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THE PROPOSED SALE OF ALL SAINTS'…

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THE PROPOSED SALE OF ALL SAINTS' CHURCH. To the Editor of the SOUTH WALES DAILY NEWS. £ »IR,—-1 hope in justice to the Welsh people of Cardiff that you will allow the following letter to appear in one of your next issues. I have got Mr. Noel's permission to publish it. It will show the public the intention of Lady Bute in reference to the Church of All Saints' (Welsh Church).—Yours &c., M. J. March 2nd, 1872. A LETTER BY THE REV, D. NOEL, FIRST CURATE OF THE WELSH CHURCH. Vicarage, Eglwysfach, Conway, Feb. 14, 1872. Dear Madam,—In reply to your letter just received 3,sking me if I have any account of the laying of the foun- dation. stone of the Welsh Church at Cardiff, I write to say that I much regret I have not; but I well remember some of the circumstances in connection with what was to Hie at the time a most happy event, and I think it was an event which gladdened the hearts of very many poor Welsh people at Cardiff then many of whom have, notwithstand- ing many discouraging circumstances, clung to the Welsh Church to this day, which, when you consider all things re- lating to this Church, is to me a matter of surprise. As you may suppose, I have always taken the most lively interest in the prosperity of the Welsh Church at Cardiff, not simply because I can say without boasting, that I was in God's hand the means of founding it; but also because I succeeded in gathering together into that Church a large number of people from all parts of (Jardiff,—people whose attachment to the Church and whose simple piety and readiness to advance the interests of the Church in every way, was far more fervent than I have seen since in any pa- rish I have been, and I think I am not saying more than what is true when I say that I believe they are to this day strongly attached to me personally, and there may be a peculiar reason for this, for you may not know that my going to Cardiff was quite an experimental movement, in- stituted, I believe, by the Bishop. It was thought that there were many Welsh people strongly attached to the Church then, but who had no means of worshipping in their own language, and the Bishop asked me if I would take the curacy, and see what could be done and on the first Sunday we met, in the National School-room, my congre- gation amounted to only eight, but in less than three months from that time the congregation had so increased that the room was crowded, and for this reason it was decided that a Welsh Church was much needed in Car- diff, and applications were made in different quarters for funds to build a church, and the Bishop himself, with his well known liberality, and almost the very first, promised 1:20 towards the object, and in a few months about £ 200 had been promised and collected. But just at this time Lady Bute began to take a lively interest in this new movement, and was very anxious to do something for the Welsh people in Cardiff. She sent for me by the late Mr. Priest Richards, to come to the Castle to talk the matter over, and I shall never forget her kindness of heart, when she spoke of her anxiety to do something for the Welsh people of Cardiff—when she said What can I do Mr. Noel?" Well, I said, all we want is a Church; we now are crowded in the schoolroom, and besides, ma.ny who love the Church, and who prefer the Welsh language, have an objection to attend in a school-room, which, besides being inconvenient to sit, is also not clean, where so many children meet all the week. "Quite so," she replied, "and very naturally too." "Well," she said again, I have been told that you have a good con- gregation, and for this reason I think it right that the Welsh people should have a church, and I will see what can be done." In about a week after this took place Mr. Leigh Morgan came to me and said that Lady Bute had made up her mind to build a Welsh church at her own cost, and that the money which had been collected should be applied to build a parsonage house." This was done the money was deposited in the bank for that pur- puse. In a short time after this the foundation stone was laid by the youthful Marquis, and there were present on the occasion Lady Bute, the Bishop and a large number of clergy. I well remember how delighted all were that they now had a prospect of having a church for themselves. I left Cardiff very soon after for Gellygaer, and I then lost sight of the people, but I have never from that day to this ceased re- gretting that I left Cardiff, and I am certain that an effi- cient Welsh preacher would have a fine congregation in the present church. I believe that the sole reason for the heartless proposal of selling the Welsh Church to Roman Catholics is the inefficiency of the present incumbent to officiate in the Welsh language. It was the fashion, when I was in Cardiff, to snub the poor Welsh, and they felt that they were neglected. I hope that, out of reverence to the memory of good and pious Lady Bute, this iniquitous proposal will yet not be consummated. I have been much pained even at the attempt to undo all my labours there. Excuse these hurried sheets, and believe me, yours very truly, NOEL, Mrs. Jenkins, Cardiff." Vicar of Eglwysfach.

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