Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

[No title]

[No title]

WHO GAVE US PEACE?

I MAP OF CYPRUS <

AN IMPEACHMENT OF THE PREMIER.

[No title]

ISERIOUS STABBING AFFRAY AT…

[No title]

FLINTSHIRE ASSIZES.

[No title]

HOUSE (,,! L.OR!)-. , D

News
Cite
Share

HOUSE (, L.OR!)-. D Earl Granville, stored that L.' j. ta; the at vice tendert-d him u.i the pre\ ts ni^ '.y Ln Salisbury, and h:v, consult.. Te j- </ 'lopcoui Jit ita/t/iiea iii order :o obtain i..c inr.lou in. desired as to the existence of slavery in tne Island of Cyprus. Lord Salisbury's sneering staten., i,, that this well-known work contained all that it I was nccessiiry to kijow (Ill Li,e .^ulijeefc was HUC true and Lord Granville now repeated the re- quest to the Government to give the countiy ex- plicit inforumtion. The Foreign Minister replied that as Syr Garnet Wolseley had not yet arrived on the island he had had no opportunity to prepare a report. As soon as his report was presented, "the Government would take such action in the matter as they might deem proper." Lord Car- dwell pointed out that Cyprus was now a Crown colony, where the English flag was flying, and asked whether the noble marquis meant to say that in such a case slavery could possibly exist in that territory. Lord Salisbury made no reply to this question, and, after some remarks from Lord Lilford as to the climate of the island, the subject dropped. The Roads and Bridges (Scotland) Bill was read a second time. A motion by Lord Rosebury, supported by Lord Granville, referring the measure to a Select Committee, was negatived. HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY. At the morning sitting of the House of Com- mons, Mr W. H. Smith stated, in answer to Lord R. Montagu, that at present no further informa- tion was to hand as to the seizure by the Russians of two officers of the Swiftsure as prisoners of war. Admiral Hornby had telegraphed that General Todleben assured him that he knew nothing of the occurrence, and extremely regretted what had taken place. The Marquis of Hartingtou asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether it was his intention to make a statement to the House upon the Berlin Treaty and the Cyprus Conven- tion. Sir Stafford Northcote said that undoubt- edly some opportunity for a discussion of the sub- ject should be given, but the date would depend upon whether any antagonistic motion was to be brought forward. If there was no intention to propose any such resolution, he would make a statement on Monday week. The Marquis of Hartington then announced that lie would on an early day call attention to the papers that had been presented, and move a resolution. The noble lord urged that, considering the advanced period of the Session, the debate should take place at once. HOUSE OF LORDS.—TUESDAY. The Earl of Camperdown asked for a detailed statement of the financial agreement made with Turkey in regard to Cyprus. The noble lord said the arrangement was that England should pay the Porte the excess of revenue over the expenditure of Cyprus, calculated upon the average of the last five years. He spoke of the present miserable state of the island, and expressed the opinion that when the bill came to be paid, it would be found that England was involved in an expenditure not of thousands but of millions. The Marquis of Salis- bury said the arrangement which had been made was a fair and liberal one, and the Government hoped that under British rule the island would maintain a large population and yield a large revenue. Earl Granville complained of the secrecy of the transaction and, as an instance of the inaccuracy of Ministerial statements, he re- marked that the Prime Minister had told them that the port of Batoum was only capable of hold- ing six vessels when very closely packed, whereas at one time it held the Turkish fleet of thirteen men-of-war, together with transports. Lord Beaconsfield said that documents relating to the whole transaction would be submitted to Parlia- ment when public affairs were in a state to permit their presentation. After another unsuccessful effort of Lord Cardwell to obtain from the Govern- ment some satisfactory assurance as to the aboli- tion of slavery on the island, the debate terminated. HOUSE OF COMMONS.—TUESDAY. Mr Hopwood gave notice of his intention to question the Attorney-General as to the period fixed for future Assizes, and especially for the third civil Assize in Liverpool and Manchester. In answer to Mr Goschen, Mr Bourke stated that it was not intended to lay any furthar papers on the table relative to the Anglo-Turkish Conven- tion. Mr Gladstone thereupon gave notice that he would ask for the Schouvaloff-Salisbury agree- ment, which, he said, "must have been omitted accidentally." Sir W. V. Harcourt's question as to the administration of justice in Cyprus was answered by the Attorney-General, who said that her Majesty's jurisdiction would be exercised under the Foieign Jurisdiction Act, and in as simple a manner as if the Queen had acquired it by cession or conquest of territory. British subjects would have justice administered to them according to their own laws; while natives of Cyprus passing into other parts of the Sultan's dominions would be treated as Turkish subjects. -Mr Sullivan afterwards brought forward his motion that a new writ should be issued for the count of Clare, on the ground that the present member, Sir Bryan O'Loghlen, had accepted the office of Attorney-General in Victoria, and seemed to have no intention of returning to this country to take his seat. Mr Sullivan admitted that there was no precedent for the course he proposed, but urged that the usual care of the House for the interest of the constituencies should lead it to adopt his motion. The Chancellor of the Ex- chequer considered that the House should proceed more solemnly and gravely in the matter, and proposed the appointment of a Select Committee to take it into consideratien. The original motion was negatived, and the amendment agreed to.- Mr Gladstone, in introducing his motion for an address to the Crown praying that directions be given that all proceedings under the Indian Ver- nacular Press should be reported to the Secretary of State, and laid before Parliament from time to time, traced the history of the freedom of the Press in India, and complained that that freedom had been infringed in a very sudden and precipi- tated manner. It was a matter for regret that Lord Salisbury should have fettered the Press without first consulting the Indian Government; and for satisfaction, that when the Act was submitted to the Council, so good a Conservative as the Duke of Buckingham objected to it. The right hon. gentleman complained of the unfairness of im- posing these restrictions only upon native news- papers; and, admitting the difficulties of the subject, asked the House to adopt his motion as the most moderate that could have been brought forward under the circumstances.—Mr O'Donnell moved a long amendment, condemning in strong language the policy adopted by the Government of India. The debate was continued by Sir G. Campbell, Mr Smollett, and several other members. Mr Gladstone's motion was negatived by 208 against 152. HOUSE OF COMMONS.—WEDNESDAY. Mr E. Jenkins referred to the appointment on Tuesday of a Select Committee to inquire into the case of Sir B. O'Loghlen, who has not taken his seat on account of having accepted the position of Attorney-General in Victoria. The hon. member said it was well-known that Mr Childers, Mr Roe- buck, and himself had held office under Colonial Governments while occupying seats in the House, and suggested that the inquiry should be extended to a consideration of the whole question. The Chancellor of the Exchequer thought that this would be un advisable, considering the late period of the Session, and that the inquiry should be limited to the particular point referred to the committee. The House afterwards went into committee on the Cattle Diseases Bill.

[No title]

ILENBIGHSHIEE ASSIZES.

[No title]

[No title]

A FRENCH TRAGEDY.

CATTLE,