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,-TO CORRESPONDENTS.

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WEEKLY CALENDAR.

LIFE IN THE SLAVE STATES OF…

THE SPIRIT IN WHICH POLITICS…

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THE SPIRIT IN WHICH POLITICS SHOULD BE CULTIVATED. THE lively author of Six Thousand Miles Ram- ble through the United States," in his off-hand way, observes, it is the duty of every man in a free country to be a politician." Our object is to shew how this may be done, without breaking through that spirit of friendship which should ever characterise mutual intercourse. The fundamental cause of the ascerbities which prevail in political affairs, appears to us to be the non-recognition of mutual rights, or, in other words, "oliiical bigotry; which, in fact, is strictly analo- gous with bigotry in religious matters. There are minor causes, such as irritability of temper, the excitement of particular occasions, the misunderstandings which are apt to arise as to mat- ters of fact, personal differences among leading men, &c. but the cause we have stated, is, in our opinion, the chief. Let a man acknowledge, not merely in words, but heartily and sincerely, that another man has just the same right as he has to form an independent conviction, and to carry itout, and let him act in the spirit of that acknowledg- ment when he comes into contact with those who differ from him, and political bitterness will, to a very considerable degree, subside. What is it that Makes so many of our landowners and wealthy men unpopular in the estimation of their tenants ",and tradesmen, just in proportion as these tenants possess intelligence and self-respect but the as- sumptipn of the former to control the opinions and acts of the latter Remove the coercion, and the sense of oppression (which is incieasing, and ^vhich, as intelligence progresses, must increase,) will cease. The same argument, of course, applies to the relations of employer and woikman and, in short, to every other in which influence of any kind is possessed by one individual or class over another, and is sought to be exercised in opposition to-the free will of the weaker party. Nor is it in only these more formal manifestations that the spirit of political bigotry is to be observed. We are all liable to it, and apt to indulge it almost impercep- tibly to ourselves, when we are offended with another man because he does not think with us because he is impervious to our argument, we are guilty of indulging this unsuitable spirit. Another considerable cause of the bitterness, is the disposition, too common to all men, to impute improper motives to those who differ from them. Many who fully recognise the rights of others, nevertheless condemn them as acting from unsuit- able mptives. In too many cages, unfortunately, j such motives are too obvious, but they are frequently imputed without foundation. In very many cases, in which men are suspected of improper motives, it may be found on calm investigation, that they err rather from ignorance. Political information is so little diffused, that is, in a systematic form, that the great majority of those who take part in politics, necessarily act upon very imperfect know- ledge. As intelligence progresses, not only will political science be made prominent among the higher branches ol study, but on that wider scale, in which objections might arise as to the inculca- tion of particular theories—we mean in our schools generally—the facts upon which such theories, as well as the course to be taken on passing questions, must be based, will be regularly communicated. And in proportion as facts are known, the differ- ences existing in the community will greatly di- minish, and from that circumstance alone, a more friendly spirit will prevail. The course, therefore, which should be taken by every man who laments the prevalence of political animosity, is not to withdraw from politics altogether, as some wcll- meaning, but weakly-judging, individuals would, which is absurd nor to sacrifice principle, which is which is absurd-nor to sacrifice principle, which is wicked but to advocate his own principles in a candid and liberal manner, and to diffuse what he believes to be truth, among those around him. The firmest adherence to what the judgment approves is perfectly compatible with the most liberal spirit, to those who hold different views; and he is the best friend to truth—which is what all are, or ought to be seeking—who, without compromising his views of it, recognises really and practically in others, the same rights which he claims for himself.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

PRESENTATION OF PLATE.

ABEUGAVENNY.

MONMOUTH.

CHEPSTOW.

! CARDIFF.

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.p CORN AVERAGES,

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POLICE INTELLIGENCE.

MELANCHOLY OCCURRENCE AT HOUNSLOW…

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REMINISCENCES OF A SEXAGENARIAN.—1795—1805.…

IRELAND.

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OUR LETTER BOX.

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