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CARDIFF A MILITARY DEPOT.

T THE TICHBORNE CASE.

S SWANSEA.

[No title]

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. It

GENERAL INTELLIGENCE. ---

------eHOUSE OF LORDS.-MONDAY.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.-MoNDAY.

CARDIFF.

MAESTEG.'

MOUNTAIN ASH.

NEWPORT.

MERTHYR. '--

HAVERFORDWEST. '*"

LLANTRISANT.

LLANDAFF. "V-

CHARGE OF MURDER.

THE SEWAGE QUESTION AT LEEDS.

TWENTY-FIVE LIVES LOST.

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THE EDUCATION QUESTION IN…

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pense the buildings had been erected, to School Boards for nothing. The rev. gentleman further observed :— When the Irish Church was disestablished, Mr. Gladstone took great care of all the vested interests of Churchmen. They were allowed the full value of their property. But Mr. Gladstone was dealing otherwise with Dissenters, who had made great sacrifices of tens of thousands, in money and money's worth, in the erection of school buildings but who were coolly told that they might get the buildings off their hands for nothing Dissenters bad reason to expect differently from the words of the 23rd section of the Act, which says that the School Board may arrange the under- taking to discharge any debt charged on the school not exceeding the value of the interest in the school-house.' But Mr. Forster seems to have full power to make his Act to mean what he pleases, for in the minute passed by the department on the 17th July, 1872, he says: 'no payment of rent beyond that charged upon or reserved out of the premises by the original lease, and no other valuable consideration, except an undertaking to keep the premises in repairs,' &c. Explaining this. the secretary of the department (Mr. P. Cumin), says, I the managers have power to transfer their school only in order to relieve themselves from the responsibility of maintaining it. and for no other purpose. It was not the purpose of the legislature to enable trustees or managers to obtain money for property held by them in trust, or for the discharge of debts for which they have made themselves personally responsible. The consideration for the transfer must be nominal.' The encumbrance of mortgage being an exception will not apply to British Schools in general. Possibly that was known when the exception was made, and such an encumbrance might suit school buildings of another description. It is quite clear that the Department undertakes to explain the law and to put it in force as it thinks fit. It makes regulations or minutes, which have all the force of lav/, without being discussed in Parliament. School Boards are the serfs of the Education Department. Sir John Paldngton, chairman of the Parliamentary Education Com- mittee, which sat in 186G, drew up a draft report of the evidence given before that Com- mittee. In that draft report, published in a Blue Book °f that year, he says, The members of the Education Committee (or Department) who are not connected with the office are at the head of other important Depart- ments. Lord Granville says that the Committee of Council (the Education Department) ve absolutely, no responsibility. Mr. Lingen, late secretary, says that nine-tenths of the business is conducted by the vice- president (now Mr. Forster). He feels a difficulty in deciding whether the vice-president is a respon- sible minister or not. Many such remarks are found in the report of Sir John Pakington, showing that the business of carrying out Mr. Forster's Act, has been entrusted to an arbitary, almost irresponsible de- partment, as Mr. Torrens said in the Contemporary lteview, a bureaucracy." The School Board at Pembroke Dock is also very actively engaged in discussing the questions connected with the movement, and at Merthyr there is some Prospect of a difficulty arising between the Guardians and the School Board. Indeed, in every part of the eountry, the agitation is going on, and as the opinion of Parliament will be to some extent ascer- tained during the progress of the Scotch Education Act, and the pulse of the members felt by Mr. DIXON and his friends, we have no doubt respecting the wis- dom of the plans which will eventually be adopted as the basis of operation in the forthcoming campaign. Already Mr. FORSTER has indicated the course the Government will pursue, by announcing last night in the House, his intention to move an amendment to the motion of the hon. member for Birmingham, upon the Plea that the Act has not been in operation sufficiently long to test its efficacy. The time for action is, there- fore, at hand, and, as we urged on Thursday last, Petitions in support of Mr. DIXON should be forthwith Prepared for signature. The occasion for talking is gone, people are thoroughly informed on the point, and the hour for practical work is at hand.