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'F LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

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'F LONDON CORRESPONDENCE. [We deem it riirht to state that we (1,) not identify our. selves w5tLi our Correspondent's opinions.J THE circular of Lord Granville, as leader of the Liberal party in the House of Lords, relating to the opening of Parliament, was a mere formal announcement of the fact, whereas Mr. Gladstone, in his circular, sought to impress upon the sup- porters of the Government in the House of Com- mons the desirability of early attendance on account of the importance of the business to be brought under their consideration. These two circulars, the one formal and the other urgent, serve to indicate the respective shares which the two Houses will have in the work of the session about to begin. The heaviest share of it must inevitably fall upon the House of Commons, where the chief measures are sure to be introduced. The Earl of Dalhousie, in a speech made some little time ago, stated that the late Earl of Beaconsfield was reported to have said, after his elevation to the peerage, that he felt as if he had got into the Elysian heIde, the peacefulness was 80 marked and soothing after the tumults and contentions of the House of Commons." At the same time Lord Dalhousie claimed that, if the general aspect of the Upper House differed widely from that of the Commons, the former had, nevertheless, important legislative work to perform, and did it, for the most part, in a quiet and effective way. This opinion will be endorsed by thoughtful observers of the workings of both Houses. To Lord Beaconsfield the change would seem more marked than to the majority of men who enjoy the distinction of being transferred from the one House to the other, as he had always been in the thick of the battle when he was a member cf the House of Commons. JIembers of the Liberal party do not seem to have quite agreed among themselves as to "whether the County Franchise Bill or the County Government Bill should take precedence in point of time in being brought under the consideration of Parliament. Some adduce reasons in favour of the one having precedence, and some in favour of the other. But the probability is, that as the County Franchise Bill must necessarily involve a redistribution of seats, it will not be introduced until the following session. But we have not long to wait now for an authoritative announce- ment on the subject in the Queen's Speech when Parliament opens. The notices which have already appeared in the newspapers about the next University Boat Race, and the holding of a Volunteer Review at Brighton on Easter Monday, make Londoners aware that they are again on the brink of a new spring season. The operations of the boat crews on their home rivers have been attracting the notice of experts for some time, and it is com- plained that the old fault is being repeated of making too many changes, especially of the stroke, when training is in progress. Of course, some weeding is always necessary when special weaknesses are shown by selected oarsmen but slhis is too often carried to excess, the fresh hands liot having enjoyed the benefit of enough training when the final arrangements for the race are made. In the coming season the Fisheries Exhibition at South Kensington, which is to be opened on the 1st of May, promises to be on a very exten- sive scale, and to prove highly attractive to People of all classes, as they have all an equal ttnterest in the improvement of means for in- creasing and facilitating the supply of fish food. The buildings which have been prepared for the purpose are on the site of the Horticultural Gardens, familiar to the frequenters of the International Exhibition, which was held there three years in succession. No efforts are being spared to make the Fisheries Exhibition a com- plete success, and it is confidently expected that her Majesty the Queen will open it in person. ït is far from creditable, considering the vast extent of the seaboard of the British Islands and the large portion of the population engaged in fishing pursuits, that the means and appliances for providing the fish supply should have con- tinued so long in what can only be called a primi- tive state. It is only within comparatively recent years that improvements in the construc- tion of fishing boats, rendering them more safe and efficient than they formerly were, have taken place, and a great impetus in the same direction may be expected to result from the South Ken- sington Exhibition. During the recent gales, a Yarmouth fishing boat which was run down at night, with the loss of all hands, showed no lights on board; and this is only one indication of the primitive way of prosecuting their hazardous calling to which fishermen are so prone to adhere. In the newspaper accounts of the recent heavy ga.12s it was only accidents of a more serious kind, involving loss of life or considerable destruction of property, that received special notice; but much unrecorded damage was done, in connec- tion with house property and gardens, both in the metropolis and its suburbs. The wind played havoc with many conservatories where these stood in exposed situations. Owing to the door of a large conservatory in the garden at The Chestnuts, U enmark-hill. London, having been un- fortunately left open while the wind was blowing in strong, sweeping gusts, the large dome was blown off, and pieces of the shattered glass seriously mutilated a magnificent fern, said to have been the largest and most perfect in the country, which gained prizes more than once at shows in the Crystal I'alace, where it always attracted great attention when it made its appear- ance in a gigantic pot. The attention of the Home Secretary has been drawn, none too soon, to the rather alarming cir- cumstance that about two million gallons of pe- troleum are stored in different parts of the metro- polis, and that of these a large quantity is housed close to the Thames. Fires are so frequent in the metropolis that this extensive storage of an inflammable and explosive oil in populous districts must necessarily cause great risks to be run. It is frightful to think what destruction might result to shipping on the river if a fire were to break out in petroleum oil stores adjoining the wharves. The supposed impossibility of setting the Thames on fire would then be overcome with a vengeance. As petroleum is now largely in use, storage must be found for it somewhere; but the safeguards, which it is the duty of the Home Secretary to inquire into, should be of a kind to allay apprehension. The coincidence was rather a strange one, that at the time when the Prime Minister of England was staying abroad to recruit his health the new French Premier was prostrated with illness and the Chancellor of the German Empire was announced to be in a state which created alarm. As regards Prince Bismarck, the coincidence was made still further remarkable by the fact that the aged Emperor William was also unwell at the same time. M. Fallieres, the French Premier, was in the middle of a speech on the question of the expulsion from France of mem- bers of former reigning families, when he was taken suddenly ill, and it might probably be accounted for by the excitement of the occasion, as strong feeling was exhibited in the Chamber. Accord- ing to the latest accounts, Mr. Gladstone has benefited so much by change of air that he will be found in his place when Parliament re- assembles, D. G.

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JA SELF-MADE MAN.

A POLICEMAN CHARGED WITH ASSAULT.

THE ALLEGED EXTENSIVE SMUGGLING…

THE MURDER OF PROFESSOR PALMER…

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FATAL SNOWSLIP IN AMERICA.I

DESTRUCTION OF A NEW YORK…

THE LOSS OF THE "CIMBRIA."

CHARGE OF MURDER AGAINST A…

APPREHENDED ON A WEDDING MORNING.

HAVE IT IN YOUR HOUSE-LAMPLOUGRYS…

SHOCKING ATTEMPT AT SUICIDE.

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SAD RAILWAY FATALITY.

--THE HOLYWELL SHOOTING CASE.

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