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THE HUMBERTS' CAPTURE

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CARDIFF POLICE ASSAULTED.

BAROMETRICAL INDICATIONS.

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THE LONDON PRESS

A PERFECT TREASURE.

CHRISTMAS CLUBS.

BRIGANDS IN MACEDONIA.

HENLEY REGATTA DEPRIVED

EARL ROSSLYN VICTIMISED

FOUL OUTRAGE IN THE MIDLANDS.

!PENNIES WANTED

GAS EXPLOSION.

DEAN OF WINCHESTER

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FOOTBALL LAYS AND LYRICS.

TO FOOTBALLERS

STRAY DOGS.

AFTER SOUTH AFRICAN SERVICE.

ANOTHER "KENSrr" PROTEST.

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CARDIFF TRAMWAYS.

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ATLANTIC GALES.

BRITISH NAVY.

SIR CHARLES HARTOPP.

FOOTBALL.

.SHIPPING CASUALTIES FOR LAST…

THE COALFIELD OF WESTGLAMORGAN

[MAID OF CEFN YDFA.

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[MAID OF CEFN YDFA. Story of Great Domestic Interest. INTERVIEW WITH MR JOSEPH BENNETT. Mr. Joseph Bennett, the well-known dramatic critic of the Daily Telegraph," and the librettist of "The Maid of Cefn Ydfa," visited Cardiff on Saturday and witnessed the per- formance of Dr. Joseph Parry's opera at the Grand Theatre. Subsequently Mr. Bennett was interviewed by a. "Western Mail" reporter. "What do you think of the romance as a subject for an opera?" was the first query put by the reporter? I "Well. I can praise the story very highly." was the reply. "It is a etory of great domestic interest; it is what we call a domestic opera as distinguished from historical or national. The situations and the whole circumstances of the opera appeal very strongly. I think, to human nature. At the same time, I think that it is an opera intended primarily for Wales. Dr. Parry has introduced many Welsh airs. and introduced them very deftly and very properly." "What do you think are the prospects of the opera?" "It is difficult to say, as one works more or less in the dark. You never know when the public are appreciative, and you never know what will be the end of a. work, however good it may be, but I should say that, with proper revision, the work will have a really good chance. Of course, it needB to be very much better staged than the means available here will allow. For instance, that storm scene, where the lawyer threatens 'Will Hopkin' with a pistol, that should be very strong, and would be very strong if it were properly staged. But it was very badly staged at Cardiff; the scenery was old and not appropriate, and the whole stage set was adapted to injure the scene rather than to Improve it. The 'storm' was ridiculous, for there was no thunder and no lightning—unless the flashing of something or other once or twice was intended for lightning. The oak should have been an independent tree, old and venerable in appearance and standing well out, not painted in the back scene, and the lightning should have struck the tree, under which 'Maddock' should have been. That explains his remark, 'Great Heavens, what an escape! What an escape from swift and dreadful death!' As it was the remark was meaningless, because one could not see that he had been in any dan- ger. He was in no more danger than 'Will Hopkin, for they were both near the tree. The lightning should have been seen to fall on the tree, and 'Maddock' should have been at the root of it, so to speak, and therefore in imminent danger." Now with regard to the music. Mr. Ben- nett?" Well, a good deal of the music I liked last night. Dr. Parry is especially fortunate in his melodies, and some of the orchestral work is very clever and appropriate—especially the piece played after the eisteddfod scene, and while the stage was darkening for the duet of the lovers. There were some places where I should make a change. For instance, at the close of the duet, where 'Kate' and 'Mad- dock' and 'Mrs. Thomas' come in. It ends with a quartette, and that would bear lengthening. It is effective, but it is very short. It would prove a more impressive finale if 50 bars or more were added. The whole of the first act is very good, and I don't think that requires alteration in any way. Nor should I revise the final scene—the death scene. It seems to me to be excellent. With a few touches here and there, I believe it would go very well with the public. Unfortunately. I could not attend any rehearsals, as it is rather a busy season with me just before Christmas. At the same time, having to work on his own ideas, I think Mr. Manners succeeded admir- ably." "It would be rather interesting to the public to know from what sources you received the information?" I "The facts, as they were enacted in real life, were given to me by Dr. Parry, and then Mr. Tom Stephens sent me a book written by a man who is still alive, and who lives at the village of Llangynwyd. He is a school- master and a parish clerk, I think. The book does not deal exclusively with the story, but the story- comes in in the course of the gossip about Glamorganshire which the book contains. The eisteddfod scene was my own invention. so, also, was the scene in the wood, and that scene, by the way. did not occur to me until I visited the place in company with Dr. Parry and the members of the Parry Company. At the bottom of a steep hill close to the house is a ravine, and I saw the possibility at once of getting the two rivals to meet there, and also to using one of the trees as a kind of rustic post-office in the old lovers' style. The first act—that of the harvest home—contains a good many details that I invented, but it is founded on the fact that 'Will Hopkin' used to meet 'Ann Thomas' in the kitchen of the farm. and that he was ordered away by the mother. The idea of humiliating 'Will' by getting a better singer to come to the eistedd- fod at Coity Castle was also my own. I saw a good opportunity of representing one of these national gatherings. In laying out the opera. I tried to introduce a large num- ber of songs and lyrics, as being adapted not only to Dr. Parry's genius as a melodist, but which would appeal to the Welsh public. In Wales the opera is very little known, and, therefore, the simple and much modified form is more likely to be useful." Mr. Bennett wished it to be mentioned that he did not decline to go on to the stage at the Grand Theatre out of any disrespect to the public, but because he had not felt well of late, and he was rather afraid that the strain upon his nerves would have an ill effect. He felt very grateful, however, for the call the audience gave him. On Saturday night, after the performance, Mr. Bennett was presented by Mr. W. W. Jones, acting on behalf of the Parry committee, with a travelling bag and case in recognition of his generosity in not requiring any remunera- tion for writing the libretto.

ALLERTON-STREET QUARREL.

THE LATT SIR EDWARD HILL,

THE PR!MAT £ S ILLNESS

PRESIDENCYOFTHE HAYTI REPUBLIC

LORD HAWKE'S TEAM IN NEW ZEALAND.

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