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. LIBERAL MEETING AT CAR'…

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. LIBERAL MEETING AT CAR'…

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ANNEXATION, • and he earnestly asked those who disagreed J with him to pause and reflect before they < sanctioned the country's embarking upon a war of annexation (cheers). The Boers were a stubborn race, who fought Spain for a hundred years, and who so exhausted the power of that country that it had de- clined. ever since. The ancestors of the Boers were fighting then for a religious I issue, but race was even deeper than re- ligion, as the case of Ireland proved. We were embarking on a war of an- nexation which might become a.1 war of extermination: Where was this war, which was costing between six and eight millions a month, going to end ? We could not exterminate the Boers, and when Pretoria, had been captured it would take 50,000 troops to occupy the two Re- publics. Talking about insults to soldiers led him to say that the Government were paying the Colonial troops, whose battles we were fighting, 5s a day, while our own soldiers received Is 2d a day, the Welsh 1 Fusiliers included, who made that magni- ficent fight (cheers). He could not but 1 feel proud' as a Welshman that the Welsh 1 national regiments were the only ones > not represented now in Pretoria (cheers), j They had not been caught; they were I smarter than the Boers even (hear, hear). I When Mr Bryn Roberts and himself raised in the House of Commons, the question of the disparity in the payment made to the soldiers in South Africa, the very men who said that they had were insulting the sol- diers were those who put them down (hear, hear). It was said that the war would be I over when we had conquered the Boers. Such was not likely to be the case. No I race worth its salt would accept defeat as long as they could fight (hear, hear). There « was Ireland for instance. Seven hundred 1 years had gone by since they conquered Ireland; and they had not conquered it yet (laughter and hear, hear). The reason why was because the Irish were a proud, people, a people with deep national convictions. We would never conquer a race like that except by winning their affections (cheers). Mr Gladstone discovered that; and by the way there was nothing more amusing than the way Tory speakersi talked about Mr Gladstone., The deceased statesman was now patronisingly alluded to by men who were not fit to blacken his boots—men like the professor, who did not know the ele- ments of history, and Mr Gray. These men said that Mr Gladstone knew nothing. Lord Salisbury, on the other hand, spoke of the late statesman as the greatest intellect ever placed at the service of the State. When Mr Gladstone made that