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FOR BOYS/AND GIRLS.

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FOR BOYS/AND GIRLS. Granny's Companion. BY MADGE S. SMITH. Granny's companion lived in the window, in the dingy little living-room at Uncle Henry's. Granny and Uncle Henry and Aunt Kate, and Aunt Jane, and Aunt Kate's boy, Joe, and httle orphan Sally, all lived there, too so you may guess there was none too much •oom. Sally admiredtliecompanion very much. ft had pretty white, shining flowers ali over lt, in graceful clusters, that almost covered the common red pot. It should have been called a Campanula by rights, Uncle Henry said, and be should have known, for he was a gardener by trade. It was a very good companion for Granny in the long, dull days, when Aunt Kate was busy and cross, and Aunt Jane was out at the mill, &nd Uncle Henry was at his work, and Joe and little Sally were at school. Granny liked to look at the companion, and it, and pick the dead leaves off it. And when she got so weak that she could only lie Quite still, and look up at the smoky ceiling, the said she could hear the pretty bells of the hajf-opencd flowers ringing little tunes in her e&i s. Hut this, as Aunt Kate said, was non- Sense as even if there had been any noise, there wasn't, she was much too deaf to hear it. I couldn't like to have it neglected when gone," Granny whispered one day in her "weak, old voice. The idea," laughed Aunt Kate you'rev iot gone yet, by a long chalk h No such luck said Joe, who was a wit. Little Sally laid her soft cheek Against Gran- ny's grey wrinkled one, and whispered back, Yes, Granny, J will take care of the dear Companion." There's my little lass said Granny. "It's all I've get to leave, and I leave it to you, if promise to look after it regular. When it's done flowering, you must break off the old Pot and set it afresh in a bigger one, Uncle Benry'll get you one. As soon as the flowers ire over, mind And you must break the pot S3 the outside, and loose the soil from the foots." Yes, Granny," said little Sally but the others said The idea and Isn't she a caution." That night poor Granny died, and the com- panion was left alone. Sally cried a great deal, but everybody else was too busy to cry. There Was so much talking and eating and dress- making to do and Aunt Kate was very busy getting all the inside out of Granny's mattress, to look for something that wasn't there. She Said it would be a poor burying, and she won- dered Granny had put nothing by against it." When they had all gone off to the burying, Sally watered the companion, and talked to it. Poor companion," she said, you will miss dear Granny very much. I wonder if you mind being only a little girl's companion ? I will be Very careful of you. and do just what she said about changing the pot and watering you every day. And perhaps, some time, I sllftll hear the bells ringing, like Granny did. Aunt Kate said that Sally r was welcome to fifty companions if she wanted the stupid thing but Uncle Henry, who was a gardener, Said nothing and Sally felt ^frightened. When she came in to her tea the companion was gone. Oh cried Sally, what have you done with Granny's companion ? Uncle Henry has taken it away Never you mind said Uncle Henry, little girls shouldn't want to know such a tot." But Granny gave it to me," faltered Sally, M it was mine." Well, it's not yours now," said Uncle Henry, I've sold it to a gentleman, where 1m working. There's a penny for you, and &hut up." But it was mine," said Sally, weeping. I loved it." Next day was Saturday, when there was no tchoo). Sally slipped out quietly, when Uncle Henry went to his work, aAid followed him into a big gate. Fortunately he did not notice the little figure behind him, and Sally was soon standing, tremn ing and white-faced, staring up at the ..¡Z, nJ¡.nUJ butler. Please, sir, I m come to see Granny's com- panion, if don tmind," said Sally, for she, thought this fine person must be the master of the house. The big butler was so puzzled at this speech that he called the housekeeper, and she was so interested that she said she would tell the missis," which led to poor Sally being con- ducted through endless passages into a pretty, rosy-coloured room. At first the room seemed empty then she saw a lady lying on a couch in the low win- dow. She had soft, golden hair, and a pale, Itind face and Sally's eyes would have been happy enough to linger there, had not some- thing just beyond caught her attention. The companion There it was in the window, all its flower faces beautifully radiant. Oh, you dear companion cried Sally. I ve come to say good-bye to you, dear thing. You look very happy and well, com- panion." Was it your plant, little girl ?" asked the lady, come here, and tell me about it." So Sally stood shyly in front of the pale lady, and told her all the story of poor Granny and the companion. And, please, lady, will you let me pot the companion, when the flowers are dead—for you see I promised Granny before she died You shall pot it now, if you like," said the lady kindly; "for this flower-pot is cracked." For Uncle Henry had dumped the companion down with a crack, whn the lady did not give him as much as he asked for it. The kind lady had a nice big new flower-pot brought up and told Sally to take the com- panion out on the verandah, and pot it as Granny had showed her and Sally was very busy, for some time. The lady closed her eyes,, for her head ached but she soon opened them' to see Sally standing before her, wide-eyed, with her hands stretched out. Look, lady in the flower-pot I found them all round the broken pot. Ever so many 6ixp;nnics and shillings Such a lot of money Is it yours, lady or did it grow in the com- panion pot ?" But the lady said it must be poor Granny's Savings, and she had put it in that funny place, so that the one who loved her enough to do what she asked, would be sure to get them. And there was more money even than Sally thought, for when they rubbed off the dirt, there were several gold coins as well as silver ones. Then if they are mine," cried Sally, I can pay you for the dear companion, and buy it tyack. If there is enough money, ofc ourse Do you think it would be sorry, perhaps, to leave this pretty house and come back to being just my companion ? I think it wouldn't some- how for it was very happy with Granny, and she was very poor." But I am so lonely, Sally," said the lady what am I to do without any companion ?" Sally hesitated, with tears in her eyes. I wish you would both stay here with me, you and the companion." said the lady, wist- fully, then we could all be company to- gether. So Sally and the companion and the pretty lady fixed it all up together very nicely.

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