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PONTYPRIDD. INQUEST.—On Tuesday an inquest was held on the body of John Willi ams, who died suddenly a few nights ago, at the Colliers' Arms, before Mr. Williams the deputy- ccron'.T;" and a jury A verdict of Death from natural cm?es was returned. AWFULLY S(JUDEX DEATH.—On Wednesday morning David Bowen landlord of the Tremayne Arms, Cwm- park, died very suddenly. In company with some friends he left, Cwmpark a-id Treorki for Pontypridd, where he arrived by the first train. While there deceased was Hitting down between two of his friends, when he was ob- served to lean back. He was found to be dead. The sud- denness of the painful event shocked every one. An in- quest will probably be held over the body to-day SCHOOL BOARD MEETING. -The usual monthly meeting was held at the Parish Vestry-room on Wednesday after- noon. Members present—Messrs. D. Davies (in the chair), T Edwards and Dr. Hunter. In the absence of letters expected from the Education Department, the business was confined to monetary matters. The finance report was read, and cheques for the several amounts were accordingly signed. PETTY SESSIONS.—The usual weekly sessions were held on Wednesday before Mr. E. Williams, and Major Lee. CHARGE OF ARSOX.-J ohn Davies, lately the occupier of a shop in Ta-ff-street, Pontypridd, was brought up in discharge of his recognizances, charged with attempting wilfully to set fire to his stock and premises. Mr. Morgan, of Cardiff, defended the prisoner, and Mr. Superintendent Matthews prosecuted on behalf of the owner of the house. The first witness called was Thomas Cork, fishmonger, who said that the prisoner left home early in the after- noon of Sunday, February 11th, leaving the children in his charge.—John IJoberts, grocer, living opposite the prisoner's house, stated that he was the first to discover the fire, to give the alarm, and render assistance. He broke open the door, and saw fire on the right side of the shop which was at once extinguished. He went up-stairs and found a portion of the flooring burning. He noticed that a board had been taken up, and in the space beneath there were some matches and some shavings partly ¡ burnt. Went back about a quarter of an hour afterwards and found some paper and the remnant of a candle. Was not sure whether Mr. Superintendent Matthews drew his attention to the fact first. Mr. Matthews also called his attention in the shop to some paper chips, and a candle end in a paper holder on the shelf where the first fire was discovered. There were matches and watch-boxes scattered amongst the toys. John Morgan, painter, corroborated the testimony of pre- vious witness. Thomas Gaze and Sergeant Thomas also gave corroborative evidence. Mr. Supt. Matthews pro- duced a quantity of chips, matches, and paper partially burnt, which he and Sergeant Thomas had found under the boards upstairs. He was of opinion that had the fire not been discovered in time, from the dryness of the wood and lathes, the premises would have been burnt down. A paper box containing the paper fold around the bottom of a wax candle acting as a socket, a paper of carbonised match boxes, toys, &c., was produced, taken from the shop. A quantity of open boxes, made of card-board, was found on one of the shelves also a package of matches opened. Some of the empty paper boxes were placed against the wall at an angle to the shelf on which the fire was, and leading to the upper shelf where the combustible matters above enumerated were scattered. There would be about ten to twelve inches between the shelves. Similar combustible mate- rials were found on the shelves to the right of the spot where the fire was. About eleven o'clock the same night prisoner came home and expressed his astonishment at the news communicated to him with reference to the fire. Witness told him he should take him into custody on suspicion of setting fire to his premises. Pri- soner offered no resistance, and said, "very well. Cross-examined If a fire had taken place in any other part of the shop some empty boxes would have been found on the shelves. Other witnesses were called. It was stated that prisoner had insured his stock and furni- ture for £300.1vlr. D. Evans had valued them at £32, and sold them for elf) 19s. Mr. Price, insurance agent, who insured the stock for J6300. said it Was his custom to take a ruan's word that he had' goods to the amount of the policy, instead of making personal inquiry whether the insured actually had the amount of stock required to be insured. The charge having been read to the prisoner, he pleaded not guilty. The prisoner's advocate urged that there was not sufficient evidence to insure a convic- tion before a jury, and called for his client's acquittal Martha Gibbon, servant to prisoner, who saw no indications of incendiarism on the Sunday the fire was observed. The Bench committed the prisoner for trial.

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