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NO,t ROBBERY,

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[Alt BIGHTS NO,t ROBBERY, HENRY FRITH, r* • Author of II The Mystery of Moor Farm," 11 On fasi Wings of the Wind," "Through Floodr Through v Fire? dc.. &c. X CHAPTER VIIL REBELLION. WE must now descend to mere historical facts, and before proceeding with our narrative-which we may add is not altogether imaginative—give our readers a brief resumi of the scenes which had led to guch reprisals as we have described in the foregoing chapter. Such executions were common enough in India in 1857.8; and any one who was serving in the Peninsula during those dreadful years will, we think, bear us out in saying that the narrative is certa'nly not too highly coloured. The Enfield rifle, then lately introduced into the jjative regiments, was the ostensible cause of the great Indian Mut ny. The cartridge requires some lubricating substance, and the Sepoy delined4to use f an arm which had to be smeared with the fat of a Cow, an animal he held in the greatest veneration. Fort William was the first place in which the Areadful rumour gained ground. A native soldier told his friends, and in January the telegraph at 13anackpore was destroyed. Then the 19th N. I. broke out, and was with difficulty repressed. The 84th N. I. followed suit, and were then dis- banded. The idea of losing caste was the pre- vailing one amongst the Sepoys, and the news quickly spread over India. English troops were hurried out, and the 19th Queen's Regiment from England was sent to Calcutta to take the place of the rebellious 19th N; I., as we have cause to remember. At Meerut things were coming to a head. On the $th of May a parade was ordered, but the men refuse to receive the cartridges, even of the old pattern. Those who declined were brought to trial, and condemned. They were sentenced to various long terms of imprisonment; "During that came night the Native Light Cavalry and one or two Sepoy regiments laid their plans for mutiny; but they were in too great a hurry. Had they-waited they might have done more. Before the time agreed upon, the cavalry took the initiative and released all the prisoners in the gaol. The bungalows were fired, and volleys of small arms, with the yells of the maddened Sepoys, announced the terrible fact that the Indian Mutiny had com- menced. The English force at Meerut appeared for the time paralysed; nothing was done, and before sunset the mutineers had initiated all the dreadful scenes which afterwards became so horribly common in India, and escaped at once to Delhi. They were admitted and then joined by the Sepoys in the city. The English could only blow up the great magazine and retire. Then the news reached Simla, and the orders were issued to concen- trate at Umballa to besiege the city of Delhi. We will now resume our narrative. Such was the condition of things when Colonel Peane was ordered to Umballa to take. command of a pative regiment which had shown itself disorderly and mutinously inclined. There was a strong European force there, and the colonel was hurriedly Summoned. He had only time to make hasty arrangements for the transfer of his wife to England with a trusty Ayah, when he was obliged to set off in command of an armed Sepoy regiment in the direction pf Delhi. This may now appear to us as putting one's head into the lion's mouth. It looked very bad for Colonel Peane, and he himself felt he was with his officers going to certain death. The feelings of his comrades did not tend to reassure him; but why the men were not disarmed, nobody could say. However, the march began and continued. Nothing particular occurred until the force arrived within a march of Delhi, and then a disinclination to remain under restraint made itself m nifest. The colonel was reposing after the fatigues of the day, when the camp was startled by the sound of an explosion. What could it mean ? Colonel Dcane was a brave and determined man. He rose and went calmly through the camp, and tinding all quiet, fancied some accident had happened, and was proceeding onward, when his course was Suddenly arrested by some Sepoys and a native Sergeant. I' Don't go on," cried the latter; go back, sir, go back." "Whvp" inquired the colonel. "What is the matter ?" The men are armed. They have mutinied. Go back-quickly." This well-meant advice was immediately acted ipporl. The colonel hastened to his tent, and his groom saddled his horse, the faithful sergeant still keeping watch. Suddenly a volley was heard, the native rushed away, followed by another volley from the men now rapidly approaching. No time was to be lost. All was confusion and uproar. Many Sepoys were asleep, and were only aroused by the firing. Ready tojoin or unwilling to stem the torrent, the majority of the riaiive soldiers threw in their lot with the band of rnuti peers, and the little band of officers made all haste to get their horses saddled and escape if possible. Colonel Deane had no time to lo-e. Without Waiting to dress he leaped into the saddle and rode away as fast as he could, harassed by the bullets, but uninjured, and in a short time all the European officers fonnd themselves assembled, concealed in the jungle, to wait for nightfall, and to take counsel. 1 They determined to proceed to Delhi, but there was a doubt about the path. If the enemy were in force the Europeans would only escape out of the frying pan into the fire." An anxious look-out was kept all night, while the glare of the burning tents, the explosion of the magazine, with howls, crie:" and Shouts made darkness hideous. After a while it was determined that they should Bet out, and they marched together for some time fllmost a1; random. They had made considerable yrogress, however, when a rustling was heard in the bushes, and a half-naked figure came suddenly forth.. The foremost horseman reined up and halted instantly. N Who goes there ? cried the man in English. Who are you ? was the not unnatural rejoinder. Never mind, I can do you a service or not, as you please. My men are hero."

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NO,t ROBBERY,

NO,t ROBBERY,