Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

A PLEA FOR WALES.

News
Cite
Share

A PLEA FOR WALES. During the debate in the House of Commons, on. Thursday night, on the Bill for granting Ireland a million and a quarter of money for intermediate education, Mr Henry Richard said he did not grudge Ire- land any educational advantages that ini-ht be conferred upon her but it was impossible not to be struck by the contrast between the profuse liberality displayed by the Government towards Ireland, in the matter of education, and the miserable and grudging spirit shown towards the Principality of Wales, to which the Government had just refused the request of an important depu- tation for some aid. He was not sure that the people of Wales were not too peaceable and loyal, and if they were to start a Fenian and Home Rule movemer.t, the Government would not be more disposed to listen to their voice (hear). He ob- jected to the Bill because it was a violation of a great principle, and foreshadowed measures of a dangerous character which would logically follow from it. The Bill started from the sound principle. that when the State dealt with education, it could only deal with secular education, but it after- wards d eparted from this principle, and the sys- tem of result fees was nothing less than the en- dowment of the denominational schools. Mr Davies, referring to what had been said by the Chief Secretary for Ireland in answer to the hon. member for Merthyr, admitted that that money belonged to the Irish people, and did not grudge them it. At the same time the people of Wales asked for a very moderate sum-nan.ely, £ <s500—for a Welsh University, and he was sorry the Government did not grant it. The Welsh people were exerting themselves in the matter, and he himself was happy to subscribe towards the institution; but the Government might surely give a small amount of help in aid of voluntary contributions. His constituents told him that until the Welsh members obstructed business in the same way as the Irish members did they would never get anything (a laugh). He did not want to do that, but he only warned the Govern- ment not to put the Welsh members in that posi- tion. There had been a wonderful change in the House since that Bill was introduced. The measure was thought by persons out of doors to be a sop thrown to the Irish members in order to keep them quiet, that the Government might finish the work of the season (a laugh). There were in Wales about a million and a half of very loyal subjects, who did not give any trouble or put the country to any expense. They and their represen- tatives took what they could get, but they wished to stand up for their rights. He, therefore, trusted that the Government would not refuse the small grant of £ 2500 towards enabling the people of Wales to obtain in the principality that higher education for which they could not go to Oxford or Cambridge (hear). He was under a pledge, if the GovernmentHvould only give £ 2590 for a college in Wales, to contribute X4000 over and above the sum he had already paid towards the same object (hear, hear). The strike among the men in the employment of

[No title]

--THE BIRKENHEAD NATIONAL…

[No title]

LIFE-BOAT SERVICE IN NOKTH…

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

Y WASG (AMERICAN), JULY 20.

THE WESLEFM CONFERENCE.