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NO ROBBERY.

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[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 1 NO ROBBERY. BY HENRY FRITH. ',Author o/ Me ]If.1jsteI'Jf o/ 310op Fa;'m," On the Wi2ims of the Wind," I'Izi-oieylz Flood, l'hrough li'il f," fc., &c. CHAPTER XI. t. MIGHTY, ],fJWNIFICENT, THREE-TAILED BASHAV/. "DEAR me, how very extraordinary!" exclaimed Sir Walter Watson as he sat at breakfast—"dear me! Nothing- cotdd have fallen out better. It seems almost as if Providence had arranged matters for us." Don't talk nonsense, Walter," replied his lady and very lady-like wife; "you ought to know better. As if Providence would think of interfering ;n——" "My dear, hush! Remember the servants, and ililst after prayers, too Really I must—1 really must MMM'i;———" "What is the matter? "inquired Lady Watson, fOterrupting her spouse. What made you ex- claim just now? Anything in the Railroad Market ?" No, no; certainly not. Dear me! You re- member our arrangement—jokingly put, of course— respecting Captain—I mean Colonel DeaneF" "Oh, yes; about the childi\n. 7 was quite serious, I assure you. The Deanes are an old family, and you are not of a very ancient One——" "Look here, Maria, I must say thit you are speaking in a very unbecoming' manner. My father—— Yes, yes; we know all about the hte contractor. Sir Edwnrd was a good and a very worthy man, but (toarcely—well not quite the equal of Colonel Dc'ane. When my dear mother first mot him she thought him very provincial indeed. Now what has made you so ('1'0'.$ r" "Cross! You are enough to vex a saint, Maria. No wonder I'm eros 1. But listen; here's an announce- ment in the paper: Mrs. Deane, wife of Colonel Deane, V.C., and all the rest of it, a son and heir I Don't you see, Lily and he are just of an age. She is two days old. r/' remarked Ladv Watson, gimeiug at the paper her husband banded to her. To be sure that is no great matter. But it'is uso- ess speculating on such children." "However, the :ur.'mgement would be a. very good one for both sides. Deane has always been very civil to me, and I must say I think I am not behindhand in courtesy. Yos it will do—very cicely indeed." I wonder when Mrs. Deane is coming back ? There have been rumours of shipwreck and acci- dent, but she must have returned, else this an- nouncement could not Inve been insetted in the y?tM. Shall we caU f asked Lady Watson. Yes: it would be as well to inquire at any rate. Let us arrange to do so to-morrow if you arc dis- engaged," ieplied her submissive husband. And then the meal proceeded without any further special conversation, Sir Walter being buried in the news- paper and Lady Watson sitting gazing from the window waiting until her housekeeper came to &ay that certain domestic concerns needed her authority. We must not imagine from the glimpse of Sir Walter Watson that he was alvnys as quiet and submissive as he appeared at home. There were few people who did not nnd out the rough side of his tongue. He was a really great man in the neighbourhood of—————. The village inhabited by the workpeople at the shops as the engine factory was called—belonged to him. He had instituted a church and forbade anyone to go to chapel in pain of his high displeasure, but many went all the same. He had a post-oQice, a school, a publichouse—only one-a reading- foom, and a recre;tii"ii room, with all mcdern amusements laid on for the leisure hours of the tenantry who voted for him in the election to a man- or nC:'1rly so-.for Sir Walter never bribed anyone, nor would he per- mit any apparent interference with a voter. But it was generally understood that Mr Walter ought to be supported as a Liberal member, and he was, until he was oSended at. some Parlhnnentary inter- ference, and then he changed his politics and gained 0. baronetcv. This gave rise to some little discussion; and when the next general election came. Sir Walter put up as Conservative, and was duly returned A petition was lodged, but not a tittle of evidence was forthcoming respecting any act'of intimidation o bribery, and the commissioner returned a, "cL an bill of health to the new member. Thus Sir W:dt- r retained his seat and his Inuuence like a modern Vicar of Bray. From these few particulars it may be gathered that this railway magnate was really and trulv a great man—that is a great man Lcally, and In a business sense not physically. Personally, tho baronet was short and incHned to stoutn',s He had a nrm-set countenance and a clear head. He was generally well dressed as became a. magnate, and rather prided himself upon bis short stature, for he remembered that all gn.at men in history were physically small. But to see him at his greatest you should attend a meeting at which he was chairman. Then he came out in his, truest and most dazzling colours. He literally sat upon the Board. Not a direct) r, not a shareholder, dared to ask any question as to accounts or procedure. Sir Walter was quite equal to any emergency, and resented inquiry as ft personal insult. The unfortunate man who ventured Within reach of the lion's paw was severely handled and sarcastic remarks with angry repartee or retort was usually the lot of the enterprising bondholder or shareholder in any con ern iu which the "many- headed chairman held a prominent position. Yet with al] this he was a kind]yman,veryfondof }us son and heir, Edward, who had been destined for the Church from infancy, but whose talents lay more in the engineering line." He was still quite a lad, and had Colonel Deane's chHd been a girl, Sir Walter would have brought about, the match equally, for he was fond of the aristocracy, particularly Fjnee he had b come ft. Conservative, and had serious thoughts of Stgning himself -Watson." like a p-cr ?The Towers," where he lived, wa.s'e!egantlv fur? ptshed and appointed. W?hy it had been'called the Towers nobody-not even the oldest inhabitant .-could tell. Not a turret was viable, and nothing *)roachrngtothe outward .semMa-uce of a tower < within a mile of the house, and that was ony a Rut Sir Walter hked

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NO ROBBERY.

NO ROBBERY.