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\1, WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE.--

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\1, WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE. MEETING IN CARDIFF. > K SIKI-E. J. 11EED, M.P., ON THE AGITATION. Under the auspices of the Bristol and West" of England Society for Women's Suffrage, a meet- ing, to "consider means for promoting interest in Cardiff in extension of the Parliamentary franchise to wo?iien householders and ratepayers," was held ou Friday afternoon in the? Crown Court of the Town-halt, Cardiff. Miss Gertrude Jenner, of Wellv presided. The attendance was limited, the meeting being considered of a preliminary character. Miss JENNER, in the eourse of her opening re- marks, said that it would appear superfluous for her to attempt to explain what had brought them together. She would, therefore, at once state that this was a preliminary meeting.to advise as to the best means of interesting others in the question of women's suffrage, and of taking steps to hold a public meeting at Cardiff a few weeks hence. The meeting partook more of tha nature of a con- versazione, or a drawing-room meeting, occupying the chair as she did, upon one of the burning questions of the day in this important and rapidly growing town. They were not met to discuss an illegal matter, or to suggest for woman what was likely to mar her influence or injure her reputation, but just the contrary. Every-day life proved to many of them that widows and spinsters who contributed to the rates and taxes of oar country were too often victims of tyranny and oppression, and they (the advocates of women's suffrage) were simply anxious to secure any pro. tection they could, believing that women would make as good a use of their votes as men did. (Ap- plause.) There could be no doubt but that women were sometimes the victims of tyranny, but herein Cardiff she was glad to see that we had a gentleman as a stipendiary magistrate who had only to hear of an unprotected woman being wronged to punish the person convicted of that wrong in a very grave and a very severe manner. (Applause.) They had met, she main- tained, as loyal and patriotic subjects, and she could not refrain from uttering (as a loyal and patriotic subject) a word of deep regret that any member or members of the Woman's Suffrage Society should have countenanced in London or elsewhere the principles laid down by the Irish National Land League, as was only too evident by a leading London journal she had in her hand. She yielded to no one in feeliugs of true sympathy with the distressed Irish, but two wrongs never made one right, and it was the highest wisdom of all who knew themselves to be oppressed and wronged carefully to avoid breaking the law themselves. (Applause.) Now Cardiff was a great centre of the Irish population—amongst whom she was continually working, and from whom she always received the greatest courtesy, aud she and others wished it to go forth as a pro- test against the society being blamed for individual mistakes of so formidable a nature. (Applause.) Miss liELES BLACKBURN, hon. secretary of the society, under whose auspices the meeting was held, next addressed the meeting. She stated that she had received a letter, written at Lady Reed's dictation, in which, while explaining that illness prevented her writing, she wished all success to their efforts. (Applause.) Sir Edward Reed, Miss Blackhurn proceeded, had always voted for women's suffrage. (Applause.) That was a prin- ciple which they all accepted as the right thing. Indeed, women's suffrage was a niece of such clear and simple justice, that* one wondered why it had not been immediately adopted. But every great principle had so many ramifications which it might affect, that people began to speculate upon all manner of possible evils, instead of looking at the manifest plaiu and direct good which might result. (Applause.) It was 14 years siuce the society, whose claims they advocated, was formed, and iu that pedod there had been a wonderful growth of public opinion. For the last 10 years a measure intended to give the Parliamentary franchise to women had been nearly every year brought before Parliament. (Applause.) Women were taking a \ast interest in the movement now-a-days; they had met in thousands in other large towns: and she had no doubt but that there must be a multitude of women in Cardiff who took an in. terest in it, although here the feeling was more latent, because no actual committee had been at work. (Hear, hear.) They were most anxious to make great progress during this session. Their late leader in Parliament, Mr Courtney, having taken office, had been obliged to give up the Conducting of the Women's Suffrage measure, which had been taken up by Mr Hugh Mason, M,P. for Ashton-under-Lyne and they wanted that gentleman to be supported with the whole force they could bring to bear. (Applause.) During the life of the present Parliament there would be, she thought; in all probability a Reform Bill, and that was the time they hoped their question (that of Women's Suffrage) would be considered. Her experience in Wales had shown her that the Welsh people were very Liberal in this matter. (Applause.) But it was not a party question at all; it appealed to all cldsses of society, as was proved by the fact that they had amongst their supporters persons of all sects and classes. That was one of their greatest powers. All they required waa that they should bind themselves sufficiently together to get their desire carried out. (Applause.) Miss Blackburn went on to urge that amongst the upholders of Women's suffrage they found the most industrious women, they found the women who used their brains, women working for all kinds of objects, school teachers, and women working in the temperance cause. Opposed to these were the idle women, who, finding themselves well cared for, do not think at all. Those women who knew anything of tile uatbic út itro were uu 1t11 sicis uC Wuiueu1, Suffrage. The men whoiiupported them were the generous and the unselfish amongst men. The men who did not sympathise with them wgte, some of them, very good men', who do" "not realise that the laws were not so good as they them- selves would'enact—they were a läw unto them selves; but others were opposed to women's suffrage—she hoped they were in the minority— because they like to feel that women were in their power. (Hear. hear.) She did not think that women should be longer denied the power which the franchise gave, a power which thoughtful, earnest, and industrious women wanted. (Ap- plause.) In giving an instance of the difficulties under which women laboured, she pointed to the fact that, although it was quite legal for a woman to be a guardian of the poor, it was very rare indeed for them to findà woman in that capacity, which arose from the, prejudice against women doing anything that involved responsible power. And so pauperism increased. (Applause.) Cus- tom ruled us, and the law of the land, which excluded women from political power, created and intensified the feeling that wemen should have no. thing to do with political matters. She pointed out how there was hardly an Act of Parliament which did not affect women as much a? men, and con- cluded by urging that immediate steps should be taken in Cardiff for the furtheranca of the movement. She resumed her seat amid applause. Miss JENNER said she had received a letter from Sir E. J. Reed, M.P., which she would read to the meeting. Sir E. J. Reed wrote as followsDear Madam, —I believe it is well understood that I am adverse to the present exclusion of women from the Parliamentary vote,and am desirous,that^under suitable conditions, the "right to vote should be given them. For this reason I sympathise with you in the meeting which you contemplate for the 25th, but it is quite impossible for me to leave the work of Parliament for the purpose of attending the meeting in question. Indeed, the time seems to be approach- ing, if it be not already arrived, when those upon whom is laid the heavy burden of Parliamentary attendance, will be thereby unfitted for any other engagement whatever at least during the Parlia- mentary Session. With regard to the funds, I trust the local interest in the cause will be ample for the purpose.—Youri very truly, E. J. REED. Mrs H. CORY moved, and it was seconded, that a public meeting should be held in Cardiff in order to extend a knowledge and interest iu the ques- tion of women's suffrage. The motion was agreed to, Some conversation ensued, in the course of which Miss Blackburn expressed a regret that they had not been able to hold their meeting in the grand jury room, wMch would have been very much more convenient for their purpose. On the motion of Miss JENNER, seconded by Miss COLBT, of Clifton, it was agreed that the meeting should not be confined exclusively to women. A petition," praying that the suffrage should be granted to women, was unanimously adopted. Votes.of thanks to the Mayor for the use of the hall, and to Miss Blackburn for her attendance, terminated thejproceedings.

BRITON FERRY.

SWANSEA.

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