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EBWARIj Y11: falS C A [' •…

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-= -=-- [All EBYBD.) EBWARIj Y11: falS C A [' c» u" AS PH1NCE or WALE! BY CHAKLES LOWE, MA. 01 -A Life of the Czar" "Prince JSitwairlt A &°graphyf" «< William II."$c.J II. WEST AND EAST. ^tocimlo111- ^na^a>" wrote the Prince Consort to ble aegf. August, I860, "we have the best possi- is generally pronounced the ^ertip'^C^°n of nat,ire." But what had taken ist he hoj i ^anada ? In the character of a tour- but it already seen a great part of the Old World, gent trav^i*101^ ^an^e mere curiosity of an intelli- Kew one prompted his departure for the year hp i. j ^a°t is, that now, in his nineteenth v- ^>een trusted with the first of those be rightl have enabled the Prince of Wales to part of re&arded ae a very useful and important that is to machinery °f the British State—missions, pergonal • ^7'. while ostensibly private and lated to j a*m> were the same time calcu- eults. ^r0 ce great political impressions and re- Th « continue t* ^ew South Wales, in 1885, to send our her loyal sons to help us in fighting i hattl«s was by no means the first in* •^Urino. devotion to old Mother England, theij L i f"nean war the Canadians had also, of for 0ur n tree will and ofter, fitted out a regiment *avour +vervJcc ^le East, and in return wr this theij- TV, that the Queen would visit to e--°n. It had been found as inexpedient ^(Jrtiand reQueK^ as with the alternative 8°Dfr—still Maiesty should appoint one of her Canada • T> .'n .^eir teens—Governor-Ueneral of that wh iv" *n ^eu thcrof the Queen had promised <sh°i^d j. ^r^nce of Wales was old enough, he the time v ;!ir*e<^ 011 a to the Dominion, and trioet now come for the fulfilment of this gratifying pledge. IN CANADA. *#ta*Tof 5?^ °f the Duke of Newcastle, Sec- priatesuif V?r.^e Colonies, and with an appro- '4 Hero ^nce embarked on board the frigate —and affcp^ Was ef;corted by the Ariadne .,a veJ7 boisterous voyage reached ceived wi+u on the 25th JulJ'' 1860- IIe was re- thusjag a tremendous outburst of popular en- t, ^eaTN were even shed by the rough Hiade thp"' aiu^ hirsute as the dogs which have ^Ppearati^ c.ioUT1^ry famous all over the world. "His Archdeaf06 18.vei7 much in his favour," wrote the f°yal, dio-John's while his youth, and touched all tf Iuarmcr an(l bearing, seemed to have v°man -»>. hearts, f°r there is scarcely a man or Kewfour^fi0 sPeak of ililQ without tears." The bore *8ucj» ers ^vore delighted to find that the Prince resemblance to the portraits of his thermore e\011 British coins, and they were fur- ttian BUDnn^f- with the spectacle of so young a tiong a^5°m £ ^th such evident ease all the recep- to figure—-vf^n8' ^anfluetfi> and balls at which he had Mth th» which he danced indiscriminately <hiut>htf.~ ladies, and with the wives and The p ■ t,he beart'-v fisherfolk. ^QlIiphallllCe 8 ^.our through Canada was one long its cliitia- ^r?cessi9n'niK^ popular enthusiasm reached iie laid tV, i 'ea' *n ntime his royal mother, bridifn nv 6 8^onc the great Victoria Railway n ge OVer the St. Lawrence at Montreal. At King- him °ronto the Orangemen had tried to get Political ,'ln^er the arches adorned with their frineg ^^bols and mottoes, but here again the could notV n he distinctly understood that he *>5o-i/Uow name t° he associated with party ^th rem ? Policy to which he has ever adhered dent reIllarkable tenacitv and tact. No serious inci- to mar the complete success of the of P^ffreKS, und the only thing in the nature Vaa Yp>, mi^ht be called a pleasant little contrttemp* fell wit}fvat a ^lK'hec> H.R.H. tripped and dent he partner—the article recording the acci- In beaded-Ronigoit qui tnal y peine He the J? iiIa^a^tt un^er the most picturesque condi tions, ^Kht* i heing illuminated at night by Bengal they between them and the rock over which tUago 1^rr?hle, making them look alternately like a tiver J ^ncan<^escent silver and a seething lurid this w hlood. He has repeatedly declared that day, one of the finest sights he ever saw. Next ape^j,. e presence of the Prince and thousands of *cr0ss Bhmdin, the tight-rope artist, walked but wh 6 v °n Btilte with a man on his Ws fiaine the famous funambulist offered to do the "With n ^or the Prince, the latter shook his head a 8mile> AatEEICAIf EECErnON 0? THE PBINCB. •lb Cansi^1111^^ bas had been the Prince's progress awaited)/' was nothing to the reception which and ni i11 America whence he now repaired tour wi.-af Perhaps this aspect of his Transatlantic •Joined f^T -Wa8 most significant. To be wel- -^omini18^6^ the subjects of his mother in the •ceJai^^J only natural but to be frantically had eni • the United States who *lisrule ailc'Pated themselves from the rule, or th« that not ^^t grandfather, George III-—was that bloJii (?crnvincing proof, if ever there was o*e, federa^^ 18 thicker than water, and that there is a the /?n, a solidarity between all the members of ^ties J1366 stronger than could be effected by ^Funse'i*8- conventions ? On first hearing of the visit to Canada, President Buchan- I to Queen offering him a cordial tend hiB ■ afihington should he be pleased te ex- invitat;^1^ the United States, while a similar Wh ca«^, tu016 ^rom the City of New York. In tion t}^68 replies were affirmative, with the adcll- 8°^ tj. V the moment of his quitting British and gin. would drop his royal title and state, as a p Pv travel as Baron Renfrew, so as to be able, gentleman, to employ the small amount I of the at his disposal in studying the ordinary life progj. J^erican people, in whose extraordinary Canadf8' 8,8 the Prince himself said before leaving t&regt' >' every Englishman feels a common in- thia. jU16 ^nwieans themselves would have none of "Baron »r*e °* their popular writers remarked, a mere *°t»o nfrew" would notdofor them. They were Rr? he Bhabbed off by any other title than ^P-and./ Highness the Prince of AY ales,' a real I too out-and-out Prince, of the right ^•reiy i .pr there is not a living being more sin- 4c. Tho k^ OUr P60?^ than his royal mother," Present!VU Prince s visit was a private one, it S^portinn*8801116^ a Puhlic character of the hugest Loni v Chicago, Cincinnati, Detroit, and Rliinpg..the crowds which pressed to oatch a g-gt were 80 va*t that he sometimes could that the • • while one individual remarked Sweater if^^ty to see hira oould not have been ^shino-t distinguished visitor had been George 4 PopUli^v COme to ^fe n £ ain-" He is decidedly ^bove character with us," said the other writer Ud ^u°ted, and may consider himself a lucky he reacV esf^Pes a nomination for President before Half •8. homeward-bound fleet. ri>al in vmillion 8Pectators acclaimed him on his ar- ■May°r *~y Yot-k, where he was the guest of the to fciggt 3,000 of the leadintr people were invited that7hpfl Rt a ball where the crush was so great ^onr CBi ?°r ^ave way. But the significance of his ^a« a at Washington where the Prince a visit f ?l the President, who accompanied him Ion. rp, the tomb of Washington at Mount Ver- ♦ WM Komething," wrote the Times V Blandly suggestive of historical J^aleg m the reverential awe of the Prince of eaded at tv. ^rttn^son °f George III, standing bare- 4 i»iom e_'°°t of the coffin of Washington. For ^d tho the party stood mute and motionless, side of °f, en proceeded to plant a chestnut by ?°Uth clo«u»^ f, tomb. It seemed when the royal ^as bum" v ear^ around the little germ, that and ouri faint trace of discord between • vet lretl in the West." ^Snificant ^'thin little more than a year of thi* ^*°hanije e ^hich waR followed by a warm Buch0^>m^'inientary letters between Presi- United «+ ar the Queen, Great Britain and K there ia n*4i ,Were ou the very verge of war. a.je gone to e "ouht, moreover, that they would ■S2Iiiewhn+ ^or the fact that our emphatic pl-^aehintH-!>Unator}r despatch to the Government vr j,; t Y 88 to the federal boarding of the £ >. saden?Trv, ••»«! ih.- iof ner!vroPe. was tm ,r**on\ Vue C<rt»f.?dcra^e L'r^s hp. y the PrL 1 in such » judicious mm- j Hir> \v ,°.rlS0rt te respect the sei^tive- en bridya ,,p ^h^ghin Guvernment. build it a kteZ ^hem't^ A6 ail<^ cunsc, it to "cheer- tjf., his trYf.f.1 "e ^or.rhrrn yw^engerr.. eaded at tv. ^rttn^son °f George III, standing bare- 4 i»iom e_'°°t of the coffin of Washington. For ^d tho the party stood mute and motionless, side of °f, en proceeded to plant a chestnut by ?°Uth clo«u»^ f, tomb. It seemed when the royal ^as bum" v ear^ around the little germ, that and ouri faint trace of discord between • vet lretl in the West." ^Snificant ^'thin little more than a year of thi* ^*°hanije e ^hich waR followed by a warm Buch0^>m^'inientary letters between Presi- United «+ ar the Queen, Great Britain and K there ia n*4i ,Were ou the very verge of war. a.je gone to e "ouht, moreover, that they would ■S2Iiiewhn+ ^or the fact that our emphatic pl-^aehintH-!>Unator}r despatch to the Government vr j,; t Y 88 to the federal boarding of the £ >. saden?Trv, ••»«! ih.- iof ner!vroPe. was tm ,r**on\ Vue C<rt»f.?dcra^e L'r^s hp. y the PrL 1 in such » judicious mm- j Hir> \v ,°.rlS0rt te respect the sei^tive- en bridya ,,p ^h^ghin Guvernment. build it a kteZ ^hem't^ A6 ail<^ cunsc, it to "cheer- tjf., his trYf.f.1 "e ^or.rhrrn yw^engerr.. bar and *? f*T^C0 to the country of his a2op- ton|v^ hife >!{, liU httlc more than a vear after u1 io historical reve2<'i,Cf befoi-e tbr the Prince of Wait, w*- 4'J; fhtijyj. "s 'j ►rnef at the open grave of i uiifsw had been aggravated Jfi eldest sun t which Tiad now Dcen rfclutilea a? I Cambridge, varied by vacation exercise with the 1st I Grenadier Guards at the Curragh. It said much for his filial piety and tenderness of heart that all pres- ent at the funcnil of Albert the Good were deeply I inored by tho in con sola bie s>.rrcw of his sons. The Pr!v of Wales, of course, was the chief mourner in St. G«orge't Uhapel, Windsor, two days before Christinas in the year 1861. At> he stcou nt the grave-side," wrote an t-ye-witepse. looking down with hands clasped, ail his fortitude deserted him, 84)4 he burst into a flood of tears, covering up hie face," until he was led away by the Lord Chamber- lain. Of THE EAST, Shortly before the Prince Consort had fallen ill, he had written to his friend Stockmar that, after the Prince of Wales's time was up at Cambridge, which it would be at Christmas, it was his desire to travel, "and we have gladly assented to his proposal to visit the Holy Land." The word propowd "is interesting as showing that the initiative to this tour in the East came from the youthful Prince him- Belf, who was now twenty and he had now an ad- ditional reason for carrying out his seheme of travel, seeing that his mind and heart required distraction from the filial sorrow to which they h' become a prey. Accordingly, in the early spring In 1862, the Prince, accompanied by General Bruce, Major Tees- dale, Captain Keppel, and a small suite started for Alexandria where he was joined by Dr. (afterwards Dean) Stanley, who had already been to Jerusalem, and was to act as archaeological guide and lecturer to his Royal Highness. The Prince," wrote General Bruce, takes great delight in the new world on which he has entered, and Dr. Stanley is a great acquisition." On the other hand, Dr. Stanley wrote, it is im- possible not to like him, and to be constantly with I him brings out his astonishing memory of names and persons. I am more and more struck by the amiable and endearing qualities of the Prince. H.R.H. has laid himself down a rule that there was to be no shooting to-day (Sunday), and though he was sorely tempted, as we passed flocks of cranes and geese seated on the bank in the most inviting crowds, he rigidly conformed to it a crocodile was allowed to be a legitimate exception, but none appeared. He sat alone on the deck with me, talking in the frankest manner for an hour in the afternoon, and made the most reasonable and proper remarks on the due ob- servance of Sunday in England." This was on the Prince's progress up the Nile to Cairo, where he was received with royal state by the Viceroy, Nubar Pasha, after which he proceeded to Thebes, Memphis, Karnak, and the Pyramids-the greatest of which he ascended—much to the amaze- ment of the Bedouins, who asked sceptically," Is that the Governor ? If so, why does he go alone P" The royal party went up the Nile as far as the first cataract viewing the temple at Esneh by torchlight, and exr ling all the antiquities at Assouan, and wit- nessing a tournament between some Arnauts and Arab et- it Is. At the end of March the travellers reached Pales- tine and proceeded to Jerusalem, this being the first time that the Holy City had been visited by the heir to the English throne since the days of Edward I. and Richard Lion-Heart, in whose footsteps the Prince of Wales, escorted by a picturesque troop of Turkish Cavalry,' now advanced to view the scenes which had been consecrated by the presence and the sufferings of the Saviour of men. H.R.H., who had pitched his tent on the northern side of the city near the Damascus Gate, was deegly interested and moved by all he saw and all he heard from the lips of Dr. Stanley and with him for a companion he visited all the sacred places, even those which had re- mained closed to Christians for several hundred years: the Mosque of Hebron, for example, of which the Turkish Guardian said that for no one, but the eldest son of the Queen of England, would he have allowed the gate to be opened indeed the Princes of any other nation would have had to pass over his body before doing so. With that thoughtful con- sideration for others which has ever distinguished him, the Prince had stipulated that his learned com- panion should have the same privilege as himself and on thanking H.R.H. for having procured him this great opportunity, the latter replied, High station, you see, sir, has after all some merits, some advantages." Yes, sir," replied the Doctor, and I hope you will always make a good use of it." The royal party returned home by way of Damas- cus, Beyrout, Tyre and Sidon, Tripoli, Pataioe, Eph^sus, Smyrna, Constantinople, Athens, and Malta, and the torn; ended at Marseilles, whence the Prinee paid a visit to the French Emperor at Fon- tainebleau, and then repaired to Windsor to give his royal mother an account of his travels. The Prince had returned home greatly improved both in body and mind, and lie was now on the threshold of a vigorous and promising manhood. By this time the White Lodge in Richmond had been exchanged as his residence for Marlborough House in Pall Mall while out of the revenues of the Duchy of Cornwall, which his father had so carefully hus- banded for him during his minority, he had, for the sum of X220,000, purchased the fine estate of Sand- ringham in Norfolk. But what was the use of these two splendid palaces—one a town, the other a coun- try houee-without a wife to share his felicity in then f

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