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.-fALL MGHT8 RISVrrKD. )

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.-fALL MGHT8 RISVrrKD. )

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TO wiiit corps does t-hat officer belcsg V inquired the colonel. The Guides, I believe, sir," was the reply. Fetch him to my quarters presently. I'm sure I have seen him before. He saved my life at any rate." But the man never appeared. Still his features remained impressed upon the colonel's memory, and when years afterwards they met again, he recognised him. It was after the mutiny had been suppressed, and Sir William Deane was homeward bound. The great struggle was over, and when all was quiet, Sir William, then a General, was up at Simla. He was about to leave India, after several years active and garrison service, and just before he quitted the station he was introduced to Captain RushIeigh of the Irregular Cavalry. Captain Rushieigh was a fine, well-formed man, his bronzed cheeks and a deep, but not disfiguring, scar upon his brow bearing testimony to the service he had seen. When General Deane was introduced, the y^zjbi- officer greeted him formally, but the General I am pleased to make your acquaintance, Cap'tizn Rushleigh, for I have hcard of your many acts of daring and skilful disposition of your men." Rushleighbowed and murmured a few words expressive of the pleasure he experienced from the General's praise. "f think we have met before," continued Sir William. Surely, you were at Delhi! "flg The captain of Irregulars would have evaded this direct inquiry had it been possible, but he was in the midst of a group of men who had seen and recog- nised his exploits, and to d-eny his identity was now impossible. He therefore assented, and was about to change the conversation, when Sir William continued- Stop, Bir. I trust you will not consider me in- trusive, but'your features are quite famil'ar to me. Is it possible that I have the pleasure of seeing the officer who I cannot but consider saved my life at Delhi I think I did Dot a Pandv in a tree who was taking aim at you, General; but I cr*dit 'Z — "I beg your pardon. You will permit me to con- sider my life worth something to myself and family at any rate. I have often wished to meet that officer. Captain Rushleigh, I thank you warmly as a soldier, and—if you will permit me—as a fnend." The captain had no alternative. He was a reserved and undemonstrative man. He seldom associated intimately with any up at Simla, but with the officers of his own regiment he was very popular and much liked by the men. Under the circumstances he could do no less than assent, comforting himself with the assurance that he was about to quit India, for a time at any rate. He had sent in his papers and resigned his com- mission. Private affairs, he said, required his pre- sence in England, and he had had done his work. All through the mutiny he had carried his corps to victory, and for months afterwards he had performed services which entitled him to some distinction. But his rewards never came as he, perhaps, expected. He had received medals and praises, but other military distincticn was not for him. So he determined to resign his troop and had obtained leave for a month to go up to Simla. Here he met General Deane. The General was satisfied that he had at last met the man whose unerring aim, whose coolness in the midst of a storm of 'bullets in the street of Delhi had certainly saved Sir William's life. But, besides this, the General was haunted by a suspicion that he had seen the man under different circumstances. "Where could this man and I have met before?" This was the question the senior officer put to him- self many times. His inquiries did not lead to much, however. There was a confused idea that the officer and a certain Sowar were one and the same man, but no clue guided itself to the General's mind. One day the conversation turned upon military executions, and-General Deane, being asked, related the curious experience which he had had. He narrated the incidents already set forth respecting the escape of Sergeant Layton, and tho extraordinary substitution of the offend ing officer. "I tried all in my power to get the man off," con- tinued the General. "I made it even a personal matter, and put the circumstances as favourably as I could. There was some error somewhere. I am glad the poor fellow esdaped: he only acted upon impulse, though a very reprehensible one. I have often wondered what became of him." Enlisted, probably, and got shot in the mutiny," suggested one present. "No. I fancy I heard of him," said an old colonel._ "I took a great interest in his case, for I knew him well, and he had a deuced pretty wife." "By-thc-by, what became of her?" asked the General. She went to England, I heard. But misfortunes never come alone. The ship was wrecked, and many perished. There was a good deal of talk about many perished. There was a good deal of talk about her at one time. She was was more sinned against than sinning, I believe I I quite agree with you," said Captain Rush- leigh. ".But what became of her9 Was she lost? Do you happen to remember the ship's ntme Well, hardly," replied the person addressed. I became acquainted with the circumstances through the surgeon. I have no doubt her husband will turn up some day. He is one of those fellows who have as many lives as a cat." I should like to see him," remarked the captain, as he rose and left the room. I am truly sorry his wife is diad, I knew her well, and liked her very much. Excuse me, gentlemen." He quitted the room, and the conversation took another turn, but the General murmured— I am sure I have met that man before. I must endeavour to find out where CHAPTER XX. TEMPTATION.—A RrnE SHOCK. To say that George Collier was not startled when he perceived Sandy am so close to him, and at such a time, would be wronging the signalman. He did feel very considerably alarmed, but in an instant he had made up his mind to ignore all unpleasantness, and thus endeavour to throw the leader of the strike off his guard. Hallo, mate, what brings you here?" he said, assuming a cheerful tone, though be was far from feeling checrful. just then. Come out and tell us the news." The other never answered, and Collier, with a fast-beatinc: b-art, NiQLit on. with his duties, and ■ ■■■ iii i