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. MERTHYR AND CARNARVON

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MERTHYR AND CARNARVON The member for Merthyr Tydfil, the "suc- cessor of Henry Richard, is well-fitted by hjs conspicuous ability, his cultivated intelligence, gold his great wealth to .be a commanding officer pf high rank in the [Progressive army. His Influence in Wales was at one time considerable, and by now might have been very great. Some- how, he has lost his way. Somewhen, he •icfeviated from the true path. He has made the mistake of those who miss the target by too much eagerness for 'hitting the bull's-eye. Mr [Lloyd-George, on the other hand (by Jeading torlorn hopes, and imperilling, not only popu- larity, buij also life and limb in defence of his principle) has become the tribune of the Cymric nation, the spokesman of the Nonconformists of Great Britain, and a Cabinet. Minister of power and weight. (What a contract! The initial advantages were all -in favour of Mer- thyr. The final result if; decisive in favour of Carnarvon. Mr P. A. Thomas is not the only Welsh member who has made the Eerious mis- take of -taking the wrong turn at the 'parting of ways. There were others. Some of them were .subject to temptations which could not assail the member for Merthyr; and many excuses may be made for them. But who will undertake to write an "apologia" for the mem- ber for Merthyr? A few days ago mysterious paragraphs were published in the daily papers—-particularly in the Tory papers—alleging that the meetings of the Welsh party were mainly spent in bicker- ings. Much nonsense has been written as to the Welsh Party." Now, if the term con- notes an organisation Isimilar to the Irish Party, it ,is quite unsuitable. Such a salaried, pledge- bound party subject to a Self-denying Ordin- ance of the most stringent kind does not exist amongst the members for Wales. It will be ,040n enough to talk of it when Mr D. A. Thomas, or some other imitator of "T.P. shall have collected or otherwise provided a Welsh Parliamentary Fund' of £ 20,000. But though there is no Welsh Party, on the Irish model, there ought to be a very useful and powerful bond of union amongst the represen- tatives of Wales. No doubt there aTe groups no doubt, some members are tempted to "play off their own bats"; no doubt, there are dis- cussions on matters of tactics, and even dis- sensions on weightier matters. Wales does not expect—does, not even desire—the unanimity of drilled conscripts. The members are not galley (slaves. But they row in the same boat; and they ought voluntarily, to pull together and pay a reasonable regard to the coxswain. In a conversation, with a press correspondent, Mr Lloyd-George has given a conclusive answer to those who are inclined to belittle the Welsh Party, and to growl at various episodes in its history. For instance, take the growling as to the delay in the work of the Welsh Church Commission. 'Mr (Lloyd-George said That is not the fault of the Commission. It is due to the fact that although the Com- mission was announced anoaths a.go witnesses are not yet ready .with their evidence. If those gentlemen who tcomplain wish to ex- pedite the business of the Commission, they joouLd have done so long ago by taking a. greater interest -than they have done in get- ting together and aiding in the preparation of that evidence. A member of (Parliament has not exhausted) his duties to his constitu- oenf.6 when he has merely criticised the work done by others. He is also expected to help, and I shall be curious to find out how much assistance in the preparation of evidence has been given by the most active critics of the Disestablishment Commission. I have a very shrewd notion on the subject myself." Mr XJoyd-George finished his statement with a far-reaching observation: "Every party may be roughly divided into workers and grumblers. Those who work have no time to grumble and ihose who grumlble have no disposition of capa- city fQr work." For some reason, or lack of reason, Mr. D, A. Thomas has concluded that Mr Lloyd-George meant that cap for his head. In a long communication to the press,- the member for Merthyr suggests other dichotomies —workers and talkers; selfish' patriots and self-sacrificing patriots; and so forth. He proceeds to complain that the good work done by Welsh member's has been done by them as individuals ,and not as a party. There is much truth in that observation, yet it may be maintained that the Welsh members who have been most active and successful are just those who have been most zealous for the unity of Wales. As to the relative positions— in 1894 and in lgo&Of Welsh Disestablish- ment, Mr Thomas regretfully holds Mr Lloyd- George responsible. But surely, if the revolt of 1894 was blameworthy, Mr D. A. Thomas, as one of the four revolters, must share the blame. He talks of the "failure of the Educa- tion Bill," and of the .postponement of Dis- fis cablíshment. This, to say the least, is "too vious." The whole letter is too clever, for ■. proves too much. iMr Thomas promises an- ther epistle. We hope it will remind us of ry Richard rather than of ThersJt.es. _n

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SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE

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MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE IN

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INOMINATION OF SHERIFFS

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REMARKABLE ANGLESEY SCENE…

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