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'GRAND CONCERT.

PONTYPOOL.

~MONMOUTH.'

ABERGAVENNY.

CHEPSTOW.

TOWN-HALL, MONDAY, JFLY 14.

THURSDAY, JULY 17.

TOWN HALL, PONTYPOOL, TUESDAY,…

TOWN HALL, ABERGAVENNY, SATURDAY,…

TOWN HALL, CHEPSTOW, TUESDAY,…

[No title]

Glamorganshire Summer Assizes.…

CAMBRIDGE ELECTION.

[No title]

SHIPPING INTELLIGEXCE.

CORN AVERAGES,

TAFF VALE RAILWAY TRAFFIC,

PRICES OF SHARES AT BRISTOL.

HOUSE OF LORDS.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

PORTUGAL.

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PORTUGAL. We have accounts from Lisbon ito the 9th instant, which an- nounce a rare piece of intelligence. The Portuguese Government have at last shown som honesty in their engagements to putting down the slave trade. Official intelligence has been received from Benzuele that a successful effort had been made by the Portuguese navy, on the coast of Africa, by which three dif ferent slaving expeditions had been defeated at the same period two prizes made, and a third ship destroyed. The preparations throughout Poitugal for the elections were going on with great activity, and it was confidently anticipated by the Government that they would have a large majority. We hope it will be ob- tained ny honourable means. No decision had been come to by Ministers respecting the projected railways. The exchange on London was 54^. AMERICA. The only item of mnch interest in the American papers of the 1st inst. is the proclamation of the President Ansoa Jones of Texas announcing officially the proposition of Mexico to treat 11 1 anconditiomdly as to the independence of Texas, and ordering a cessation of hostiliiie in consequence. The publication of the proclamation created no little excite- ment in Texas. The particulars of the negotiation or treaty did not accompany it, but it was generally understood that the articles were few in number, and related only— I. To the recognition ot independence. 2. The refusal of Texas to be annexed to the United States, or an v other power. 3. The establishment of boundaries. 4. The providing of an arbitration in case of disagreement as to the boundary. The Commissioners appointed by America and Great Britain to run the boundary line between Caoady and the States are still busily engaeed in their labours. The funeral of General Jackson took place on the 24th June and on that day, throughout all the cities of the Union, funeral piocessions took place in honour of the deceased. NEW ZEALAND. CONFLICT BETWEEN THE BRITISH COLONISTS AND THE NATIVES. Auckland, New Zealand, March 28. Sir,—I deem it my duty to apprise you of the calamity which has befallen the oldest settlement, and perhaps the best harbour in New Zealand. The aborigines about the Bay of Islands have latterly been getting discontented, in consequence of the falling oil in trade, and considerable decrease in the number of ships visiting that port-a falling off which they cannot account for, except that, it be caused through the inter- ference of government. This notion having got possession of their minds, they have declared war against the British flag and a chief of the name oi'Heki, a ringleader, prior to the II th instant, had twice succeeded in cutting down the ntgstart, which was a third time ordered to be erected again by the go verninent, and thirty soldiers, accompanied by her Majesty s ship Hazard, of 18 guns, sent to protect it; these forces were assisted by the inhabitants, enrolled as special constables. The town was attacked by the natives at dayhght of the morn- ing of the II th instant, and 1 am sorry to inform you that the natives succeeded in driving the whole European population from the settlement, and compelling them to take refuge on board the shins in the harbour, making their escape with but little more than what they had on their backs. The town be- ing now entirely in the hands of the nat'ves, was p undened of everything, and property, amounting to as fallen into the hands of the savages. The loss of life on the part of the Europeans was not great-ten in number killed and fifteen wounded Amongst the latter is Captam Robertson, of her Majesty's ship Hazard, wbo is dangerously wounded, having four musket balls in his legs and arms. I his gallant officer, wWl about «,.„>• n,e„ back when he got severely wounded and fell. The fate of the day was just about this time decided against the Europeans by a body of natives, with Heki at their head havmg surprised and taken a musket-proof blockhouse, which stood close by the flaestaff The number of natives killed and wounded dur- ing the engagement has not been ascertained, but there must have been a considerable uumber of both. The Governor (Captain Fitzroy), anticipating native dis- turbances, wrote to Sydney for troops about two months ago, but, unfortunately, they did not arrive here until tSefiSrd-inst., by her Majesty's ship North Star. At present tikere is not a sufficient force in the colony to retake the settlement at the Bay, but I believe it is the intention of the government to blockade the port, so that, if tlut is the case, the many whale ships who were in the habit of visiting the Bay of Islands will now in all probability visit this port. It is impossible lor any one to say where or when these dis- turbances will end, that the New Zealenders have been greatly under-rated is now apparent. 1 he home government will now be undeceived that the peaceable possession of this colony c could be maintained by about 100 soldiers against a native po- pulation of 120,000. To maintain our position even in the towns, not less than a thousand regular troops can do so, and unless this force is sent, the colony is not worth living in. I am, sir, your obedient;.f;ervant, (Signed) LLOYD'S AGENT. To Wm. Dobson, Esq., Secretary to Lloyd's,

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

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