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.--__-\ Bangor Junior Reform…

Crown Rights in Foreshores.j

Carnarvon Consty Council;

THE 20th CENTURY. |

Death ot Vice-Principalk John…

[No title]

THE CASE OF THE REV W. 0.…

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THE CASE OF THE REV W. 0.…

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:p.1m at the close ot the open trial (ap- plause) It had now been admitted that there wore no shocking charges against c!y him; and 'if there was no explanation of this extraordinary change of frcnt, then he said it was not conduct worthy of honour- able men, to say nothing of leaders in the Church of Christ. He had been asked why he vas agitating, and why he did not ap- peal to the- Quarterly Association. His reply was that the moment a responsible pledge was given that his demands would be granted he would do his best to stop the agitation (hear, hear). "'You are imperil- ling the integrity of the Connexion, he b.Cl been told. There might be some danger, but what were the facts ? Six months ago he was denounced as unfit to n.;x in decent society, and now it was said there was a danger of his stealing the allegiance of half the Connexion (laughter and applause). He asked for the evidence. Was that fair P (cries of "Yes"). He would say this much-it must be obtained (ap- plause). As long as he oculd use his tongue or his pen he would not cease his demand for it; and he believed he could convince the body of the Welsh people of one or two tlnIigs-namely, that either there was no evidence worth showing in the possession of the committee, or that it was not suffi- cient to uphold their verdict (applause). He absolutely declined to submit himself to another secret committee, and he trusted that secrecy in such cases would end for ever. He was asked why ho did not trust the Quarterly Association. That was one of his greatest sins, and the only unpardon- able one. He had had already a somewhat bitter experience, and having once burnt his fingers he did not intend to do so again (applause). But why should there be any question of confidence? This was a matter br the open daylight. The committee must be open for the sake of the committee it- self and he believed that no man who had any regard for his reputation would dare to sit on this matter in secret again (loud applause). He had been charged with shirking an inquiry. He had tried to bring the matter into a civil court he had asked the Monthly Meeting to make the evidence public, and he was asking for an open in- quiry. All these things had been refused, and it was said that he was shirking the matter. It wa& ".aid that he would never appeal because the case against him was too black. He had asked his friend, Mr G. C. Rees, to draw up the! notice of appeal, and as soon as that was ready it would be for- warded (applause). Tliere was a great de- to stop the agitation the whole energy | of Liverpool officialism had been directe d to- wards quelling the storm. Some of the Liverpool ministers had, since his dismissal, been using every opportunity both in that city and on their journeys in Wales to blacken his character by retailing the ugliest tales about him, which they knew, or ought to know, were naked untruths .(ap- plause). His supporters were, even threat- ened with Church discipline (loud-laughter). There was fear of an explosion, and the method adopted to prevent it was to sit on the safety valve (hear, hear). As illustrat- ing the methods adopted to silenco him, he read a letter, dated Liverpool, February 8th, and signed "Torn Jones," which he had received on the previotis night. The writer stated that he had been one of Mr Jones's supporters "throughout this awful ordeal." He had been told by an Englishman of high standing in the town that he and three others had seen Mr Junes "reeling drunk on that voyage," and that gentleman had promised not to communicate with the Presbytery on condition .that Mr Jones would not go to the Carnarvon or any ether meeting. "Now, my dear sir," added the writer, "don't go to Carnarvon; get 1'i or .scmeth"ig. Mind you, this letter is no hoax or dodge, but is as true as God is in heaven." He (Mr Jones) challenged that gentleman, if be exited, to come forward and, more than that, he challenged nny man to eoin&i forward in his presence and siv that he had seen him drunk or under the influence of drink (loud applause). Mr G. C. Rees (Mr Jones's solicitor) liexi- sroke. He said Mr Jones war. prepared to appeal, but he laid down four conditions which they would all agree were emine-ntly fair. These were (1) a copy of the evidence advanced against him before the committee in the first instance (2) that a shorthand rote-taker .should bo present to take down the whole of the evidence; (3) that Mr Jenes should he accompanied by two tr three friends; and finally that nothing should be said affecting the case to the judges or committee except in Mr Jones's presence1. Sir Jones and his committee were prepared to give pledges that no legal proceedings should be taken against any witness who might give evidence, however slanderous, against Mr Jones at this new irvestigation. He undertook to say that the appeal on these conditions would be in the hands of the Connexional authori- ties by Thursday next (applause). He asked that meeting to support the appeal by taking care that when the matter came before the Quarterly Association these reasonable demands were conceded. The Chairman at this stage offered an opportunity for an amendment to be moved, and, none being forthcoming, he put the resolution, which was unanimously carried amid much cheering. Mr E. R. Davies (Pwllheli) afterwards de- livered a forcible speech, in the course of which he said that the great question was whether their Connexion was to be priestly or democratic in its character (applause). Mr R. O. Williams (Liverpool) also re- ferred to the priestly spirit that was creep- ing into the Connexion. The proceedings terminated with a vote of thanks to the chairman, proposed by Mr I'eter Williams (Waenfawr), and seconded by Mr W. 0. Williams. As the meeting was breaking up a great number of people pressed on to the platform to shake hands with Mr Jones, and to heartily wish, him si.cci-ss in his strugglp for a fair trial. We unidprstand that the movement in favcur of Mr Jones is rapidly spreading throughout the whole of North Wales. A public meeting is to be organised almost immediately at Blaenau Festiniog, and it is likely tha. Wrexham, Llangefni, Corwen, and other centres will be selected for simi- iar demonstrations.

.--__-\ Bangor Junior Reform…