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ENGLAND v. WALES.

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ENGLAND v. WALES. Vivyan Injured. JARRIED OFF THE FIELD. BUT RESUMES PLAY TEN MINUTES LATER. Bancroft Scores Easily. First Goal at Three p.m. — [BY "WELSH ATHLETE."] From a climatic point of view the condi- tions that prevailed at Cardiff on Saturday morning could not have been better. For the last five or six days there has been a keen white frost in the Welsh metropolis, but this only served to dry up the Cardiff Arms Park, which had been put in a very soft and slushy condition owing to the continuous rains that had fallen for nearly a week previous to the frost. On Friday the frost was so keen as to cause some slight trepidation as to the match being played, for it was feared that the ground might prove a mile- too hard. There was some suspicion of that sort up to Friday; indeed, so late as Satur- day morning, when Mr. Whalley, of the English Rugby Union Committee, Mr. Schwarz, who captains the English team to- day, and a couple of others of the English players, were on the ground at an early hour. Just under the stand the ground was certainly a trifle hard, for the sun had not got on to it. and in addition it wae short of herbage. Beyond the grand stand, where the sun had touched the ground, and where the herbage was greater, the turf was very much softer-in a perfect con- dition, in fact. Overhead there was just a dull haze, but beyond this it wa-s a blue sky, ind an ideal sharp winter's day-excellent weather for football. These facts, no doubt, had a great deal to do with the attendance, ind many who would otherwise no loubt have stayed at home had the weather been at all threatening, turned out because of the auspicious meteorological conditions. The "Hills" contributed their usual large quota to he attendance, but, then, we always expect that from the Rhondda; for up there, be they colliers or whatever they are, they are essen- tially good sportsmen, and, after all, a sports- man of their type is a good thing to see and Phake hands with. In the early morning they K-mmenced to fill the streets of Cardiff, and one had a pretty good idea of what the attendance would be like even before ten o'clock. Just after noon the gates were open, and the crowd commenced to roll in the big stand on the far side, which has -been made double its previous size, was pretty full at an ea-rly hour. There would sure to be 5,030 on it a good hour before the game started. Then the little niches and gaps commenced to fill up, and half an hour before the match the stand on the far side of the field-opr)osite the grand stand, that is— was packed with an eager, anticipating crowd, which seemed to sway and throb with excitement. There were the usual little inter- national excitements, and the fact of a gentle- man of the cloth—that looked auspiciously like the Rev. J. Longdon—ran across the field ii; cited quite an outburst of applause from the multitude. "HEN WLAD FY NHADAU." pnd other Welsh airs occupied their attention at intervals. They were a. real good-tempered ciowd, too, with just that bit of latent passion in them that would not seethe and bubble until the match was fairly started. So far as the doings of the officials on each side were concerned during the early morning, there was hot tun;, of importance to record except that the news) came at the last moment that Phillips, of Newport, who is certainly the best defensive half-back that Wales has to-day. found that his strained knee would not permit of his turning out. There has been a dout"t about it all the week—ever since his injury, in fact. Phillips left the matter, I understand, entirely in the hands of the committee this morning, although I am told that. it was at his own suggestion that Jones took his place. Phillips did no6 feel Quite fit, and honour must be given to each a sportsman, who, knowing there must be some slight risk to his country, decided to ei-orifice his personal desires in order that the Welsh side should not suffer by any euspicion of breaking down on his part. The usual RECOGNITION OF NOTA- BILITIES occurred as prominent footballers or officials came on the field. A. J. Gould was. perhaps, the first to receive acknowledgments at the hands of the crowd. True, the acknowledg- ( ment was not what one might consider due to so g rious v, liero of the PaRt; still, it was hearty enough and thoroughly well-meant. Norman Biggs was a trifle more enthusiasti- cally received, for he had the double attrac- tion in the eyes of the crowd of being an old valued player, and of being a returned wearer of the khaki—with the ecars of war upon him. He looked well with it all, too, and grinned his approval, al'beit in the shame-faced eort of manner, at the applause that greeted him But. then, Norman was ever modest in acoe'wting those honours that are un- doubtedly due oo him, and I think he would alwavs raitlier run ten miles than be called upon to make a speech or eVeri allow someone else to make one if he Gor- man) was the suibjeot. Something like five minutes before the advertised time the teams came on to the ground, and their appearance wa,s heralded by a big cheer. Before they came into the enclosure a number of notabilities. including Messrs. Rowland Hill, Whalley, and other members of the Union made their way along the touch-line to their seats, whilst Mr. Adam Turnbull the referee fallowed them. Strangely enough, Mr Turnbull was followed by a referee who we consider a tleast the best m Wes Mr. Harry Bowen, of Llanelly. to wit. Profevbly he and Mr. Turnbull are the two best referees in ihe country at the present time. NUMBER PRESENT. Exactly at a quarter to three, the tune adver- tised for the kick-off, there would be at leaf, 35,000 people present on the ground. And j u the accommodation was not. strained. TEAMS ENTER THE FIELD. Sharp to the minute the English team, led by Taylor, who was ca-ptain of his side, came on to the field to the tune of "Rule, Britannia. Thev were given a fine .reception. Bancrott, ok. he head of liis men, followed to the strains of the "-Men of Harlech." Position of Teams.

Points of the Game.

- PHILLIPS NOT PLAYING.

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