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{NOW FIRST FTTBLJSHED.] REVENGE IS SWEET, BY ALLISON HUGHES. [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] The sun was shining brightly oil a odd February morning, and the sparrows chirped ae merrily amid the smoke-blackened boughs of the Charterhouse Square trees as though summer foliage surrounded their mirth. Evidently those two ancient brethren of the Hos- pital were not beguiled into any such noneenscal mistake, however, for they sauntered along shiver- ing and coughing dismally in the intervals of ooo- varsAticm. A shocking occurrence!" said one. Shocking indeed! but such events are taking pisu>» daily." Yes, but they are not all young and beautiful. Ah what a piercing wind." The bradiren's remarks concerned a. tragedy which had recently taken place- in the great city, a. tragedy so eorrowful that few who had conned bver its ric,us details from the pages of the Times had tun-'id away without some slight tightening of the fe»wrtstrings, or moisture of the eyes. Home few months before the February morning in question, a lady had taken up her residence a.t a boarding-house in the Square. Of good birth, ■judging from her refined manners, and possessed apparently of ample means, how came it then tiutt A* wadlen-tirely without correspondents, and totality neglected as regards friendly callers? i "e opinion of the dignified proprietress of tie ests 'iislimeat was buried in her own breast; but til* unanimous verdict of those keen-sighted beings, v-i. » watch so kindly over the lives of "their bet- ita.?,' as the saying goes, was tha.t No. 8 was a. divorced wife! 1 ilt, judgments of the area are arrived at by a. war, not to add mysterious process, and, must uconfess the fact, only too frequently hit the m,vic. Or* morning, there was considerable ku' 3wing amongst the ladies of the kitchen, who Lad '¡een thrown into a terrible flutter of excitement over the fact that Miss Turner had at last received a Iriter, with considerable emphasis on the word LaA. Where was the letter from?" asked cook, closing her own door with a terrible clang. Varry to be sure, where they all come from, to puch is her!' was the dignified reply of Jamès, the tfer^ral factotum of the establishment, and it may be a<<xled the frequent interpreter of such profound probiums as battled his fellow-searchers in the paths of di.*»very. You ohould just have seen her when she caugn* eiirht A the liandwriting. Well, I never! Talk of corses, and ghostises James made a sudden exit, for the bell was ringing last j,\d furiously. A hanaoin for Mess Turner! Run at once, She has urgent business." Janes sped away like a. shot, and was presently the door of a hansom upon Miss TUV- PT, LliLi ■quiring what direction she would give caL,,y. A: ,his very simple question Miss Turner, who was 11, rvously puiling on her gloves, flushed to her very ;iair-roots. J'tll tarn to drive to—let me think-as far as the Marble Arch,she stammered out at last; and j then she coloured again more painfully than before, having caught sight of James' grin of amusement. A. arble Arch, and hurgent business! 0 yas, veiy i,urgent!" was James' subsequent remark at § th< ivper table. "Very hurgent indeed when she thi! f got round it to Aldersgate Street and told cabby where he rea.ly was to go! But, a« it happens, I kt >v Ium, and he'll tell me all about that hurgent i. bi'^iiit*53 at tl,e Marble Arch for the price of a. ghss, Hie if he don't?" Amid the goneral admiration of the assembled | ki if-her: this interesting young man lifted his own glfcs to his lips with hearty relish. J&mM was right. No sooner had Miss Turner I f( acLod Aldersgate Street than she actually did g.ve cabby a fresh direotion. ,< J have changed my mind," she called through toe roof, with great difficulty making her voice Ileard amid the tremendous roax of the traffic at this hour. "Drive me to the Metropole." M 'fropole—very good, miss." Cabby ohuokled oomnhtcently, congratulating himself on having to Wait. for the return journey at the door of this I fash ar able hotel. Nor were his calculations vain. Wut for me," was Miss Turner's peremptory command, as die stepped lightly to the ground I without even turning her head. She knows her way about, and no mistake, she dopa!" he soliloquised, watching the imposing entrance I of his iare. He should have seen this same haughty woman a few minutes later, as she endeavoured to free herself from the passionate embrace of a dark- haired, loldierly-looking individual, in one of the (private rooms of the Metropole. But Ronald, you stifle me! "First let me hear your report. What news do you bring? Good or I bad ?" Thf £ ?nt]eman addressed as Ronald feebly framed the vorl "bad" with his lips, and then with a IlIctdpn-pring darted forward, only just in time to receive Miss Turner's fainting form in his arms again. "Good gracious! Then we must really part," she moaned, after a brief period of unconsciousness, during which her companion, with trembling fingrs, ahd face ashen as her own, had succeeded in un- cis pin-r the costly fur mantle which she wore, and 1 removii.-T her }>s. Nev-!—jylvia, my darling, we are beaten, it i# tr- I have seen the wretched creature, in vcrl able flesh and blood. A million curses on the fact! But, when that is said, all is said! We shall never part until we are parted by death! Understand me, never! My arrangements are made 'rrevorabiy. In a week's time from now, we shall b8 on our way to New Zealand, and the child— j list •■a, Sylvia—the child, who knows nothing—who ) •hall tipver know—will be with us." j t It sot-med to Sylvia as she looked out of the J hotel window upon the bustling crowd below, as | thovtrh <?he were dead, and some other woman stood t in her place. It was hope that had died in her I heart, v., hile she lived on. For the revelation of I thif hour, she had patiently waited—months was I' it, in those quiet rooms in the ancient Square? Is av. a century, surely, an eternity It..? impossible, dear Ronald, that you mat? [ it impossible, dear Ronald, that you malo t-hl" Tremendous sacrifice on my account. You are you:v.j and the fiery artbittons and golden dreams of n;: nhood "hall not be quenched in your soul by the b;ttpruess of exile, for one so unworthy as my- I *elf, Wf> must part, terrible as death though the separator will prove for me! Still, the duty Li o!e:i.r. We must part!" i Ronald took both Sylvia's hands, in his own, 1 looting tier steadfastly "in the eyes. No power of | language oould describe that glance, but it smote to the heart like a keen knife. Gradually it seemed as though all power of re- sistance to her companion's will left Miss Turner. Her head drooped forward, the firm contour of her lip? relaxod, and a shiver ran through her whole wm. „. Sylvia, my darling," he spoke at length, "in weet'i time I leave England with our child. I think you will not refuse to accompany me, dear wife, tor in the sight of heaven you are as surely tay wife aa the child is yours, and mine. What is Your ^nsTser?" '"O Ronald, dear Ronald! I dare not be left •«] behind. I should kill myself." i II. f Three clays after Miss Turner's call at the Mitropole, another excitement was created at the { establishment in Charterhouse Square, for on that Inorning she h: announced her intention of leaving ? the house.. i Needle-^ to relate, such events as visitors coming -d going were of ouly too common occurrence, but in 6111 particular case the announcement came as tremendous surprise; for, without the slightest Wstrrani for such a supposition, both mistress and No. 8 a permanent resident. Howevei, ac was usual with him, James tame smartly to the rescue of the wonder-stricken house. Why, it's as easy to read as winking your eye. jt W exclaimed, contemptuously. "Of course that dajr, I. had taken eye 4 'she hud hurgent business at the Marble Arch, -end bpre a considerable amount of winking went met with him. And they made it all *ight ap in in that lovely room at the Mettreypoll- wi-s aigh upon half an hour with him, so cabby •aid,' an< when they came out together they looked to th.itt as thieves: she was hanging quite.graceful tt On att kTm, and though the gentleman looked a vut ded more orf his food than there was any occa- *?[). .xmfideriag what a swell place he was stopping Us yf„ be smiled, and waved his hand, quite the r." Z R u: ('"ven James himself was rather astonished rowa.rds the close of that eventful day, a vulgarly attired woman rang the bell and jj a perapa. calling herself Miss Turner # kven ia tiie house? „ There's » young Ifdy of that name resides here, *ag x!tw lofty re^v of JTamee. But she is un- portil^ler in her ways, and makes very W friends," he added gratuitously, eyeing the jt i '!j'.ur-'fi powdered .cheeks with considerable dis- 1 *hkin. j J Well, I'm a relation of hers. \aa be quick i. show up to her room, young man, for qiy w«n't keep, and I can't stop here listening ^>ar .mpertinent gossip *11 day, whether her «Ubir< are bad, good, or indifferent." j 'Tame** vas so startled by this impudent address, %at, he ld the way, without going through the Uft formality of inquiring the sta-angers name I *od submitting ifc to the person Ate de.nred to see, j '^ough his eiders from Miss Turner were very | on this point. a" tu,* <io you do, nay Lady Temple? h«-heair} oowd«T«d femtie femaa* ia falia. nmotoc. and then the door was slammed vigorously in his face. His descent to the lower regions was accomplished by a series of flying leaps and bounds; but over the excitement and clatter that prevailed when he announced his new discovery we draw a veil. At the words "Lady Temple," Miss Turner rose with a cry to her feet. She bad been kneeling before an open box in which were to be seen numerous artioles of a young child's wardrobe. Who are you? And how dare you intrude upon my privacy? Ah, my God! it cannot "surely be—" Msss Turner olasped her handa before her eyes as ibough to shut out some horrid sight. Keep oool, keep cool! my lady, and you shall soon know the reason of my intrusion. Hearing from a. friend of mine that you and your husband were about to sail to New Zealand I thought I would make bold enough to ask you to take me with you as your maid." There was a wicked glitter in the woman's eyes as she spoke, and she looked like a snake about to spring upon its prey. As my maid?" repeated Miss Turner, in strangely bewildered tones, surveying her visitor from head to foot, and glancing with irrepressible aversion upon her tawdry finery and painted cheeks. I am afraid you would scarcely be suitable; besides," drawing up her slender figure to its full height, "I I never engage a servant under any circumstances, without character." A course peal, of laughter rang through the room, causing Miss Turner to start in horror. Could her first surmise be correct? Or was this creature mad. She was speedily enlightened on the poaart. Character, indeed! Well, I imagine my character will bear about as much looking into as yours. You ain't Lord Ronald Temple's lawful married wife, and I am, there's my character for you. And when he finds himself on the New. Zealand boai, there- will be two true and loving women ready to sail with him, for my passage is taken, as good as yours. But I wonH make any objections to your going out as my maid. I'm not a very particular sort, as no doubt you think. And now, if you feel inclined to do a feint, 111 ring the bell and send that agreeaJble young man you keep in this highily ganfceefl establishment up, and he'll soon bring you round. Good evening, Miss Turner, alias Miss Sylvia Brookfield, alias Lady Temple, and good- ness knows how many more grand titles to follow!" The door closed at last, and not unftil then did the poor broken hearted woman known as Miss Turner, after turning the key, sink into a chair, and covering her face with her hands, break into agonised weapmg. III. The great bell of St. Paul's was tolling midnight. Slowly and solemnly the tones pealed tllirough that silent Square, where, in the ancient Charterhouse, the weary brethren slept, and dreamed maybe of the happy days of their youth. And little did the tired inmates of the houses round know thait those solemn tones rang out the dieath kaell of one of the fairest and sweetest oreatures who had ever suffered, and hoped, and despaired in the City's callous midst. Left to herself, and to the terrible grief which had consumed her heart during many months of waiting, Miss Turner made up her mind now that she knew the worst, to sacrifice herself for the sake of him she loved best in the world; better even- than her own life. For the sake of his future," she argued (falsely or not, she will not say) for the sake of htf future, which she could only blight, and destroy, by continuing to exist, she would meet death; since he had sworn that only death should part them. A few years of sorrowful remembrance, then old associations and habits would resume their sway, and the past would fade from his vision like mist in the sunlight. Only, he would think of her fioinertunes, as one who had loved, and suffered for him. And—yes, thank God, suffered innocently. The last stroke died away, and Miss Turner, 7°,^ possessed not only of innocence, but the steadfast courage of a martyr, advanced to her dressing table, and taking from thence a small bottle labelled Poison, drank off its contents without flinch- mg.; Then, and not till then, did she write a few passionate words of farewell to Lord Ronald Temple, after which she threw herself upon her bed with a sigh of infinite weariness, and relief. The fatal step had been taken! No retracing her way back again now, into the great world of human love, and passion, and despair! Next morning Miss Turner's unusual non-appear- ance, or sign of existence, was the general subject of remark. And the housemaid, after repeatedly knocking at her door, without receiving reply, stated the fact to the proprietress, with the addition, of her own surmises on the subject. The door is locked, and there ain't no sound • whatever to be heard! It's just for all the world as though No. 8 was dead." Upon this hearing, it was decided to have the door broken open, and the scream of horror, which fell from the lips of the terrified proprietress, fol- lowing upon the discovery of Miss Turner's dead body, speedily brought' the whole household like a flock of frightened sheep into the room. Yet even the most excited of them had their doubts whether the exquisitely lovely creature before them was indeed dead, or only in some deep and heavy sleep from which she would in all probability presently awake. There she lay, her dark hair spread over the pillow in disorder, her beautiful eyes closed, their fringing lashes resting on her oval cheek, her lips slightly apart—lovely ae a vision of dreamland—lovelier even than in life. Almost at the same hour as this awful discovery in Charterhouse Square, a dissipated, dirty-looking man presented himself at the Metropole, and en- quired for Lord Ronald Templq; and strange to relate, his lordship was not unwilling to' recede this visitor. Apparently, the man's name was only too familiar to him. Anything I can do for you, Mr. Johnson?" en- quired his lordship, rising from his late breakfast, and pointing with affability to a seat. No, but there is something I can do for you, my lord. I hear you are thinking of going to New Zealand with-well, with yon sweetheart, shall I eay?" "Don't you attempt- any of that kind of im- pertinence!" thundered Lord Ronald. "No offence. I assure you. No offence what- ever. I have come to give you' a piece of news, which will make all the difference in -the world to Miss Turner-your wife I mean." Lord Ronald sprang to his feet, and would have seized the speaker by the throat, but Mr. Johnson put him quietly aside. "When I say your wife, I mean your wife; and I am prepared to swear to the fact. That other precious party who has swindled you so long belongs to me! Maybe, you won't object to take a look at this proof of what I am telling you." A dirty greasy paper was here handed to Lord Ronald. He took it with trembling hands, unfold- ing it slowly, and With beating heart. Great God I could he be dreaming ? He held the marriage certificate of Charles Johnson and Emily Walker in his possession, and the date was one year prior to the date on which he was supposed to hare entered into the bonds of wedlock with this same unscrupulous woman. But your reason for revealing this ?" he gasped at length. "Revenge, your lordship!" Mr. Johnson smiled a peouliar grim smile. ( You see when I married Emily it was done in a hurry, and according to her wish as secretly as < possible! She was a- ballet girl at the time, not earning sufficient to keep her in bread and cheese. But she was young and pretty, and it appeared you held the same opinion as me, for the moment you set eyes on her you lost your heart, or your head, or whatever folks have a mind to call it. "Awful rows went,on about that time between iig, and we agreed at last to separate. Now look here, Kmily,' said I, one day. If his lordship is green enough to swallow the bait, I won't interfere. Only y«u mind and provide me with plenty of cash.' She promised, and. more than that, she kept her word until that rich Jew came along and persuaded her to trip off to Paris. She was not unwilling either, for she often declared to me that her life with you wae as dull as ditch-water, and that you kept her shorter of money than when she earned her own living. After she quitted the country how- | ever, I heard nothing more of her, until^ I read the announcement of her death in the Times. But Charles Johnson was not bamfoozled by a. silly trick like that No, I hunted her up, made a. scene before the Jew fellow and demanded my conjugal rights. He slunk out of the affair alto- gether, having long wanted the opportunity, I guess, a~H then she swore to be revenged on you,; for in her blind mad rr-ge she thought you had set me on her track. But I have had my revenge on her instead, and put a cheerful end to her blackmailing in your quarter!" "Stop a moment," cried Lord RonaJd, as Mr. Johnson was about to retire. "If you are in need of money, take these," thrusting a handful of notes into the man's band. "You have made me the happiest creature alive to-day I" How that otip, brimming over with almost deliri. ous delight, which Lord Ronald Temple had held so briefly to his lips, was dashed for ever to the ground on his arrival at Charterhouse Square we may imagine only too well! Sylvia, the being for whom he was about to sacrifice birth, nsune, the ambitions of his race, and the hope of all future advancement in his special sphere TO dead. "dead, the victim of that most cruel, and yejiismou* of all human vices, revenge. The End.

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