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.--__-\ Bangor Junior Reform…

Crown Rights in Foreshores.j

Carnarvon Consty Council;

THE 20th CENTURY. |

Death ot Vice-Principalk John…

[No title]

THE CASE OF THE REV W. 0.…

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THE CASE OF THE REV W. 0. JONES, B.A. MASS MEETIG AT CARNABVON. On Saturday a mass meeting was held at Carnarvon in support of the agitation for a re-hearing of the case against the Rev. W. O. Jones, late of Chatham street. Liver- pool. In the afternoon a conference was held to discuss ways and means, and after a, long discussion it was resolved that the committee which had summoned the meet- ing, with pewer to add to its number, should remain in charge of the movement and make all necessary arrangements to press for a. re-hearing of the whole case under conditions which the committee should deem to be fair. At the close of the conference a public meeting was held at the Pavilion. By the time the proceedings commenced the build- ing was mofj than three-fourths full. When the Rev. W O. Jones, accompanied by his solicitor, Mr Griffith Caradoc Rees, appeared on the pla.tf-.rm, ho was heartily cheered. The chair was taken hy Mr G. J. Hughes, county councilor, Llanberis. He said that many asked vhat this gathering portended, and what the object of the whole agitation was. It had. been said that their object was to attack the ministers of the Connex- ion, to create discord in. churches, to des- troy connexion, to produce a loose, inver- tebrate profession of religion, and to make the, guilty appear innocent. He denied ail these allegations. That meeting might he- lieve Mr W. O. Jones to be innocent—(ap- plause)—but they had no right to say that he was; for they had no evidence to prove him eithrr guilty or innocent. All the meeting demanded was to. bring to the light of day what had hitherto been kept carefully hidden in this matter. What en- dangered the unity of the Connexion was not the action of those who demanded jus- tice, but rather the action of committees who insisted on keeping in the dark things ihat should be brought to the light of day. Si uch as he respected the ministers of the Connexion, he admiffed he could not un- derstand their action in this matter. The best preachers were not always the best committeemen, or the men possessed of the most- judicial minds (applause). Mr G. Williams, Waeufawr, a member of Mr Jones's eld church, moved the following resolution —"That this meeting, consisi- ing for a great part of Walsh Calvinistic Methodists, protests again&t the Liverpool Monthly Meeting in refusing to grant the Rev. W. Ü, Jones a copy of the evidence against him; that we erdorse the two re- quests made by Mr Jones, viz. (1) to be supplied with a written cupv of all the charges and evidence against him, and (2) for an open trial sucji as he has described. That we are strongly of opinion th '.t HO- thing less than the granting of quests can new serve to satisfy the public and Calvinistic churches, and that we pic-age ourselves to do all in our power to assist in securing for Mr Jones what he now seoiss." The mover of the resolution said he had known Mr Jonts for twenty-two )f;a.S" and could from personal experience testify to the beneficia1 influence exerc-i;ed by lis friendship and teaching. He had found him at all times a faithful friend, a tlorcugh gentleman, and a worthy minister of the Gospel (applause). Mr W. W. Jones (Cyrus), Llanllyfni, ex- president- of the North Wales Quarrymen'' Umor, seconded. He failed to see any- thing in the rules of the Connexion to pre- vent the Association granting Mr Jones what he asked for (applause). It was diffi- cult at present to say who wero the prose- cuto-s and who the judges in the case (laughter). Had the church at Chatham stret, through its diaconate, prosecuted Mi Jonas they could understand the situation, but they had not done so. If the com- mi'.tee of investigation had sought evidence thoy were evidently disqualified to act a judges (applause). They should have placed the evidence they had collected before an- other committee, who would sift and weign ti e evidence thus collected, but the same persons should not act both as prosecutors a id judges (applause). If Mr W. 0. Jones were guilty, let the truth be made known, and let the Monthly Meeting's verdict be justified; but let them have none of these h«*cret> proceedings. Let them do away with every vestige of Popish customs in their de- nomiaation (applause). He regretted to say it, but it was his duty to say it, that a rift was being made between the pulpit and the people, between the ministry and the masses (cries of "Quite true," and ap- plause). It was alleged, and with truth, thai. a distinction was being made between the rich and the poor by the ministry, and the result was that the churches were in danger of being emptied (applause). Mr R. O. Glyn Roberts, a member of the church at Chatham street, said the matter wuuld nerer have been heard of had there not oeen some disagreement in Chatham street. The deacons there had forgotten they were only the servants of the church, and tried to posei as its masters. He be- lieycd that given the opportunity, Mr Jones votiid prove his innocence. He adsiircu the; pulpit oratory of the ministers wliu composed the investigation committee, but r.3 had no respect for their judicial capa- nty. The committee was appointed as a ;emmittee of investigation only; they then became prosecutors; and now postd as judges. The Rev. W. O. Jones, who was receivee: with great enthusiasm, next addressed, the meeting, and expressed his heartfelt grati- tude for the attendance of so great a multi- tude of his friends. The Liverpool Montn- ly Meeting had declared him guilty of offences too shocking to be mentioned and if they had believed that that verdict was a just one, instead of assembling there in their thousands they might have been aToiding him as they would a leper. It had been said that only the dregs of so- ciety attended these meetings—(laughter) but he must say that he was not ashamed of his company (a. Voice: "And we are not ashamed of you, either, and applause). That great concourse, brought together from distant places, showed to him that his fellow-countrymen had not al- together despaired of him—(hear, hear)— and that they were not entirely convinced that the Liverpool Monthly Meeting were infallible (applause). The great body of the public did not know whether he was guilty or innopeiit; but some of his closest friends believed) he was innocent, and there was one, and that was himself, who knew that he waja innocent (loud applause). He be- lieved that the motto of that great meeting was "Fairplay." He desired nothing more. He only asked for the evidence and for an open trial; and he was not afraid that any fair-minded man would say that he was ask- ing for what was unreasonable (applause). He wanted all secrecy to be. dissipated, and he trusted that that meeting would send lorth a. clear, unanimous voice that would be ringing in the ears of the Liverpool Monthly Meeting for weeks to come (loud applause). It would serve no useful pur- pose to reiterate the facts of the case, bui he was prepared to stand by everything he had stated. He was accused cf having madei misstatements. He did not ask them to believe his word as against that of the Monthly Meeting; all he asked them was to k-ee a record of the case, and to read it ■

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THE CASE OF THE REV W. 0.…

.--__-\ Bangor Junior Reform…