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NO ROBBERY.

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NO ROBBERY.

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f the Towers, and' no body 'not even his wife, had succeeded in changing his nom nclature. Sir Walter was now hppy. The estates of the Deanes and his own (by purchase) would be united in the family. He could run a line throus.h the estate and double the value. His son should be a. millionaire and rume it with the best. Be should go to Harrow, or Eton and Oxford, and ester the Church. He should have the living in the neigh- bourhood, for Sir Walter had influence, and the cosv corner was in the gift of the lo;d of the manor. These p:ans were all made, and when Sir Walter Watsjn took the trouble to make plans, nobody (except L'tdy Watson) ever induced him to unmake them, or to turn away from his object. Where is Walter ? inquired he of his wife. I want him." Down at those horrid workshops, I suppose," replied her ladyship, whose father had been in the meat line, and, having accumulated much cash, had got knighted for assisting the Queen from her car- riage when she opened a new People's Park, and who had then cut the shop and never come again. So Lady W&t.'?on—once Mar'a Copping—was extremely grand and aristocratic. Knew the peerage by heait, and felt extremely uncomfortable whm she was alone in society. At home she peeked at her husband, and worried him not a. little. "Those horrid workpeople were really too great a trial for her nerves. We have been particular in describing the Watsons, because in the course of this narrative we shall see a good deal of them. The Towers was beautifully situated in a commanding eminence, and the view, when not obscured by the "moke from the terrible shops, was lovely and of considerable extent, the sea being a beautiful background to a really charmi)g picture in nature's best style. I will go down to the works and see whether the boy is there. He ought to be better employed." said Sir Walter. It is his holiday time, and I am sure the child I is not doing any harm, replied Lady Watson, somewhat inconsistently, though the association with workpeople and railroad stokers is not the best for him, I allow." TMs gentle rap at the patient husband, whoga father had been a great railway foreman and con- tractor, and who had actually made his great fortune out of the very line of which his son was chairman, did not produce any reply at the moment, unless some nearly inaudible murmurings concerning butchers and beggars on horseback," concluding I with a word which possibly had reference to some Holland capital stock, could be called a reply. Then Sir Walter left the room, and banged the door behind him. He made his way on foot to the great workshops by a private path through the domain whith led him across the railway. He was about to cross it when a loud whistling arrested him. He stopped in obedience to the signal, and as the enormous 11 expres locomotive went past, without a tra'.n, he re''ognised, perched upon the foot- plate, his son !.nd heir, his hand on the whistle, de- lighted at the idea of "funking the governor" a3 Ire said to his friend, Robert Cooper, the driver of tl.e engine. "(he &hook his walking-stick at the lad, and the engiiie-drh'er touched bis hat in acknow- ledgment as the engine passed on to the next station. Sir Walter 1hrm crossed the rails, and, skirting the canal, came to a under-pafh which led him to a gate in a hi?h walL Insidu this wall were the shops, and he entered, scarcely heeding the admonition that stared him in the face as he passed in, BEWARE OF THE SHUNTINfr ]NRIKT' With the knowledge of the locality, begotten of custom, the great nun threaced his way through a labyrinth of superannuated waggons without wheels, and wheels without anything to support except themselves, and seemingly almost inca; able of that, for they were 1 corner ve paupers thrust into the rail- way på, r-house ;'nd fo:poLt.n by their connections. pi)ed in another pb),ce—"s rap" it is called—and it v'il! be sold some day at a good price. Beyond were lines f.'a.rri;)ges waiting repairs, for there WetS a carnage attached to the j o Jr-h, u<o." and hero the "cars" vere carefully repaired and overhauled. All kinds or trucks were v.s;blc farther o:), some..laden with ccal, other. ofipty and a whol; line of tender.?, without engine?, looking very ru.-ty and fors:tken: and engines with- out tend' rs, look'ngfor all the world like birds which had had their tails polled out. Across more sidings where o'd locomotives had come t) a stop for over; their ra. e was Dm. No more shall that swift-running Lightning nash along'the rails withh8r Majesty's m:ÜI, no more shall that great-driving-whaol, six feet six inches in diameter, revolve at express speed to carry the news of a b tttle into the country with the papers.. Its day is dom-; its sun basset. The rust Hi-on the wheels, the open !urna e door, the pipes in front all choked with dnst aud bi',s of stone, and the open man hole," where a enturesome bi: d h .d made hf'r nest and reared her young, all told the secret of decay. "Unto' scrap' shalt thou return.' Passing ilie.,ic skeletons and the unconnected wheels—the chimney pensioners of the locomo- tive department—Sir Walter Watson made hia way to the erecting shop, where some new engines are being built, and here he .finds a perfectly new loco- motive, all brave in brass and paint, and c'oan as rubbing and oil can make her. This is Ins pet vanity. We are all mortal; and Sir Walter had a weak place. This beautiful piece of machinery was nearly ready to come out. Her name had been put on that morning. She was called Walter Watson, by way of a delicate ompliment t) the chairman; and she was the one thousandth engine the company had n aile. We will leave him to contemplate and examine h's namesake, and turn to th<; r'uiway for a few moments, and take up the thread of the narrative at the signal-box. CHAPTER XII. AN EXPLANATION HETWJEEN J'JtrENDS—A SURPRISE WE must go back to the evening when Lucy Ray- mond ran away, and bring the tale up to the later date. When the train had passed on, the mangled re- mains of poor Raymond were co lected and carried to the hospital to await a formal inquiry, and Bill Bostley was the bearer of the news of Lucy's elope- ment to George Collier as already related in the first chapter. He did not mention the death of Jack Raymond, believing tint Collier would be as good as hia word, and strangle h'm. For such a fate Bostley the. Breman had no taste.

NO ROBBERY.