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'1.I'O CORRBSWOSSBENTg.

'FT TIMES OF l-IIGH WATER…

b o . „ WEEKLY CALENDAR.

j TREATMENT OF THE POOR.

¡,RUSSIA AND CIRCASSIA.

LOCAL BTELLIftEm

SEAMEN-REFUSAL TO SERVE.

A.KBW55&. !

MON MOUTH.

CHEPSTOW.

CARDIFF.

GREAT EASTERN AND WESTERN…

Boucher Haees.

WELSH NORMAL SCHOOL.

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"THE HANOVER SIXGEIlS."

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[No title]

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ABERGAVENNY CYMREIGYDDION.

[No title]

[No title]

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To the Editor of the Monmouthshire Merlin. SIR, In connection with the subject upon which I addressed you last week, there is another point extremely essential to the prevention of railway accidents, and to which public attention should be drawn I mean, the establishment of an instantane- ous and intelligible system of communication between the driver of the engine and the guard. Upon this subject, much has been written, and many plans proposed but none of those I have read appear to be free from objections, on one account or other. The last and most feasible one I saw was to have a cord running along the roof of the carriages composing the train, and, passing from the guard to the engineer, to have a bell attached to it, that the guard, in cases of necessity could ring. To this plan there are, in my opinion, several objections the principal one of which is, that, admitting the bell to be rung, and that it excited the attention of the engineer, it would tend rather to confuse him than otherwise, because, leaving him in ignorance of the instructions the guard wished to con- vey to him, he would be at a loss to know whether the case required him to stop instantly, or merely to gradually slacken his speed. Allow me, therefore, sir, through the medium of your columns, to suggest a plan, to which, so far as I am able to judge, I think there is no objection. Instead of a cord I would have a wire, to traverse the line of carriages, (terminat- ing in a coil at either one end or the other, to allow for any increase in the length of the train), connected to a small voltaic battery, at the guard's end, and with a bell and index at the other, forming, in fact, an electrical telegraph, on a small scale. On this index, I would have a code of signals placed, implying "stop," "go on," "look out," &c., or any other requisite form of words embodying the usual expressions made use of between the guard and the driver By a simple arrange- n ent tiie same instant that put it in operatior, w .11 ring the bell and point out the directions the guard wished to give. 1 am not sufficiently au fait in chemical knowledge to enter into the detail of the arrangement, but I feel persuaded that it may be easily effected, and confident that it could not fail to answer the purpose intended. I leave the plan 1 propose to the consi- deration of your scientific and engineering readers; and you may probably hear from me again, upon a subject which is now engrossing the attention of all parties—high and low—rich and poor. I am, sir, your obedient servant, Near Walsall, Sept, 16,1845. AMYNTER.

ABERGAVENNY CYMREIGYDDION.

DREADFUL FIRE, WITH LOSS OF…

NEWPORT.

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