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Bangor Junior Reform Club. REJECTION, OF HOME RULE. The -del),oto on'the Home Rule Bill, in- troduced by the "opposition," was re- sumed on I'Viday evening by Mr Stephen Jones, the "hon. member" for Rosseudale, 1 who said that Ireland was'one- of the most distressed countries that anyone who studied history could point out. They had appealed to the "House," time after time, for redress, but in vain. They were not asking for any doles, but merely for justice to the Irish nation In 1800 a promise was made that Ireland should no longer be a stranger to the liberties which Englishmen enjoyed, and that the religion of the coun- try should be respected. It had been as- sorted that they were given the same pri- vileges as any other subject of the British Empire. That was not true. They had been repeatedly taunted with the allega- tion that Irishmen were traitors (cries of "Shame"). Were the brave Irishmen, fight- ing in South Africa, traitors; men who had shed their blood and had responded gal- lantly to the can of the Empire ? If they could do deeds of this kind in bondage, what could they do if given their freedom ? (loud "opposition" cheers). No country ever rose so rapidly in wealth, agriculture and general prosperity as Ireland in 1772 and 1780, in which year the rebellion broke out, and destroyed the prosperity of the country. Under the Act of Union Irishmen were promised that their religion should be respected, and they had knocked at the door of Parliament for the emancipation of Catholics 'in Ireland, but they were met with a; blank refusal. The "First Lord of the Admiralty" had spoken of massacres in Ireland. Had the Oatholics ever persecu- ted the Protestants ? On the contrary, Ire- land had been a haven, of rest for the Pro- testants. But what did they see in Bel- fast? In that place. there was no open door for the Catholics. Ireland had dso sent several prominent Protestants to »e- present it in Parliament. Sir Gavin Duff, I one of the brightest jewels of the country, was convicted as a tra.itor to his country, and was sentenced to be hanged, drawn, and quartered. Certain measures had been granted to Ireland, but, he was sorry to say, at a time when the sore had gone tco deep to remedy, when the disease had taken root, and when the patient was dying (hear, hear). In conclusion be hoped that His Majesty King Edward would attach his signature to one of the greatest measures ever brought forward, and which would give liberty to the down-trodden people of Ireland (loud "opposition" cheers). Mr J. Henry Jones ("East Manchester") did not complain of the length of the speeches of the promoters of the Bill, but he expected sound argument in its favour, and had been disappointed. He did not attribute that to the "hen. members'' themselves, but to the weakness of their cause ("ministerial" cheers). In bringing the Bill before the "House," the ''hon. members" were incurring a grave responsi- bility, and people who, no doubt, were suffering to some extent from pat wrorgs were encouraged by their leaders to dis- obey what they regarded as unjust laws (hear, hear). After severely criticising the action of "the member for Bradford," the "hon. gentleman" proceeded to say that no true friend of Ireland would have submit- ted such a Bill. The state of Ireland had been critical, but the Irish people were re- markable for their obedience to the law at ordinary times. However, they were an excitable people, and at times they broke out 'in violence and disorder (A voice: "The result of bad laws"). He submitted that it was because of the nature of the people. If Coercion Acts had been passed, it was the duty of every man. to obey those laws. Mr Grey Owen ("Monmouth"), in support- ing the Bill, commented upon the statement that the Irishmen were a rebellious people. He contended that an attempt by white slaves to be liberated could not fce termed rebellion. If Ireland was allowed Home Rule, instead of being a thon in the side of this country, it would be a white rose in its breast. What right had they to say that Irishmen rebelled against a Government whose rule they never accepted.. Mr 0. T. Owen said that during the dis- cussion re?,son had been conspicuous by :ts absence, and sentiment, had been very freely expounded. They should leave sen- timent for mothers' meetings (laughter). Was there, he asked, any grievances at pre- sent existing in Ireland which could not be settled by tho Imperial Government (cheers). At present, their brave soldiers were fighting m South Africa for a united Epieo, and the members opposite were bringing forward a measure to divide the Empire, ("ministerial" cheers). Mr Morgan, Independent College* ("Morthvr'') directed attention to the fact that £56,000 was paid, out of a rate col- lected from the Irish people, in support of an alien Chnrcn. In 1823 Irishmen suffered great hardships, in the attempt of the sold- iers to collect the tithe, the same hardship having also been suffered by Welsh farmers. He reminded them that £ 10,000 a. year was collected from the Irish people to carry on a college which was foreign to their reli- gious feelings, and the country had to maintain Trinity College, Dublin, thereby sustaining a cause which was agninst their spirit as a nation. The secretaryship of Ireland cost the Government something like £ 40,000 a year, whilst the Lord Lieutenant, who, in the name .of the Gov- ernment, ruled the country, was paid £ 7000 a year. Mr Cleaton Jones ("Orkney and Shet- Slands") stated that it was one of the sad- dest thingp that the, "House" had to meet this subject again. To have their feelings touched was one thing, but to have their reason converted was another (hear, hear). The "Government" had admitted that grievances did exist in Ireland, and they had, with the view to their reduction, passed special land measures, but it did not mean that they were going to give the country Home Rule simply because it fancied that it had grievances. Coercion Acts had been passed, and perhaps failed in their object. He favoured administrative independence for Ireland, but not legisla- tive independence. It was necessary for Ireland to be attached to this country be. cause the interest of both were mutual, and, if grq-nted, Ttuirto Rule, Ireland would pro- bably pass laws to suit their own purpose, the effect of which might be adverse to this country. The "leader of the opposition" (Mr Dud- ley Morgan), who was received with loud cheers) from 'the "opposition" benches, declared that persons crying that there was no reason in their opponents' speeches were covering a sad deficiency in their own ("opposition" cheers). He wished to dispute one point which the "hen. gen- tlemen" had made considerable capital of. Obedience to the law was virtue, and dis- obedience to the law was not a virtue, sa:id the gentlemen opposite. He would remind them of what Edmund Burke aid-tha.t there was a, limit when even forbearance ceased to be a virtue '(hear, hear). Dis- obedience to an unjust laTT war; sometimes a virtue. If a law was introduced under which Englishmen suffered a great injustice, the man that did not then revolt was not

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