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[BY JOHN JONES.] The following paragraph appeared last week, not in the Skibbereen Eagle, but in the Holywell Observer The quarterly meeting of the Calvinistic Methodist Association, which is better known as • oasiwny Bala" will be held next week in HolywelL" Not so bad, that but in the next column I found an announcement which would indicate the Holywell organ has a sphere of usefulness not exclusively confined to the quiet of Holy- well, but presumably it exercises a potent in- fluence throughout the universe. Here it is Births.—April 1st, at Mold, Flintshire, the wife of ————— of a son. JFOftEIGN PAPERS PLEASE COPY! I remember a similar instance some months ago, whereby this paper was the means of averting "a second Crimean War." The editor has something to do with a loeal volun- teer corps, and at the time when the county was ablaze with the fizzle and fireworks of Beaconsfield's anti-Russian fiasco, he gushed forth weekly his thoughts on foreign policy. But his martial prowess did not cease there. No, no. £ t will be remembered the Emperor of Russia was said to be averse to laying tha whole of the Treaty of San Stefano before the Berlin Congress, and the British Fleet was told to the Dardanelles. Now there was a chance for Holywell to get its name up. The volun- teers were called out one night, and the Cap- tain asked how many of the band assembled would be ready to fight the Russians in case Her Majesty required them. The Captain held out his bare sword, and placed his hat on the point of it, inciting others to follow his ex- ample. A few of them trembling shouldered their arms to signify assent. Then the band struck up, and all marched up and down the streets brandishing their swords and bayonets and yelling forth a kind of a war whoop. Of course the ordinary inhabitants were awe- stricken, and several mammas, wives, and sis- ters wept bitter tears at the possibility of their beloved ones being called out. That night's performance ended in the gallant corps being regaled with the customary pint of beer. But even that was not all. For during the whole of this gorgeous display had not the special commissioner of the Observer with keen eye observed all this, and he sat up late to send forth to the world a vivid description of the exciting scene. The paper came out that week, and the Emperor of Russia having read the account in the Observer became so terrified that he decided to give in on all points, and the Berlin Congress was speedily arranged. So much for the Holywell Observer. Your readers will have become heartily sick of electioneering .news ere this, so that it would be absurd for me to add to the abundance of political philosophy which is daily being in- flicted upon the public. But still many inci- dents of a non-political nature crop up during an election. It is during election time that a locality displays what local talents it may be blessed with it is a time to show the dearth or plenty of speakers. Whilst some constituencies are troubled with too many men that can and must speak, the county of Carnarvon is miser- ably behind in the possession of oratorical talent. A few preachers and fewer laymen only can cut a decent figure on a plat- form. But there are others who, ever ready to make themselves conspicuous and to puff up their own importance will always elbow their way to the front, and at the risk of making themselves look fools before an audience, will inflict upon sensible men the most miserable trash. I noticed several in- stances of this during the Carnarvonshire election and particularly at one of Mr Watkin Williams' meetings,when some one pushed him- self in front of all to show what I call the height of his indiscretion and impudence. To a man in any stage of life it is not courteous to talk of his tomb, but to drag a tombstone before the eyes of a man who approaches the sunset of life is gross cruelty. I believe many must have felt indignant to hear this man be- fore an audience of some thousands telling an old gentleman over eighty years of age what he would do on his tombstone. But I think the chairmen of meetings are much to blame for allowing these meddlers to spoil the effects of otherwise successful meeting. I have admired the earnest manner in which the Chief Consta le of Carnarvonshire has taken up his duties and he deserves compli- ment for having effected a remarkable improve- ment in the force. I do not wish to meddle in the business of other people, but I think in the interests of justice, Major Clayton ought to re- move even the possibility of the inference that he is a partial man. In most of the cases tried by the magistrates, the police are the prosecutors, and Major Clayton is the head of the police. I do not beHeve any unjust influ- ence would be used, but it certainly would look better if the Chief Constable refrained from sitting on the bench in such cases. T ## 1 have often sought to know what are the qualifications to become an officer in a militia qualifications to become an officer in a militia regiment and instances are not rare which encourage the doubt whether a military know- ledge is essential. In a few days the regi- Dlents in these counties will assemble, and then commences the "jolly time" for the young itnpplings who assume the command of our ocal soldiery. If rigid discipline is the first r»WT8 military efficiency in the case of ,Vary soldiers, is it not still more necessary e ca.se of those of superior rank ? The JE? „ .aming> assuredly, should be |lon /°r inculcating practice into the heads of officers-granting, of course, that that is feasible-as it is for training the ordinary amateur soldier in the use of arms. Why should not subalterns be subject to the same arbitrary rule as privates? For my own part, I think it is ridiculous that officers should be excused from the first and sometimes the second daily parade by simply making their appearance for a few minutes at the close of the morning drill- In more than one regimeut this is a custom which decidedly ought to be stopped.

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