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¥ ------. (NEWS NOTES.

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-----------+_.---- -------WRECK…

IGERMANY AND THE VATICAN.

------A VISIT TO THE CLAIMANT.

HEAVY CLAIM FOR DAMAGE BY…

------------------------------.--.---ISUICIDE…

u.''* MR. CHAMBERLAIN, M.P.,…

.THE NEW PEER.

--.--PRESENCE OF MIND.

A MANIA FOR CLIMBING.

[No title]

fTIIE SUPPOSED MURDER IN SHROP-…

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fTIIE SUPPOSED MURDER IN SHROP- I SHIRE. I The prisoners Thomas and Eliza Mayos were recently I cojveyed by train frena Shrewsbury to Wellington. The female prisoner fainted at the railway station. A large crowd began to collect in front of the court at nine o'clock, and when the ma.risieriai proceedings commenccd at eleven o'clock the court was densely packed. The prisoners having been placed in the dock, were formally charged with the murder of Mary E. Mayos, aged 10, at Kinnersley. The depositions of the witnesses at tho former hearing were read over, being chiefly evidence as to the discovery and identification of the remains. The prosecution was again conducted by Mr Feeie, clerk of the ponce for the connty the prisoners were not represented by counsel. In opening the case, I Ir. Peele said it would be a very long sitting, as there were a great number of witnesses to be called. He proceeded to describe the facts. The first witness called was Police- constable Challoner, who found the legs in Apley Pool, after considerable search and dragging, subsequent to the finding of the head. Air. Hicks, a neighbour of th,' prisoners, remembered the arrival of the prisoners at Kinnersley with fonr children, on the Thursday after Christmas Day. When they arrived he lifted the iittlo girl down, and was shocked to find her so very light for a girl of ten. He afterwards went into the prisoners' house to offer the little girl something to eat. The male prisoner was annoyed at this, and threatened the witness. In answer to the male prisoner, Jhe witness denied that he was inebriated on the ocftision but the female prisoner created some sensation by assert- ing from the dock that he was, and that he behaved indecently. Elizabeth Hughes stated that on January 10 the girl, whom witness had not seen before, came to her house. She then had two black eyes, a wound, and a bruise on the right arm,and was in a dirty state. She said she was starving, and asked for some- thing to eat, and to be allowed to warm herself. Evi- dence was also given as to the female prisoner having been seen on the road near Apley, carrying a covered basket. The medical testimony was to the effect that a severe blow was inflicted on the head of the girl before death. A sensation was caused in court by the evidence of a brother of the deceased, aged 13, who spoke of the systematic cruelty of his stepmother to the deceased. He was told by the female prisoner to say that Polly bad been taken away dressed, and was not coming back." In answer to the formal charge, the male prisoner said he had nothing to add to the statement he had previously ma de. When he found the child dead he helped to cut the body up in pieces. The female prisoner made a long statement. She said she left the girl alone in the house, and return- ing tea minutes after found her with hV head doubled under her. She put her in a warm bath, and rolled her :n a blanket. Her husband afterwards came in, and she told him that Polly was in a fit or dead. He called I roily," took hold of her and kissed her, and said— She is dead, I am afraid yet I don't know, she went like this once before," He said h" should fetch a doctor, but she (the female prisoner) said, "Don't leave me;" but she thought when he went out he would fetch a doctor, and she expected one all day. She had done nothing to the child to injure her life. When her hus- band came home she said, Oh, Tom it's all over. I am sure now that she is dead." He kept saying lie did not know what to do, as they ought to have had a doctor at the time. She said the same. The woman, who appeared greatly distressed as she was making the statement, said they at length went to bed. The body was still wrapped up in a blanket, and she never saw it again. Her husband did what was done to it, but she gave him the string with which to tie up some of the parts. After that had been done her husband lodked very wild and said, Oh, what have I done? I cannot live, I cannot live." She tried to console him by saying that he had never injured the child's life. He placed the body in a basket, and sh;- walked to Wellington with it, then rode to Shrewsbury, and walked to Atcham, dropping the body into the river by the side. On a subsequent day she took the head and dropped it into the pool. She knew nothing of what had become of any other portion of the body. Both the prisoners wept bitterly at the conclusion of this statement. They were then committed for trial at the next assizes for Shrop- shire, and were afterwards taken back to Shrewsbury Gaol.

EXTRAORDINARY CONDUCT IN A…

THE OUTRAGE ON A WELSH FARMER.…

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