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[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] NO ROBBERY, t!io> y BY HENRY FRITH. father of "The Mystery of Moor Farm" On the Wings of the Wind," Through Flood, Through Fire," fe., &c. CHAPTER XIII. THE PHANTOM LOCOMOTIVE. STor'RE not going to turn your back upon me, George?"; It was a heart appeal to his old love and tender- j gless which she had betrayed and yet Lucy did not eeem to think of the injury she had done. She wanted help, and did not hesitate to stoop to ob- tain it. v But Collier turned away from her, and sat in Silence looking over the railway. George," she continued, approaching, but not touching him, George, don't scorn me, for I cannot bear it. rd rather lie down upon the rails there and be killed than think you despised me. For bid times, the happy days Old times! Ain't ye ashamed to come here talking of old times and happy days ? Who made them unhappy to remember? Who but yourself turned my love to bitterness and ran away ? And now you come back Well, never mind how. Who can tell whether you are married or not F I was—I am married. Oh, George, don't be so hard You are the only person I would come to. My husband A violent expression rose to George's lips, but he controlled himself. My husband took me to India. He, I thought, deceived me; and when I found he was not an officer as I fancied, I rebelled. He is- dead I be- lieve—killed by Sepoys; and now I have come back to beg your pardon, and die most likely." George looked at her as she spoke, and she per- ceived she had made an impression upon him. She was pretty and neat, and her figure, more rounded and matronly than of yore, would have been con- sidered good by competent judges. There was a caressing look in her eyes as they met his, and his stern gaze softened as it rested upon her, for had he not loved—did he not still love, this woman, and here she was again by his side, almost touching him. He stood up beside her for a moment, and then with a sudden movement put his arm around her. hp was startled but made no sign. Correctly she had ksTmaied Collier, She had piaywu If16 Strings—his devotion and his former passion. SEe had. created sympathy for herself, and might yet obtain his assistance in her views and plans. So she did not shrink from his emi race. He clasped her tightly to his side and felt his heart beating fast against her bosom. What if she were free, she might in time be his wife, so pretty as she was and so much better in her manner- quite a lady. Lucy made no resistance. She was passive in his clasp, but her pretty head just-as it were unconsciously—dropped a little to his broad (Shoulders, and her eyes met his pleadingly. So pleading were they, that Georgo understood them at once. They appeared to ask him not to take advantage of her repentance, but to treat her well because he might win her if he chose. He was sorely tempted to kiss her, and mado as if to do so- shs never preventing him but he did not venture, and he let her go. She was disappointed, and a shade of annoyance crossed her face. She had counted on that, for she knew George Collier's nature, and felt that she might win him by permitting a caress, for which she did not care the least, except inasmuch as he might be attracted by it, and do as she required him to do. A pupil of the Syren Vivien was Lucy Layton. Collier released her with a jerk; and, as a man of his temperament might be expected to do, he kept at a distance now. He would not trust himself within reach of the woman he still loved, for he felt he might offend. But he did not know how much she wished he would offend, so that he might be made submissive; but all of course within most proper bound*. II suppose I'd better go. I don't know what people will say if they knew I was here. I can, perhaps, get a bod at the inn. though it is late." Yes, the house is pretty well closed up by now," replied George, standing hel; lessly aloof, wishing to be, but not daring to go, near her. Ye can't remain here, Lucy." No, and the child wants looking after," she answered. The child!- chill. George had quite forgotten that. She was a wife and mother; what business had he to kiss her or to love her now ? The mention of the child brought all his manhood back to its proper <hannel, and George Collier was himself again. He had bcn very nearly carried away, but the old love had been put aside. Lucy perceived what was passing in his mind, and her be' ter instincts recognised the restraint which he put upon himself, though. it was no part of hOT tortuous policy to permit him to go scot free. His care and protection—his assistance at any rate—was necessary for her, and she determined to make use of him. Where am I to go, thi,n she asked simply. 'Of course I can't go to your house, I)ut- 1' No, -I suppose nor," he answered, scarcely heeding what he said, as his attention was taken up by his duties, "No, ye can't go to my house," he added, more steadily there would be fine gossip." ■f 11 What do I care for gossip, she said. And now, George Collier, I've something to ask of you; nobody tells me truth about it. Where's father P" "Your father? Jack Raymond, d'ye mean? Why, don't ye know, Mrs. Layton ?" "Know—what? Don't call me Mrs. Layton, George. I don't know anything, I went to find him, and he wasn't at home." "Yes; he is at home," replied George, solemnly. He is at home. He'll never come back here again. | He's dead." "Dead! Dead! Oh, George Collier, ye don't mean that ? Tell me now.- at once ? She was greatly excited and perplexed. Ho remained silent, and in the few moments which elapsed, the whirring noise of the blazing gas was distinctly heard by both. P I Yes he was killed on the railway the very Ilight you ran away with that soldier." t. "Yes. Goon; goon. God help me!" f Well, _that night—three years ago, nearly, I gupb,oise it is-h saw a gbost-an appearance.

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[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]