Hide Articles List

15 articles on this Page

---------.-lOOAI ;;D GENERAL…

Advertising

_.-----._--| Pwllheli County…

News
Cite
Share

| Pwllheli County Court. ;W6.\T-.A Y.—Before His Honour Judge W. Evans. ACKNOWLEDGING A DEBT.—Messrs Hugh and Pierce Jones, Pwllheli, sued John Roberts, Wern, Nevin, for Cll 10s 6d, for goods sold and delivered. Mr A. Ivor Parry was for the plaintiffs, and Mr O. Robyn-s Owen for the defendant. The debt was over six years old, but the de- fendant had subsequently acknowledged it in writing. Judgment for the plaintiffs. CRICCIETH COUNCIL v. WILLIAM EDWARDS.—Mr John Humphreys, on behalf of the Urban Council of Criccietb, sued Mr WilPPtm Edwards, Sefton House, Cricouth, for the non-payment of i.4 ground rent, and 10s district rate. Mr Humphreys said that the Council had cer- tain property vested in them under the Criccieth Local Act. Part of the property was rented to Robert Poberts, who as- signed it to William Edwards, the present defendant. A previous summons was is- sued against the defendant on the same grounds, but the amount claimed was paid. —The def<ndant had a counter-claim.—Mr Humphreys quoted a section of the Act in which no action could be taken unless com- menced within ix months from the date the debt was contracted.—His Honour ruled agajin^t the counter-claim, which he al- lowed to be withdrawn.—Judgment for the plaintiff. RIGHTS OF HIGHWAY.—CLAIM FOR THE LOSS OF A MARE.—R. J. Griffith, Belle Vue, Sarn, claimed the value of a mare, which had met with a fatal accident at Sarn through the alleged negligence of defendant, Robert Jones, Bronphilip, Bo- twnog. Mr H. Lloyd Carter, Carnarvon, was for the claimant, and Mr Cledwyn Owen for the defendant. It was alleged that the shaft of defendant's trap penetra- ted the body of the plaintiff's which died in consequence. The value of the mare was put at £ 20, and the expenses at JB7 10s.—Claimant said that on October 30th last the mare and a spring cart were out with goods. He put the cart, with a. lighted lamp, at the side of the shop, and took the mare past the shop, which was lit up, towards the stable. He saw a trap coming towards him, and called out to the driver to stop. Had he taken the mare in- to the road she would have been more in the way of the traffic, and therefore he led her along the side. The shaft struck the mare near the groin, and she swerved round. Somebody took hold of Jones's horse. The mare got free somehow or other. The rgad was about 8 yards wide. The mare was within a yard and a half of the wall, but her hind part was more in the road than her head. When Griffith saw blood com- ing out of the wound, he cried out Robert Jones, you have bled her." Jones took no notice, and went on. Every effort was made to save the mare's life. Two veterin- ary surgeons attended her. Plaintiff went to see Jones, and asked him to come and see the mare. He promised to come on the Monday, but did not. When the mare died a letter was sent to Jones, who came to the shop, when the plaintiff's boy told him that he had killed the mare. The de- fendant said that the mare had swerved towards him. Complainant replied that she swerved after she was struck.—Cross- examined The night was dark and dirtv. Drivers kept to the left on the -road. He kept by the side of his shop.—Mr Owen contended that a man when leading a horse ought to be between the animal and a pass- ing vehicle, and not between the animal .and the hedge.-Plaintiff (continuing) said that a jockey had told him that it was no matter which side to lead the horse,-it de- pended which was the safer of the two.— Mr Owen: The jockey has made a rule of the road for you.—Plaintiff: His shop was lighted up like other shops. The mare was P", not restive, and she was not hipped. He would not have taken £ 30 for her. It would be absurd: to offer him ;C5.-Robert Wil- liam Griffith said that the trap did net stop until the shaft had penetrated the body of the mare, though R. J. Griffith shouted several times to the driver to keep clear or stop.—John Evan Jones, a boy, corrobo- rated.—Cross-examined The plaintiff had spoken to him about the case, and had asked him to speak t'he- truth (loud applause in Court).-Wi11iam Owen, Melin y Sam, deposed to being in plaintiff's shop on the night in question. He saw the mare pass- ing the shop door, and heard Griffith shouting. R. Jones kept more to the side than to the middle of the road. Witness rushed to the head of the mare..—John Watkin. lrygarn, and Mr Hughes, veter- inary surgeon, gave evidence in support of the plaintiff's case. The defence was that the claimant was on the wrong side of the road, and on the wrong side of the mare. The first thing that Jones saw was the mare kicking at his horse. Jones had taken every precaution, and the plaintiff could not make a coach hou,, yard of the high- road. It was alleged that the hind Quar- ters of the mare were in the middle of the road. The rule. of the read must be ob- served.—His Honour asked for evidence of specific negligence.—Mr Carter said that the defendant went along the wrong side of the road.^—Robert Jones, for the de- fence, deposed that he was in the trap going home. He drove slowly. The accident occurred near plaintiff's stable. The first thing he saw was a mare turning suddenly across the road. The shop window was full of some goods. If he had kept to the left his car would have turned over, owine to the steepness of the place. The car did not jerk. He could not say he was in the middle of the road. The mare's side was the first thing he saw, right before the shaft. The rule was to lead a horse be- tween a passing car and the horse. There was no light from the window and the stable. He never imagined that anything serious had! occurred, and went home.- Cross-examined: He .stopped the trap when he found th. shaft had struck the mare. He would have crossed over the road with the mare, and crossed back again to ftp to the stable, if he had been the plain- tiff. He did not drive quickly. He had met with two other trap accidents before. T. M. Jones, Penvbont Hotel, Sam, said that the defendant drove at the rate of 4 miles an hour. He always kept on the left with his trap. If he were taking a horse from the shop to the stable he would take it along the right side, though the distance was only about 90 feet.—Judg- ment was for the defendant. A CLAIM FOR LAMBS.—Hush Ro- berts, Custom House square, Pwllheli, sued G. Cornelius Roberts, butcher, Pwll- heli, for the recovery of £ 74 13s 6d, amount due for lambs sold but not taken away. Mr William George was for the plaintiff, and Mr E. R. Davies for the de- fendant. Plaintiff gave evidence as to the sale of the lambs. Defendant did. not clear the lambs, find plaintiff Rpoke to him about it. The defendant promised to take them away. The lambs were removed to Crucran. at the request of the defendant. Claimant I said that he could not wait longer for the < money. Defendant never until now de- 1 nied that he had purchased all the lambs (lGO). Cross-examined: He never said that the lambs would weigh a.t 9ibs. a quarter.—Mr Davies said that the agree- ment was to buy all that would suit de- fendant's purpose, for which he had paid. -Pl,,tintiff All the lambs had been dropped in May. It was agreed that sheep only I should graze on the land. Cattle had since grazed there. The defendant was to take off the lambs as he required them. A pound a head was not high. Defendant never complained that he could not get sufficiently good lambs that season, and that he would have to go elsewhere for some. He could not say how much &uch lambs should weigh. Defendant did not complain in August that the lambs were I not good.—Owen Miles, who was in the service of the defendant last summer, said that he heard the parties making a bargain about lambs. They a";1Jf"i m to the price. I The defendant wanted sixpence each dis- count. He told the witness subsequently that he had agreed to buy the lambs.— Cross-examined He never told the defend- ant that be knew nothing abo :t the bargain other than what Hugh Robers had told him. He never heard any complaints about the quality of the lambs. He had left the defendant on good terms. He did not look at Hugh Roberts in Court. He had him in his head! (loud laughter). De- fendant bought Jambs from others.—The defendant stated that the terms of purchase were that he was to pay El each for the Iambs on condition that they would weieh at least 91bs. per quarter. SOlllP of the lambs were very small indeed. Plaintiff agreed to sell what would suit him (de- fendant). Owen Miles told him that he had heard customers complaining about the lamb he had sold them last year. De- fendant complained to the plaintiff about the condition of the lambs, and he pro- mised to remove them to another field. He told the plaintiff in the hearing of the wit- nesses that he would not take any of the lambs in the condition they were in at the time, and Hugh Roberts said that some of them were very poor.—Robert Roberts, another butcher in the employ of the de- fandanlt, corroborated. The la-mlls. were not marketable.—The case was tried by a jury, who found for the plaintiff.

Wales In the Royal Arms.

[No title]

-rroposed Light Railway from…

Advertising

| FOOTBALL.

FOOTBALL NOTES.

Advertising

---Chancellorship of the Welsh…

FEDERATION. ; 1

Bangor Bankruptcy Court,

[No title]

Advertising