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. LIBERAL MEETING AT CAR'…

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WELSH HOSPITAL FUND, and a jolly mess he had made of that fund, but that professor had never told them I that he had asked him (Mr George) to collect for the fund and that he had done so and collected over one hundred pounds (loud cheers). The professor had not told them that the first subscription he (Mr George) had obtained for that fund was one of JE25 from Sir William Harcourt, who was opposed! to the war (loud cheers), and yet that man, who was perfectly aware of those facts, said that he (Mr George) had been insulting the Welsh soldiers, and he allowed other men as mean as himself to do the same thing when he knew that the response to this appeal from him was in his .(the speaker's) case a hundred times more effective than the response of those who cheered him when he made these charges. Another gen- tleman at the Tory meeting was a lawyer who gave the member for the Carnarvon Boroughs notice to quit (laughter). But this was not the first official of the Pen- rhyn estate who had given, notice to quit to Liberals-(cheers)-for sticking to their opinions. At Bethesda a week ago he spoke about the men who led that magni- ficent struggle for tibe rights of workmen, a struggle that thriiledl the heart of Bri- tain fromi end to end. He asked what became of the leaders of that combination -men of ability, character, and strength -who stood not for themselves but for their fellow-workmen? They had notice to quit from the Penrhyn estate ("Shame"). It. was meet and proper that one of the creatures of an estate which had given notice to quit to workmen for standing for the right of free combination to give notice to a member of Parliament for standing for the right of free speech (cheers). But there was g. material dis- tinction at the present moment. The Penrhyn quarry was the property of the Penrhyn estate, but the convictions of the electors of Carnarvon boroughs were their own rreehold. The Penrhvn writ did not run in the consciences of Carnarvon- shire people whatever it might do on the estate (loud cheers). But really what were the Tories coming to? In the last three elections JIe had met men whom Ale was proud to fight-his friends Sir John Pules- ton and Sir Hugh Ellis Nanney, one of ths most respected squires in Carnarvon- shire. What, he asked again were the Tories coming to now? (cheers). Refer- ring again to the charge that he had in- sulted British soldiers, he said that it was an absolute and unmitigated FALSEHOOD. He had never spoken of the British sol- diers without expressing admiration of their bravery, tenacity, and heroism. He asked upon what ground was the charge made against him? .-He would tell them what be did say, and it was the only ground upon which the charge was made. He said that the cheap patriots who went about howling, breaking up meetings, and smashing windows, instead of fighting themselves paid men to fight thte battles for them (cheers). These gentlemen were exceedingly tender about the soldiers, but they did not-mind sending them to be killed and to die of lingering illness or wounds (cheers). All this was cant and hypocrisy. Those who loved the soldiers were the men who thought their lives too precious to be squandered upon a miser- able squabble like this (applause). We had gone now beyond our first demands, and he earnestly appealed to them to reflect and consider before they embarked on a war of annexation. At first it was said that the war was to be for the rights of white men but there came the cry, "We want money: we want gold." To this Lord Salisbury replied, "We seek no goldfields and territory," but, the "Daily Mail" next day asked, "If we do not seek goldfields and territory, what do we seek ?" (laughter and hear, hear). At this stage Mr Herbert Lewis M.P., appeared on the platform, and was accor- ded an enthusiastic reception. proceeding,' Mr Lloyd George said he ventured to prophesy that the war would not end in two or three months, as had been said. Had Mr Bryn Roberts told them when he addressed a meeting in that hall some Anontbs ago that the Bri- tish army would only be in Bloemfontein now they would, have cried nonsense. They had now arrived/at the second stage of the war; and he would address himself to those who believed the war vwas a ]ust one, and he would rather, if they sup- ported the war, that they should believe in its justice, because it was subversive of every moral principle to support a war which was not believed to be just (cheers). We were in possession of one of the Boer capitals, so that the two Republics con- sidered they had been • sufficiently beaten to concede what we went to war for— equal rights for white men,—but now we were going in for

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. LIBERAL MEETING AT CAR'…