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LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

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LONDON CORRESPONDENCE. (We deem it ril;ht to state that we do not identify our- selves with our Correspondent's opinions..] THE announcement that Mr. Gladstone would not be present in his place when Parliament opened, but would remain at Cannes until his health was thoroughly restored, naturally caused some surprise after t,he glowing accounts which correspondents had given of the marked im- provement effected in his appearance by change of air and climate after he had gone to reside at the ChateauScott. The fact that the right honour- able gentleman seemed in a frame of mind fully to enioy the spectacular displays and tomfooleries of the Carnival at Nice seemed also to indicate that he had recovered elasticity of spirits as well as bodily health. But it is better that he should remain where he is until he feels assured thathe is in good form for resuming his Parliamentary duties than that he should run the risk, when there is so much work to be done, of getting into harness again too soon. The place of the Prime Minister will, until his return be taken, so far ai the leadership of the House of Commons is concerned, by the Marquis of Hartington, who was also appointed to act as host at the State dinner given at the Premier's official residence at Downing-street on the eve of the meeting of Parliament. The absence of Mr. Gladstone would, no doubt, be regretted by his colleagues at the Cabinet meetings at which the Queen's Speech was under consideration but it may be taken for granted that they would be in telegraphic communication with him as to Its contents, which was understood to have been discussed at two separate sittings. The newspaper editors, who have a staff of leader-writers to keep in occupation, have some reason to feel a sense of satisfaction when Parlia- ment resumes its labours at Westminster. It relieves them from the necessity of casting about in all directions in search of subjects which can bear the strain of discursive treatment to the full length of a column. It had become pretty evident of late that the rcdarteurs-en-chef were sometimes at their wits' end for topics but now they have plenty to choose from, and p litical pens, in the coming months, will be quite as active as Parliamentary tongues. The last half-yearly meeting of the shareholders of the Crystal Palace was perhaps the most grati- fying one ever held, as a highly favourable report was given of the state of the finances. The electric light and gas exhibitions seem to have attracted a steady stream of visitors for months 1m end, which pays much better than overflowing Attendances on certain days when there is some- thing specially attractive in the entertainments. There is reason to believe that if arrangements could have been made to hold the forthcoming Fisheries Exhibition at the Crystal Palace instead of South Kensington it would have proved more satisfactory, not only to Londoners, but to intend- ing visitors to the metropolis. Proof of this is afforded by the popularity which the exhibition of electrical apparatus attained. There is a prospect of abundant work in London for thousands of artificers and labourers for years to come. In addition to the extensive street improvements which the Metropolitan Board of Works have in hand, there will be the construction of two bridges across the Thames- One aL Hammersmith for general traffic, and the other a new railway bridge projected by the London, Chatham, and Dover Company, in con- nection with their new large central station which is to be built at Queen ictoria-street on a site lyins between Blackfriars-bridge and the Old Swan Pier. The new bridge, of which a com- mencement has already been made on the north side, will be hardly twenty paces from their existing railway-bridge which leads to Ludgate- hill Station. It is not so long ago since the same company incurred considerable expense by erect- ing a terminus at Holborn Viaduct, which will be superseded, in due course, by the new great station to be erected in Queen Victoria-street. If the company had continued ilackfriars Station, which could have been enlarged to any extent, as their London terminus, it would have saved them a vast outlay in bridges. London-bridge Station loses nothing from being on the same side of the river as Blackfriars Station. It is also rumoured that the existing bridge is to be widened to the extent of another double set of rails. voung ladies who are occupied in shops, dress- making and millinery establishments, telegraph offices, and other businesses now open to women, complain very much, and not without cause, apparently, at the difficulty they experience in getting respectable lodgings in good localities at a reasonable rate. When they go on the search for apartments they find that the cards in the windows almost invariably announce that the rooms to let are for gentlemen; and when the words Hooms to let only appear, they find on application, much to their chagrin and disappoint- ment, that young gentlemen are preferred, and that young ladies, in fact, are not wanted at all. This is rather hard usage for respectable young women, who must make a livelihood for them- selves, and it can hardly avoid having the effect of forcing them to take any kind of lodgings in which they can obtain accommodation. The announcement that General Booth has at last come to the conclusion to keep the parades and performances of the Salvation Army fanatics within the limits of their own property, can tcarcely fail to give satisfaction to all who have witnessed the extravagances characterising the open air processions and indoor services of that over-demonstrative Sect. The manner in which the Salvationists conducted themselves in their marches in the streets showed unmistakably that the force largely consisted of rowdies of both sexes, who seemed quite in their element when bawling out Glory! Glory and thumping tambourines. But, notwithstanding the resolu- tion to which General Booth has come, it will take some time before quiet is restored on Sundays in the vicinity of the Grecian Theatre in the City-road,jwhere disorderly crowds assemble for the purpose of having tussles with the Salvationists, and where a large posse of police have to be kept on duty when meetings are being held within the converted place of entertainment. The gallery piay-goers, who were in the habit of fre-jUentirg the Grecian, seem quite unable to forgive the Salvationists forgetting possession of the theatre by purchase. Some music-hall proprietors have been prose- cuted for permitting dramatic performances on their premises without any license. But this seems hardly fair when it is well enough known that amateur theatricals, for benevolent pur- poses or otherwise, frequently take place in joncert-rooms without being interfered with, and the same thing also happens at private parties. Do not charades acted in character come within the category of dramatic performances, and g ho did not they also require a license, if the old law, which should be consideredobsolete,] is to be maintained? D. G.

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