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THE PEMBROKESHIRE ELECTION…

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THE PEMBROKESHIRE ELECTION AND ITS FUTURE. Sues another victory will be a defeat." Well might the banded aristocracy and squirearchy of Pembrokeshire admit this and most significant of this coming event which has cast its shadow ( before it was the imprudent and querulous Jere- miad of Mr MEYRICK at the Tory meeting in the Castle Square at Haverfordwest on Tuesday ifternoon. The ex-Tory member for the Pem- broke boroughs could net, he said, feel exultant it such a bare victory he saw nothing to boast of when" a little paltry country attorney" —as Mr THOMAS MEYRICK presumed to designate Mr WILLIAM DAVIES—could make such an almost successful head against the long unchallenged supremacy of the Tory squirearchy;—headed, as it is, by the Cawdor power, and aided by numer- ous deserters from the old Blue" or Liberal partv of the county, and with the apostate Picton influence as their powerful ally. It was not much of a victory after all," exclaimed Mr MEYRICK, and we heartily endorse the confession while feeling, nevertheless, that Mr MEYRICK deserves, and will receive; the rebuka of every honest heart, and of every lover of honourable fair play,for the offensiveness of his style and manner in referring to the Lib3ral can- didate. Mr THOMAS MEYRICK, of Bush, ex- member for the Pembroke Boroughs, and, in his own longings, expectant member for Pembroke- shire, is the grandson of his grandfather. As the son of the daughter of one of the "real Pembroke- shire MEYRICKS," he inherits the Meyrick pro- perty, and were it not for this lucky accident, to which his own merits, if he possess any, contri- buted nothing, he would have no claim or title to address a Tory meeting in Pembrokeshire and to treat with native discourtesy and coarse reviling a man like the Liberal candidate, so much his superior in every attribute of personal cha- racter, and almost his equal in the only qualification which secured Mr MEYRICK even a hearing at the Tory meeting—property. Mr MEYRICK would himself rejoice to lose by a much larger majority than that by which Mr DAVIES was defeated, if his ambitious yearnings had been only gratified by the Tory selection of himself as a candidate and he would not have hesitated to contest the county even upon Liberal principles if he had had any encouragement from the Liberal party, or had t. been assured of Liberal support. This is the gentleman—the mere accident of an accident- who was permitted at the Tory meeting to treat with insolence and low-bred coarseness the Liberal candidate, Mr DAVIES a man who by the force of manly character, by his sterling ex- cellency and worth, and by his indomitable energy and perseverance and pluck, has won for himself tn honoured name and high position in his native :ounty. To compare Mr THOMAS MEYRICK, who is only known because his grandfather was, with such a man as this,would be to insult ordinary intelligence. The pitiful and silly vanity of Pem- brokeshire Tory squiredom, the flunkeyism of blue blood" pretensions, was never exhibited before, so wretchedly contemptible. The defeat of the Liberal candidate-not much :0 exult over by the Tories, as Mr MEYRICK im- prudently confessed—is felt by Pembrokeshire Liberalism, as our special correspondent said in his yesterday's letter, to be a grand moral victory. To realize the real nature and character of the grave political struggle, of which only the first campaign was decided on Monday, it would be necessary to apprehend the local conditions under which that struggle was waged;—the master- ful might, and the hitherto unlimited supremacy of the Pembrokeshire Tory aristocracy and squirearchy; the deep and inveterate, and mentally and morally benumbing prejudices of a So-called gentry class "-more rife and rampant in Pembrokeshire than in any other Welsh county and the long political serfdom of so many of the farmers to their landlords and masters." Against a power so consolidated, and so widely ramified, imperious in the unchecked wantonness of irresponsible and hitherto almost unchallenged strength, and into whose.sacred order the little squireens of the county, and theso-callecl "gentlemen farmers," who have risen from the ranks, are constantly seeking admission, Mr DAVIES resolved to make head, and to raise the standard of political and religious freedom. But few of the Liberal or perhaps they would be more rightly designated the Whig—aristocracy of the county supported him; but those who did supported him warmly, headed by Lord KENSINGTON—now as ever faith- ful to the glorious Liberal traditions of his house and name. The struggle was said to be a hopeless one for Liberalism from the first, the Tory managers triumphantly affirming that Mr BOWEN would be returned by upwards of a thousand majority at the very least. When we remember the two or three fruitless political attempts which have been made during the present century to wrest the Pembrokeshire representation from Tory rule, the Tory confi- dence in an unprecedentedly large majority seemed to be abundantly justified. The late Earl CAW- DOR utterly failed to shake the Tory power in 1812, though aided by the utmost strength of the Picton influence; and now both of these lordly houses, having apostatised from their old political faith, are found on the same side, fighting against Liberalism. Colonel the Honourable ROBERT FCXKE GKEVIXLE failed to do so in 1831, and Sir HUGH OHEN in 1860-the only three political battles fought in the county within the present century. These three defeated candidates were all representatives of lordly houses," drawing descent from the very bluest of blue blood,' and their candidature did not arouse fierce class prejudices, or create bitter class hostility. But that Mr DAVIES, a man of the people, having no claims but personal ones-mental qualifications and moral worth-should dare to challenge the Tory power to the political fray, and beard the lion in his den, the Douglas in his hall," was more than Tory "blue blood," and especially Pembrokeshire Tory blue blood, could stand. The whole army of squiredom was aroused to bristling rage, and more than "a forty-parson power" of clergymen beat the drum ecclesiastic to summon the forces of Toryism to arms. The struggle was bitter and relentless on the part of the Tories, and the Liberal candidate was beaten. We accept the defeat, and do not refer to the means used by the Tory squires, or tothe cowardly desertion of Diftsenting and Liberal voters from the Tory candidate on the day of the poll. We accept the defeat i-fully and frankly accept it, as an earnest of coming victory. The sacred ground of Pembrokeshire Tory exclusiveness has been invaded by a man from the ranks the stronghold of Pembrokeshire Toryism has been struck with no weak hand, and is shaken to its foundations the close political pre- serve of Tory squires, as close as some ducal pocket borough, has been thrown open, and another Liberal invasion is certain whenever another opportunity is offered. This is the grand moral gain the Liberals have achieved- a sure earnest of future political gain. The Tory victory is but the gain of a loss the loss of moral prestige; the loss of political supremacy; the loss of hitherto unchecked and irresponsible power. The tenants who have been up now afraid to say that their souls, any more than their votes, were their own, have been taught to think no longer as serfs, but as free men and to defy, in the safety and protection of the Ballot, the landlor interest, by voting against it. Men who have dared to be free once will be less afraid, and will be anxious to exercise that freedom again. And time is on the Liberal side the forces that govern human progress are with Liberalism. The feeling of liberty amongst tenant f armers, and of confidence in the safety and secresy of the Ballot will grow and strengthen with every succeeding sun, and the next political battle, which Mr DAVIES has pledged himself to fight, will be fought under more favourable conditions, and with altered issues for Liberalism. We understand that the Liberals of, the county, as a token of their admiration of Mr DAVIES'S pluck and daring, and of their gratitude to him for his gallant attempt to rescue Pembrokeshire from its long night of political thraldom, have resolved to present him with a testimonial which shall be a lasting record of this stubborn and, for Liberalism, glorious political contest. The subscription list was promptly inaugurated, as we learn, on Tuesday afternoon, immediately after the declaration of the poll. This graceful public recognition of the political services of the Liberal candidate is appropriate and encouraging, and must be grateful to Mr DA VIES, as showing the unabated confidence and loyalty of his friends. The Chairman of the Liberal Committee—Mr JOSEPH MARYCHURCH- is the chairman of the Testimonial Committee, and the secretary, Mr SAMUEL THOMAS, of Haver- fordwest, is the treasurer of the testimonial fund. It is intended to present the testimonial to Mr DAVIES at a grand Liberal demonstration, to be held shortly in Haverfordwest.

RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT BEAUFORT.

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THE PAINTERS' STRIKE AT CARDIFF.

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nLFORD HAVEN, REGATTA.

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'UNERAL OF LORD SANDHURST.I

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INTERNATIONAL TRADE COURTESIES.!

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TWO CHILDRENJBURNT TO DEATH.

THE UNIVERSITY SPORTS. :

THE REDUCTION ORTHFNATIONAL…

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THURSDA Y, JUXE 29, 1876.…