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.-fALL MGHT8 RISVrrKD. )

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fALL MGHT8 RISVrrKD. ) NO ROBBERY. IBT HENRY FEITH. 'Auitift of*" The Mystery of Moor Farm* TJn the ™ Wfa/i (if the Wind," Through Flood, Through Fire*$c.t Ac. CHAPTER XIX. THB TAXING OF DELHI-A GOOD SHOT, W. have been a long time absent from India, frbere stirring event's had been daily taking place. While our attention has been concentrated upon firs, Layton and the schemes she was weaving, Sir William Deane has been through many adventures ind seen some service. It does not come within the scope of this narrative to detail all the events which happened in that fventful period at Delhi, nor to do more than to touch upon the circumstances connected with the Jiege. We must, however, devote some little space to this period of history in order th-it the subsequent narrative may be understood. I September, 18.57, was an eventful month in our Indian territory, and Colonel Deane had been disiin- Slishing himself, as every one expected he would. e had never again encountered the Sowar he had met the evening of his arrival in camp, and the impression upon his mind was that the man had jleeerted. 4 The breaching batteries were completed early in the month, and for two nights and days they poured in a destructive fire upon the city. The prepara- tions for the assault were vigorously pushed on, and trenches were opened, and the Engineers worked un- molested until it was too late for the enemy to pre- vent them. On the 13th the breaches were reported practi- cable, and as colonel Deane was sleeping calmly amid all the din of bombardment, a light touch upon bis arm awoke him instantly. The colonel immediately leaped to his feet as if jwhamed of being caught napping," and perceived an orderly holding a lanthorn, and around him were Standing several officers, all busily engaged in read- ing the orders which had arrived. What is it ? When is the assault to take place?" inquired the colonel. I As early as ever we can. Six o'clock is the tour named, but no one can tell for certain," replied one of the officers. But the Rifles are to make the inspection to-night, and we shall have plenty of occupation to-morrow." It was even as he said. No sooner had the dark- pess begun to gather round than the Engineers, escorted and covered by a detachment of the 6Cth Rifles, came from under cover. Ten o'clock struck, and the'men moved out quietly and without 'noise to thJ gla-is. A ladder was at band, and two officers descended into the ditch, and then proceeded to mount to the summit of the breach. It was a bold and hazardous du'y, but there was 110 flinching. The young Engineer officer mounted and had nearly gained the top when a loose stone or some other loose object clattering roused the fnemy, and they came running along to the breach. Lying close, the Engineei s noted the state of the bastions and the condition of the breach. But the enemy uufortunately showed no signs of returning. There was nothing for it, therefore, but to retire the way they had come, and the Engineers accordingly Z, got up and descfndcd the breach. Under a galling fire they hurried back with the informafon that the breach was practicable, and their report was immediately conveyed to head- tuarters. The necessary orders were at once espatched and arrived »s had been related, after some had sought what rest they could find for the last night some of them were to pass on earth. Therj were four columns ef attack, and the Cashmere Gate was particularly entrusted to the Engineers, while Kissingunge, a village; on the road to Delhi, was occupied by the 3oorkahs. About daylight the action began, and the Goo; klihs had the first of it, and then the fight became general. The Cashmere has ion was carried by escalade, and not a man used his rifle until ho had gained a footing on the walls, when Colonel Deane found himself confronted by a strong force of rebels. They did not remain long though, and soon the Cashmere Gate was blown open, and the artillery- was ordered up. The oxen will not move, the drivers are unwilling, so the officers have to prod man and beast with their swords until they consent to proceed, and Delhi was entered. It was here that an incident occurred which had a very considerable influence upon the ofiicer with whose fortunes we are just now concerned; and this brought-him into contact with the mysterious individual whom lie had already noticed outside the city- It was no joke to cross the open space by the Church, for round shot and bullets were flying as thickly as can be imag'ned, and t'le rebels took good Care to keep concealed. There was a picket of the -V.'rid Foot closa by, and the men were get- ting hit just ecause they were too tired and careless to take any trouble to get under cover. Col n ;1 Deane rode up and remonstrated with the men who were very lax in discipline when not actually engaged, and were so tired and unruly, that they Seized upon any brandy or other liquor and drank greedily, notwithstanding all remonstrances. Not very far from where the colonel was standing was a tree, and in the' branches of it v'as perched a Sepoy, who'managed to avoid every shot the men fired at him. He was busily engaged shooting »t the ■British, and certainly two soldiers had fallen to his aim, when the colonel appeared. > Close by were some natives squatting under fhelter, and one of these had a long gun. The man in the tree was about to take aim, and just as he did so, the colonel became aware of the danger he was in. But he was unable to conceal himself, and did not hurry away. Another moment would have Healed his fate, when an officer of Irregulars sprang to his feet, and regardless of the bullets which were flying about, snatched a musket, levelled, and fired At the Sepoy. The man in the tree fell upon the roof of a house close by, and rolled from it to the ground, a corpse. He had been shot through the forehead. The colonel was saved. Without hesitation he turned to thank the native Officer, when to his astonishment the man hurried away without even a salute, or acknowledgment of kind. „ -710-"h 0 0 0 I 10][L

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.-fALL MGHT8 RISVrrKD. )