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-==: CHViiLOG NEW SCHOOL OPENED ADDRESS Bi MR. LLOYD GEORGE. On Saturday afternoon, and Irs, Lloyd George took part in the opening of a new school, erected by the Carnarvonshire Education Committee, at Chwilog. The school, which has been built on the corridor w e i system, has cost £ 1,8G0, ot which £ 1,000 will come from the Government. There was a very large attendance, the proceedings being presided over by -Ur. Wil- liam George, Criccieth, a member ot the (Education Uuinmitiee. tie was supported bv Mr. and Mr*. u«orge, -ut" ^rrnau d tne r>uUauig ,om- nliteej, -ui'. tvaa K. Davies ,o in. jiduc^tion Oouumues), Mr. Maurice dones, Pwllheu, o. '1, JOMS) Cr^eth; an. 9>Mi!" Cbaries H. Darbishire, referring to the ouajjwuiut sometimes heard un ooca^qns ct that kind, that- the Education Committee spent too much money OIl the scÍlOWS, saui tnat it was generally made by people wno Lived outside the msmct. Those wno lived arouacune schools never complained (cheers). The discontent was probably due to the desire of every district to secure what. an- other ut, out the committee couid not deal all places at the same time. They were now onw beginning tne.r work, and it therefore behoved them to proceed cautious- ly. To say that the committee were pro- viding too tine buildings, and that tnen' views were altogether to wide was the great- est mistake imaginable. They were deter- mined in all cases to provide for the require- ments of a district for ten or twelve years to come (cheers), hi conclusion he paAi a tribute to the excellent services rendered to the committee by its secretary {Ir. E. R. Davies), to whori he attributed much of the success oi the educational movement in Car- narvonshire. He then presented Mrs. Lloyd George with a silver key with which to open the school.. Mrs. Lloyd George then duly proclaimed the school open, and addressed the gather- ing in Welsh. It gave her a great pleasure to°perform the opening ceremony. Wales was working admirably in the matter of pro- viding education for her childien. While Wales contributed 5s 8id per head towards education. Scotland only contributed 4s 10d, England 3s, and Ireland ld (laugh- ter). Alluding to the arrangements for teaching Welsh in the schools, she could have wished that examinations, in the se- condary schools had been easier in order that the children might take up the study of Welsh more generally. She also though that too many Welsh children were trained for the teaching profession, and that conviction had been forced upon her in an especial manner by wiit.Tijes.sing some 200 students receiving their degrees at Bangor the previous day. If they were all meant for the teaching pro- fession she wondered how they cojuld all be employed. Many more, she believed, might be trained for various branches of the Civil Service (hear, hear). EDUCATION THE SLANG OF WALES. Mr. Lloyd! George then followed with a short speech, also in Welsh. He observed that he oouild net conceive of a more omport- ant occasion to a district than the opening of a new school, when the people of the loca- iity felt that the school belonged to them. One thing they disliked in the old system was that they had no sense of possession, but it was different when they had a school established and controlled by the people. It was a rich heritage for their children, for the future of Wates depended largely upon those schools. He had been forcibly struck by the fact that the spirit of the school, the spirit of education, permeated Wales from end to end. Education was now in Wales the subject of everyday conversation among not only a- select circle of educationists, but among- tha common people. The man in the street talked education in Wales. Education had become a part of the slang of Wales. He admitted; that it was a new spirit even in Wales, but he was proud of it, and ventured to say that the future greatness of the country lay in it (hear, hear). Germany loomed large on the horizon these days. Some people were afraid of Germany, others threatened it. Germany was a great coun- try, and its influence, though now great, would become greater, but we in this coun- try need not be afraid of her. What had made Germany what it is? To say that it was her army, her navy, or her Emperor, was a mistake. It was none of these things Rather it was her schools and colleges, which enabled) her children to climb from the low- est rung of the ladder to the most coveted places, and that in spite of poverty and humble surroundings (cheers). In Wales th: soil had been prepared by the chapels, and now the turn of the schools had com0. He Appealed to the inhabitants of that locality to take a special pride in this school, and to realise that it was not to be managed en- tirely by the county authority, excellent though the members of that body might be. Let them not be frightened by the cry of high rates. Inferior education was the dearest thing which a country could ever buy, and, on the other haud, the best educa- tion was. after all. the cheapest (cheers). By means of her schools he anticipated that Wales wouM raise an army of thinkers and workers which would be the admiration and envy of the whole world (cheers). Further remarks were made by Messrs. Maurice Jones and J. T. Jones, Criccieth, and Mrs. Jones (CeTidwen Peris). On the motion of the Rev. Alun T. Jones, Chwilog. seconded by rr. David Roberts, Brynhyfryd. and supported by Ir. Evan -R. Davies, a. hearty vote of thanks was accord- ed Ir, and Mrs. Lloyd George for taking part in the opening ceremony. The proceedings terminated with the ren- dering of the Welsh (National Anthem by the children. THE CHANCELLOR AND THE EDUCA- TION CONTROVERSY. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd-George left ChwiJlog for Criccieth by motor, and in the evening attended the re-openitig services of the Criccieth School. The chair was occupied joy the Rev J. Owen, Criccieth, and notably among others present were Archdeacon Lloyd Jones and Air. Richard Lloyd, the Chancel- lor's uncle. The Chairman and Mr. Darbi- shire having brieily addressed the gathering, the latter presented) the Chancellor with a copy of the county educational ibibie, as he described At. Subsequently Mr. Lloyd Georcre was callted upopi to address the meet- ia, He touched upon his early associations with the town. Reminding his audience of the old school which formerly stepd ih the square he observed that it was in a de- bating society. which met on those premises, that he had his first lessons as a Parliamen- tarian, and he was pleased to find the leader of that society present at that meeting in the person of Mr. Roberts (Llew Glas), the clerk of the works of the renovated school (cheers). He had not realised that he was an educated man till Oxford conferred upon him a degree (laughter). Oxford had found that out even before his own people (laug ter)—but he had now been honoured by the University of his own land (hear, hear). As yet he had nqt received' his D,D. and he had some misgiiving that he would not get it until he visited America (laughter). With regard to the education conflict, it would conduce more to the true interests of educa- tion to have an agreement between the par- ties concerned than that one party should achieve victory at the expense of ruthliassly trampin-z upon the feelings of the other (cheers). Reiterating what he said at Chwilog. the right hon. gentleman said that the future cif the country depended: upon the quality of the education given to the children. It was incumbent upon parents to grtfdre all the sacrifice they could in order to -+- keep their children in school as lojig as pos- » sible. Zeal for education was one of Wales' proudest possessions, and there was nothing which had more impressed lr. Runciman after his recent visit to Towyn than the re- markable enthusiasm which characterised the Welsh democracy in all that appertained to education (cheer.4). Then Messrs. E\:in R. Davies and J. T. Jones, Cricciieth. briefly addressed the gath- ering, and. on the motion of Mr. Burneli, seconded by Ir, W. Wat-kin, and supported I by Archdeacon Lloyd Jones, a vote of thanks was accorded lr. illoyd George. On the motion of Mr. Lloydi George a vote of thanks was accorded the chairman.

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