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X was at the dance that evening that Layton apptared tt civitat costtfne and mat Soutar at He supper table. He had learnt enough to make hint angry, and tha other ]Lad had enough champagne to make him quaireloome. We can, perhaps, ima- <pn< thtt meeting. Thw nrst supper had passed over. The MM* had gone home, and at an early hou* of the m<rming the men sat down to their real supper, and a very noisy one it was. The young non-commissioned officer bided his time. He had watched Soutar and his wife, and had taxed her with her vilisconduct. Soutar was too tipsy to be discreet, and vHan Airing supper he was boasting ofl his innuence in a certain quarter, Layton turned, and coolly and deliberately gave him tne lie direct. "What did you aay?" cried Soutar, angrily rising. I say that's a lie," repeated the injured hus- band. No more was needed. Soutar sprang at his enemy, aa he deemed him, and an unseemly struggle would have taken place had not both the men been held back by main force. The Major, who was present, was obliged to order both combatants under arrest, but they heeded him not. Soutar turned upon him violently, and a terrible uproar ensued. v,, The principals in the quarrel wereiwith dimculty kept apart; and at length, losing all command over himself, Layton rushed suddenly forward and struck his antagonist ajjheavy blow. Take that, you lying scoundrel! he cric<L It will teach you to traduce men's wives again. My name is Layton. I am that lady's husband." A dread silence fell upon all who heard these worda and witnessed the anair. Not a sound was heard as Soutar, completely sobered, by the Mow, wiped his ftce, and with a smile of savage satisfaction, replied: Very well, Sergeant Layton. I know you now. You will consider yourself under arrest. I call upon you all here to bear witness he has struck his superior oSicer, and he will be tried by court- martial. You know the result most probably." Layton turned pale aa death as he noted the vin- dictive glance'that accompanied this speech. The whole truth was now disclosed. Mrs. Layton was after all only the wife of a quartermaster.sergeant, and her future at Mussuri was quite untenable. The circumstances were, however, not known generally until the following morning, and then the occurrence of the evening before was the talk of the whole station. How had the husband obtained the admittance to the club ? How was it possible that Layton had left his CJrps and come up unannounced and unexpected to Mussuri just at that time ? No one could answer these questions, and yet it is certain that he had received acme infonMtion which led to. his audden ttppeMMce. What would Mrs. Ltyton do P? Her name was now bandied about in a most unceremonioua way, and being only a non commissioned omcer's wife, of courae her offence was dreadful. She had also thrust herself into a situation and endeavoured to gain a position amongst her betters, and even if, as people said, her husband had been lately advanced [ to commissioned rank as quartermaster, he had not been gazetted. Of course ladies could not aeaociate with Mrs. Layton. Her character was torn to shreds before she left Muasun. Those who had not fancied her at any time were now, of course,* exceedingly bitter, and even the men-the civilians up there-no longer cared to meet her. Major Deane was the only person who showed her any kindness; but Mrs. Layton, believing he had been the cause of all the scandal, spumed him, and said aome very indignant tmd cruel things. You have ruined my life amongst you. If you had not interfered with me I might have been, at any rate, spared the humiliation I am now suffering from. Go-I don't want to see you again." But hear me for your husband's sake, if not for your own, for your future is clouded at present." Yes, and you have clouded it. Leave me, please, Major Deane. I can hate pretty well, and it is to you I owe my humiliation. I am going to join my husband, but depend upon it, if ever I can revenge myself upon you, I will." Nonsense," was the somewhat stem reply. "You had better join your husband at Sealkote as soon as you can. He will be tried by court-martial, but no doubt under the circumstances will be acquitted or let off easily. Let me help you." I tell you I hate and detest you, and if I were starving, which thank goodness 1 am not, or in want of money, I would not accept a rupee from you or yours. Why couldn't you leave me alone F I I acted for the best. I wished to save that silly I Soutar from making a fool of himself and you. I am pledged to look after him, and I have only carried out my trust. You seem to forget that you are married, and he is a boy." "I forget nothing-I never sha<I, and you shall some day leam that I can hate. My husband is quite assured, and you know that no barm evercame from my nirtation. Every woman nirts here. Why should I have been alone humiliated ? Leave this house if you please, or I will write to your wife and tell her how yoMhave sought me. That would be a sweet revenge." The Major started. He had certainly committed himself a little In appearance, but all with the best intentions. It is those who act with the best inten- tions, without considering whether their interference is necessir 'v or not, who get into scrapea. "Yp c-f a bad, wicked woman, I am afraid," he answered Æly, and I wash my hands of yon." Your. hands are not' eo clean after all," she re- torted. \Ve shall yet meet, and I will pay my debt if I die to it." All tht j H in her nature appeared to have been roused, a.!fd she atood Bushed and angry before the abashe < cer like a beautiful fairy. Opening the door s* c motioned to the well-mining but over* zealous ? 'r?tp leave the house. By (;<ilf'( 'r meet, of the residents were thinking of retum'n t" he plains. Tbw season has had its victims.' ;-iay and passion. More than one duel had been fcu'rht, and one of the combatants had befn killed. r:Jr:'};cments were also well represented in the listofc's. Twoladicawho hadbeenspeci&My angry "s.h?t Mrs. Layton, as she calls herself, had 1 '!r husbands, and Soutar congratulated himsel n he was summoned to Calcutta aa a witness me action, that he had not; ?:gured as a princip mother. He had learnt his lesson. hiea", s ntence had been pronounced upon Laytoi however, had been permitted to withh in quarters pending the assembling of the co' Hal. Sheh&d the candour to confeM her abh rhe bmineM. and told'him all the truths

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