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I A BABY TAKEN AWAY. I

PATENTS GRANTED AND SPECIFICATIONS-GRANTED.

MERITORIOUS CONDUCT OF A CRIC-,…

PRESENTATION TO THE BISHOP…

THE LATE SIR G. 0. MORGAN.…

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BROKE IN TWO IX THE MIDDLE.

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BROKE IN TWO IX THE MIDDLE. I, the writer, was riding in a railway coach one day in the autumn of 1886. The train was speeding swiftly and smoothly on its journey. Suddenly three of the car- riages left the metals', mine being one of them. We all rolled down a lov." embank- ment together. Nobody was killed, but ment together. Nobody was killed, but several were more or less seriously hurt. On my left leg there is a long and broad scar that. I shall carry to my grave—the result of a wound received on that occasion. The cause of the accident was this: The tront axle of the first of the three coaoiies broke squarely in two in the middle—an absolute ely new piece of iron, the coach being then 10 nits fourth trip. Nothing remarkable about t2.t: do you say ? There is a lesson in ll, my friend a lesson in it, which even a well-informed fellow like you can afford to make a note of. I'll tell you what it is in a minjto. Perhaps you can guess it right off the reel. Anyhow, you will be willing to read Mr. Marsden' s evidence as to a sirailu :nis- hap. hap. "In the autumn of 1892," he says, 1 that something was wrong witn mc.i felt I drowsy, heavy, and tired,—will -li was a new thing in my experience. The whites of my eyes turned yellow and my skin was dark f and sallow. There was a nasty, copperish taste in my mouth, particularly in the morning, and I spat ip a great deal of phlegm—thick, slimy stuff it was. I had no proper relish for my meals, and often enough I could not even taste of any of my favourite dishes. "This was bad, but worse was coming. One day in the early part of January (1893), whilst at dinner a dreadful pain took me in the right side. For some minutes I couldn't move on account of it. I was in agony. The sharpness of the attack abated pre- sently, but it left its mark on me. After that I had diffic-ulty in getting about, and and although I struggled on with my work it was a great punishment to me, as I was in constant pain. In fact, it was a trouble to get in and out of bed. As time went on the pain in my side in- rceased. Every breath I drew pained me and I had to sit doubled up I couldn't straighten myself out. For nearly a year I was in this condition, and for months I was under medical treatment. The doctor said there was a stoppage in the bowels, but his medicine did nothing to ease me. In August (1893) I heard from Mr B. Bell, the Grocer, Brompton, of the good Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup had done in a case something like mine. I sent for it and began taking it and in the short space of fourteen days I found great relief. This encouraged me to keep on with the Syrnp, and I did so. The result was that the pain left me by degrees until it was all gone, and I had no feeling of illness at all. I am now well and strong as ever I was. I am perfectly willing you should publish what I have said if you think it is worth the trouble and expense. Yours truly ,(Signed) Thomas Marsden, 2, Hodgson terrace, Brompton, North Allerton, October 26th, 1893." We do decidedly think it worth the trouble and expense, and we'll tell you why. Hark back to what was said about the rail- way accident. Very well. Now when they came to examine that new axle they found a bad flaw right in the centre of it—not | visible on the outside. It was fatally de- j fective from the day it was made, vet no- j body could know it. When it broke it suddenly and without warning—of course. t It was God's mercy a dozen people were not killed by it. « Well, our friend Mr Marsden had always ( been a healthy man—so he thought. He ¡ rboke down suddenly. Why ? Because of the deadly poisons in his blood engendered I by latent and slow acting indigestion and dyspepsia. Slowly but surely the poison I spread until it reached the vital spots. Then be fell as the railway coach did—from a hidden flaw. Happily for him Mother Seigel's Syrup was able to cure (to repair) ¡ him. I What, then, is that lesson we promised you? It is this. Watch out for the early signs of weakness and take the remedy then Don't wait until you are down the bank. As for the coach axles we shall have to trust to luck.

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-,.PERSONA^ AND GENERAL.I

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UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NORTH…

YACHT CrXBS AND ARMORIAL

FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE PENRHYN…

THE ANGLESEY NEEDLEWORK GUILD.

THEFT OF ^!^E^A¥"X £ 1NDUDN0.

THE SALE OF I^NK^TxTCHILDREN.