, born of long absence, had in a measure prep red the General for a son and heir not after his own heart. This was even with the joy of a happy and honored return to his home, in his heart a ù-isallpointment" He felt some difficulty in sustaining. He sat in the library waiting for the young man to come to him, and the uppermost feeling in his heart was that of bitterness. Ho had pictured to himself as he returned how glad h' should be to welcome his son. How the youth would come out to meet him, and how the sacrcdinterview with wife and child would be held in happy i rivacv and 'love. But what were the faets r Ais untoward accident bad nearly cost him his life. His arrival at home was not greeted by the heir, whose doociencies had in a measure been concealed by his loving wife, for phe knew quite well the teriihle disappo ntment General Sir William V.C., would experience when he found his son so far beneath him in manner and appearance—the high rank and station for which he himself had toiled and striven. He had made a name for himself, and he had hoped to transmit it unsullied to all irreproachable son. Alas, if all his forebodings wer« true, 1 is antici- pations would never be accompli hed. The son oi is heart was rude, rouirh, and, worse than all, had get his mind upon an nllmnce which, however well conducted the girl might be, could never bring the honour or prosperity and station with it which he. Sir W illiam, had a right to expect. Even now he was kept- waiting for the young man who, had he possessed a. tittle of respect and affec- tion, would, have been at hand to welcome him Nc wonder Sir Williu.n was bitter, and that his heart Was sorely grieved. At length the door of the library was opened, and Marmsidnko pr.sirnt^d hiinsnlf. lie had no idea what he ought to do or say. Towards hit parents and relatives ho was not demonstrative. He kept all his energy in that direction for Minnie Layton, or any other lady who happened to let him perceive that his attent ons wre not dis- agreeable. So lie came in shyly. Sir William, who had at any rate expected that the lad wou'd exhibit, some signs of affection, was ready and willing to meet him as it wer<3 half wav. lie wai anxious to se-i him and ah with him, but when Marmaduke paused, with his hind upon the lock of the door and did not attempt to co:nc in, the General felt as much anger as disappointment. 11 Weil, Marmaduke, have yon nothing to sav to me—to your father?" sa, d the (General. "Have you no welcome for me, now that we moot for the first timer" 2WarmHduke advanced, and. feeling dreadfullv bored and dull, took the General's outstretched hand and said— "How arc you? Are you quite well? We Scarcely expected you so sum." Then Marmaduke withdrew bjs hand, and took cut his handkerchief to wipe his tetCO. And this was the meeting the General liifi antici- pated so long. "How are you ? We scarcely expected you His son and heir welcomed him at home like this! "Sit down, Marmaduke. T.et me look at you. Close here. Why, what's the ma ter with your mouth? Been fighting r I hope not." "Yes I have," replied Marmaduke bluntly, "nut I gave about as good as T g .t. We had a tm-n-UD about Minnie—thit girl in the drawing-room. I like her, and, I say, does cut up ro;igh about it I can tell you." I have spoken to your mother on the snb-'ect. The girl has rendered us all au immense saved our lives in fact, and she appears a very lady- like young zirl. But marriage, my dear Manna- duke, with her is out of the question." Why ? I like her, and-" "Even if she liked you—and you know whether fhe does or not She would if that idiot Watson didn't ( her. He is a cad, I can tell you. We had a regular get to.' Let me see the girl," governor." ") Governol' ;This Wil in the old General's ears a terrible title. To be called governor officially was music to his ear. in his command, but to be addressed so by his vulsrar son—for, alas, the General could not hide the truth from himself—was ltl) TY1"'11 n""

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i ','[ALL Rianrs RESIltVZD.1…