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MAIV>*

■ -.VUTUQUAKS A* '--'\.1\l't\u,).,1'.....!4...J.'-

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More cannibalism AT SEA.

SEIZURE OF A BRITISH VESSEL.

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THE ADJOURNED INQUEST.

- NEW DRY DOCK FOR SWANSEA.

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EXTRAORDINARY DIVORCE SUIT.…

THE TRAGEDY IN PARIS.

-------------THE QUEEN'S FAMILY…

-..-,_-SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST…

THE POLITICALI SITUATION.I

POLITICAL ITEMS. j

COU ST Y DO W S BLEOTIO:

IGENERAL GORDON.

----+---ITRAGIC END OF A STIL\NGE…

I FIGURES OF SPEECH.

---_.n__-ACCIDENT TO THR MARQUIS…

MIDNIGHT COLLISION IN THE…

'i IfE li.itW. -ilY AT IlOSTjjr,…

SRHJoUS 1 Kj-vAli Nir 4

THE CAE 11 PHIV COLLIERY EXPLon.

LAST NIG UT'« GAZETTE."

STiiANGE BIIEACH OF PROMISE…

THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE…

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THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE PICTORIAL PRESS. The first illustrated paper worthy of the name was the Mercurius Civicus, which came into existence in the second year of the Civil War. Most of its illustrations were portraits, and sometimes the same woodcut was used to repre- fent more than one person "—a most convenient practice. For example, the portrait of Prince Rupert, 166, did duty for the Marquis of New- castle in another number. But pictorial art flourished not in those turbulent times, though during the Civil War hundreds of tracts and newspapers were published. Iu 1704 we find the Postman springing into existence, and a whole host of imitators—the Postboy, the Weekly Journal, the London Journal, and Head's Journal. Then foHowed the Grub-street Journal, whicn came out with an illustration in 1730 —a whole page being filled with woodcuts of the arms of the City com- panies. This paper was the first to use copper- plates for its engravings. The Daily Post of March 29, 1740, is another early example of a daily paper attempting to illustrate current event?. But to give even the barest summary of the subsequent development of the illustiatad paper from such small beginnings is impossible. So we pa.ss on to the establishment of the Observer, which came out on Sunday, December 4th, 1791. Many years elapsed before wood engraving began to be used as a means of popular illustration, and it was the Observer that first availed itself of the art. But it had previously had recourse to the expensive method of engraving on copper, giving in 1815 a copper plate view of the island of St. Helena, and three years later a PORTRAIT OF A MURDERER. Other papers followed suit, such as the Sunday Times, the Weekly Chronicle, and Bell's Life. The Observer made a great reputation by its enterprise in reporting and illustrating the Cato-street con- spiracy, and on March 5, 1820, published an exterior view of the stable where the conspirators met and a section of the grenade to be used. Again, we find the Observer in 1820 giving a woodcut entitled, "A faithful Representation of the In- terior of the House of Lords as prepared for the Trial of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Caroline in 1821 views of the interior of the House of Commons. Its coronation number had a great sale. Nothing like it had ever been done before, and the public eagerly paid the double price for the sake of the engravings. Fourpence was paid for stamp duty on each sheet, amounting on the whole to £2,000 paid to Government for stamp duty, exclusive of paper duty. The number consisted of two sheets, each of which had a sale of 60,000 copies. In 1823 the murder of Mr Weare by Thurtell was seized upon as a fair subject for its draughts- man. Weare was shot on October 24th, 1823. and on November 10th the Observer published five illustrations of the murder. But this was not all. The spirited editor actually issued a »psci d Weare and Thurtell supplement with the fullest details and additional illustra- tions. Thece were hyper-senaiti VEt persons even in those days who talked about the bad taste of such b. pubKo.ifcion by a high-class" paper. "We are aware," says the Observer, "that by some these illustrations will be condemned as lu a W1TH taste. curiosity o/tt,VDubiioI},ere the feellngs and the and where so ^<rULar "aiid~^r?iHr^uch excited, has been £ ,wofnd araeu" ,-vidity upon a subject so every possible light who may entertain perhaps "a ^trust that those tion to our plan will for a moment indulgence, and permit us to meet the wishes of persons who may not be so fastidious as them selves." Bell's Life, on November 28, 1824, gave the first huge woodcut of a prize fight, entitled the Tip-top Milling at Warwick. and in 1825 the same paper published a cut of Liston as Paul Pry. A series of caricatures were also contribu- ted to the pages of Bell's Life by Cruikshank, Seymour, and Kenny Meadows. Meanwhile the Observer pursued its career of illustration, and, undeterred by former censure, pre- sented pictures—William Corder, the murderer of Maria Marten, and the famous red barn—to its readers of the Siamese twins, the Death of George I V., the Coronation of his Successor, the Attempted Assassination of Louis Philippe by Fieschi, the Coronation of the Queen, and a Wedding Number on the Marriage. The last of the Observer illustrations appeared on July 12, 1847, on the installation of Prince Albert as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. The first number of the Weekly Chronicle appeared in September, 1836, launching out at once as an illustrated paper. The Chronicle selected criminal records as its favourite subjects. The details of the Greenacre murder were profusely illustrated, and the sale of the paper rose to 130,000 copies. After the appearance of the Illustrated London News, the Observer, Bell's Life, and the Weekly Chronicle gradually abandoned the pictures. The first number of the Illustrated London NEWS" appeared on May 14,1842, and contained sixteen printed pages and thiity-two woodcuts, the price being sixpence. Mr Ingram had many difficul- ties to contend with, but he was full of courage and energy, Se¡Z11Jg upon every opportunity to consolidate the strength of the paper, often denying himself sleep one or two nights a week. He made it a rule to spare no expense in every department of the journal; whatever money could command for its success he resolved to have. And so through wars and revolutions Mr Ingram s venture flourished, as it was sure to do under so spirited a chief. For Mr Ingram was ever on the alert, and made opportunities where other men would have lost them. For instance, when a new Archbishop of Canterbury was installed, the number of the paper contaiaing an engraving of the ceremony was sent to every clergyman in Lngland. After the success of the IUudrated London News was well assured, it was, of course, imitated, and followed the host of illus- trated papers with which all are familiar.

A P, OY AL ^TU D ^ Nl^VT-…

A FRAUDULENT COMM- ~ CI -…

ELECTION INTELLIGENCE.

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CARDIFF. i

PENARTH.

NEWPORT

BLAINA.

EBBW VALE.

FOREST OF DEAN.

MERTHYR.

ABERDARE.

RHONDDA VALLEY.

LLWYNYPIA.

PONTYPRIDD.

NEATH.

IBRECON.I

SWANS KA.

LLANELLY.

THE CHEPSTOW INHIBITION.

SUICIDE OF A BIRMINGHAM MAN…

------THE WHALLEY WILL CASE.

A BEGGAR OF FORTUNE.

-------_-THE CHANCELLOR" OF…

A NOVELTY IN CRIME.

A DANIEL COME TO JUDGMENT.

-----LOCAL LAW CASE.

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THE NILE EXPEDITION. .

--'-_.-----'., ..rB )TJ'rFAGE;…

■'AIRS IN SOUTH :-Y\IV0A-

[No title]

FROM GAOL TO LUXURY. 1.

WEATHER REPORTS.

-----IN AMERICA . !COUNT OF…

,terrible OUTRAGE IN "IRELAND.

THE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS.