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f >1Vi'TM'firi IwVmI,.tutu"I.,…

-.--_.-._-TIMES OF HIGH WATClt…

The MONMOUTHSHIRE HOUNDS will…

USES AND MODES OF IMPKlSONM…

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USES AND MODES OF IMPKlSONM liNT. IT is one of the characteristic features of modern I society—and one which indicates a great improve- ment upon the general spirit of earlier times—that, amidst the various provisions which are made for the relief of human ills, even convicted criminals-- those who have offended against the rights and well- ies. being of society, and are suffering the punishment of such offences, are not excluded from conside- ration. The treatment of prisoners is undergoing a great change for the better, both as regards the wisdom and the kindness of the regulations to which they are subjected and large sums are being expended in the construction of prisons adapted for carrying out such objects. One of these new gaols is about to be erected in Birmingham, the first stone having been formally laid last week and in the | speech of the talented Recorder, Mr. M. D. Hill, [ on that occasion, there are some sentiments worthy 1 of notice. "They have found," he said, "by a f long experience, that that punishment is founded I on a vindicative feeling, which seeks only to vindi- I cate the offended majesty of society on a poor, erring, miserable creature, by producing misery to bis mind, and suffering to his body, and is, after his mind, and suffering to his body, and is, after all, but a weak and inefficient means of securing n society against a repetition of those offences which r, < had been the cause of that misery and suffering." 0 1 *< They designed to erect what might appropriately be called a moral hospital. They j sought to erect a building, and, as far as in them ay> so to conduct its arrangements, as to cure the unhappy persons who -where afflicted with those Cental and moral diseases which required the re,itedies that would there be administered." Fine Sentiments these. Without expecting too much in 'e way of reformation, it must be obvious that the n|aking-|c/ one great aim of imprisonment, instead 1 ° looking only to the infliction of punishment, is calculated, under a wise and judicious system, to f Co»fer much benefit upon society. We do not deny I iat when the laws of society are broken, the pri- mary business of those who execute those laws is ° vindicate their supremacy, and to protect the Community, by such punishment as may be deemed est; But in providing for the carrying out of that punishment, not only religion and humanity, but prud prudence, or, in other words, a regard for the wel- are of society, for the promotion of which, all laws r^hi °r to be, made, would suggest the desi- a leneness of attempting, concurrently, the refor- »' °ffender. Of the mode in which this so* 11 ^one» Mr. remarks :—" Man was a -r1 K kut' when collected in a little coramu- T'. by reason of his offences, that very social e wbich, in other circumstances, was the jl 7 lPn ant* promoter of all improvement and civili- on> became a poison; and each was made Ba°rse contact with his neighbour. It was neces- O > as a beginning in the work of reformation, to SeParate those who were thus brought together, so i. 1 each should not act for evil upon his neigh- ,t "our. Xliat prison would, therefore, be conducted t» what had been called the separate system but 0 audience must not for a moment confound that solitary confinement." The solitary system is n°w condemned by all humane men who are ac- ts tainted with its real working but the separate system appears to be calculated to do much good, though there is one point in the details which, we i. think, carries out the system too far, and that is the separation oi prisoners in the chapel, so as is prevent their seeing each other. At such a time, it appears to us restraint to that extent, might well £ removed providing, however, that prisoners de- y'i sirous of such seclusion,might have it. To return, i, however to the Recorder's address; the employ- er in en t of the prisoners is an importan t matter alluded •jj to. Another principle (said Mr. Hill) wh.ch $God had implanted in man was, that there could no healthy state of the human mind without employment. This had been provided tor, in the £ Arrangements of the prison. The prisoner s » habits of industry, if he had formed such would ■y] *»ot be destroyed by want of work. And it he had !■not formed such habits, they would there be sup- e plied, so that when he left the prison, he would have obtained a blessing \vhieh he never before ■#( possessed—the means of maintaining himself by honest industry," This is a matter of great importance. In the pri- nt. sons of the United States, as well as in some few 0 upon the continent, the employment of prisoners d has been carefully attended to, with very good re- !«1 9ults. In some of the former, indeed, the labour ot | ^e prisoners pays for the expenses of the estab- lishment; a system highly to be commended for ■' lts strict justice, as well as its economy. There was one remark of the learned Sergeant which lleeds some explanation. He said t is neces r; sary, for the well-being of the criminal himself, was one remark of the learned Sergeant which lleeds some explanation. He said t is neces r; sary, for the well-being of the criminal himself, i; that he should be retained under coercion till the l.ure was effected." This would seem to involve l>. 1 the idea of discretionary punishment which, as ap | Pears to us, could not be adopted without the I greatest danger of abuse and misciie he Chanfain of the Preston House of Correc- >, the Rev. John Clay, has also published a use- •- ful document with respect to those under h.s care. It is gratifying to perceive that in the northern ^"vision of Lancsahire, in which Preston is situated crime is on the decrease. The committals B' ln 1844 were 1549 in 1844 they were 1183, exhi- 7, bi«ng a decrease, in one year, of no fewer than e' 366, or more than one fourth. J he Chaplain, in T, .^ving these statistics, makes several observations y Lof general interest. Thus he remarks that while p' fhe number of young offenders in that local,,ty had h' So decreased as to be smaller than m 1830, the de- crease had not been so large amongst the girls as th^ boys. Tin, is an important circumstance, and one which calls for careful inquiry. the manufacturing districts, em 1- J,. )yed, earn much higher wages those of the males, than in the agr.cuUural part,. r,deed their wages often equal, and »ot iS'«ently absolutely exceed those of yo i~ ]sarne acre • and particularly those of operatives httDnd,'as for instance, the leavers and framework-knitters. Many a yo g Sirl, when trade is good, receives more than many u»an with a large family can earn. hey subject to any excess of want o enlP J t'Ueut jn Unfavouraqle times. In the manu ac ui g ]j;,stricts, too, there is much more emp o)nie' i3 females than in the agricultural. Still here is p >e fact, that though the number of criminals has decreased with the improvement in trade, the de- crease has not been so great among young female, ,)as- among young male offenders. It is to be re- gretted that the returns of all prisons are not equally i Detailed, and given in the like manner to the pub- t, i 1. '> 'T lie. In tile absence, however, of such data, we J are inclined to attribute the evil to two causes,—(he one the general and average want of an employ- ment for females (notwithstanding all that manu- facturers provide for them), and the other, the inferior education of the female sex. In referring, generally to the causes of crime, the worthy chaplain says :—" The head and front of the direct causes of moral disorder are now as it has been too long, drunkenness.' Men and wo- men are led into fuither crime by the previous crime of intoxication and children are exposed to every demoralizing influence by the neglect of their drunken parents and this opinion he confirms by a number of facts. How, then, is this prolific source of vice to be diminished ? In addition to the ordinary means of moral and religious culture, we must recommend, as we have done before, the promotion of suitable recreations, which may at- tract the people from pleasures of a grosser kind, and thus prepare them for these intellectual pur- suits, which can never be reached but by a transi- tion from the habits we condemn, and which, be- sides, it is foliy to hold up as the only occupations for wearied men, who must have amusement with- out effort, mingled with that which calls for mental exertion. With regard to prison discipline, the reverend gentleman attributes highly beneficial effects to two measures—the removal of the tread- wheel, and the individual separation of prisoners before trial. With regard to the latter, he says, that ot boys committed for the first time, who have had to mingle in a common yard with untried pri- soners of all kinds, 59 per cent have incurred, the penalty of transportation within two years; ivJiiht, of thirty-three hoys, who had been carefully keptjrolJl contamination, not one had relumed. Facts, like these, are valuable, and lead us to hope for the general prevalence of a better system of management in our prisons.

THE NEWPORT AND PILLGWENTLLY…

FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

[No title]

- CORONERS INQUEST. !

FRIVOLOUS AND VEXATIOUS CHARGE…

NI:A HI.

US K, ' ,. ,--

USK FAR M E R S' CLUB.

USK COURT LEET.

ABERGAVENNY.

CHEPSTOW.

MONMOUTH.

CA RDIFF.

To the Editor of tht Monmouthshire…

THE POTATOE DISEASE.

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

NEWPORT, ABERGAVENNY, AND…

[No title]

Family Notices