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I CARNARVONS NEW FREEMANI…

PUBLIC BANQUET.

WALES' MOTTO: "ONWARD."

MEMORIAL TO ARCHDEACON EVANS

THE NEW FREEMAN

TO FIGHT CONSUMPTION

LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS.

F NOW TO DESTROY THE DANDRUFF…

MEGAN LLOYD GEORGE

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MEGAN LLOYD GEORGE A DARING SCEPTIC AT FIVE YEARS OF AGE! Mr T. P. O'Connor, M.P.. contributes to th's month's "Munsey's Magazine" an intimate study of the Chancellor of the 'Exchequer. In his personal life (he writes). Lloyd George preserves the habits c.f his austere youth. You see no tasseled footman around his dwelling, whether in No. 11, Downing- street, or in the modest little hous, that he occupies in Brighton for rest and golf at week-ends. Two or three maidservants from his native Wales, and a delightful, simple Irish boy—who is a strong politician on the Irish Nationalist side-make up the house- hold..He has allowed himself but' one luxury ever since he had the salary of £ 5000 a year. As that is a small motor-car, I13 may be forgiven for it; for without soma such contrivance he could not get through all the many engagements of his very busy life His household life is one of' the most de- lightful things about Lloyd George. His wife is of that type of Celtic "little mother" that is to be found in Welsh and Irish ht,mes-simple, unselfish, calm, helpful; so anxious to be of service to everybody that often you may see her rising from her seat ab table to help one of her guests. He has two sons, one of whom-a charming, hand- some, gentle-faced boy—is at Cambridge; the other is still at school. Above and beyond all his gifts of fortune, Lloyd George has Megan. Megan is like some creation of the weird fancy of J. M. Bairie, gnome almost more than child, sprite rather than human girl. In her you can see many of the qualities of the father reproduced—his wondrous precocity, his love of fun, his humour. Like all Celts, Megan dwells in a land of visions. One of her quaint fancies is to represent herself as different personalities. She speaks of these fancies as if they were reality. Now she tells you thatshi is Dorothy Jones, a young lady at school; then she is Kate Duffy, an Irish maid, and finally Megan Lloyd George. Her conversations with her father bring 0111, some of those strangely precocious ideas that flit across the kaleidoscopic brain of childhood. One day he receives from her some pence that he professes to have lent her. The debt is not yet due. He says — "Remember, Megan, there are, according to a Welsh proverb, two kinds of bad payers —the payer who pays too soon, and the payer who does not pay at all." "And what," she asks, "about those who pay back?" On Sunday, she asks her father to tell her some stories. Lloyd George is still Nonconformist and Welsh enough to have a special respect for the Sabbath, and he does not. play golf on that day. Accordingly, he tells her not profane, but sacred stories— perhaps the tale of Daniel in the lion's den. After a time she stops him, and says re- proachfully "Oh, father, do tell me something sensible!" This daring sceptic is five years old

GOLF

SHIPPING

.A STUBBORN PAIENT

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HAD NEVER FORGOTTEN WALES.

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WESLEYAN BAZAAR.

STALL HOLDERS.

UNSIGHTLY HULKS AT CARNARVON.

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FATAL QUAiRlRY ACCIDENT. -J

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