Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

4 articles on this Page

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

DOMESTIC NEWS.

News
Cite
Share

DOMESTIC NEWS. .Nsw SOUTH WALES—The Gazette of Tuesday announces that the Queen has been pleased to appoint Alfred Stephen, Esq., to be chief justice of the colony of New South Wales, in the room ot the late lamented Sir J. Dowling. Her Majesty has also been pleased to appoint William Montagu Manning, Esq., to be her Majesty's solicitor-general for the colony of New South Wales. Dr. Jenkyns, Master of Baliol College, Oxford, is to be the new Dean of Wells. It is stated that the Norwich Union Fire Insurance Office has this year paid £ 20,000 leas than last year for loss by incendiary fires. GAME.^—The Duke of Bedford has not quite discontinued the preservation of game, nor discharged the whole of his keepers, but has given his tenants leave to coutse down the hares on their farms, and has reduced the staff of keepers. The noble duke bas broken up his kennel of greyhounds, and has distributed them amongst his tenants. DEATH OF GEORGE STANSBURY.—Poor George Stansbury, the well-known musician and popular vocalist, died at his residence in Lambeth on Tuesday ae'nnight. Mr. Stansbury, a few months ago, betd an engagement at the Surrey Theatre, as musical con- ductor of the orchestra. He was superseded in the office by Mr. Loder, the present conductor. Mr. Stansbury was a native of Bristol, and was early educated in the musical art, in which he became proficient, if not eminent, as a composer, an instrumen- talist, and a vocalist. He had been conductor of the orchestra at the principal theatre in Dublin, was an admirable concert singer. and an able and auccessful teacher. He was alse the composer of some very pleasant melodies that still continue popular. Mr. Stansbury's age was 44. THE WORCESTER RAlLWAYI. TRIUMPH OF THE BROAD GAUGE.—The result of the parliamentary committee's delibera- tions on the Oxford, Worcester, and Wolverhampton, and Lon- don, Worcester, and South Staffordshire Railway schemes, arrived in this city shortly after nine o'clock on Wednesday even- ing-Iii hours after the decision had been pronounced. Imme- diately on the arrival of the news, the greatest excitement pre- vailed throughout all ranks—indeed we have not seen the "faithful city" so aroused from its wonted soberness by the ex- hibition of popular feeling for many years past. In a few mi- nates the streets were filled with anxious and enquiring faces, and before half-an-hour elapsed, nearly every peal of bells inthe city was, with clamorous tongue, enunciating congratulations on this welcome news, not did they cease their joyous peals until midnight.—Ibid. BURIAL OF DISSENTERS IN CHURCH-YARDS.—The followiM is 0,. Lasfaittgton's opinion on cases submitted to him by the xKv. T. S. Grimshawe, the Rector of Burton Latimer, and Baptist minister of the same place, as to the right of a dissenting mi sin*, ter to precede a corpse into the church-yard, give out a hyntalf the grave, and afterwards to offer up a prayer and deliver an address outside the church.yard; which it seems has been the practice in that parish, in the case of persons of the Baptist con- nexion dying unbaptized :—I am of opinion that the law recog- nizes no distinction as to the burial of Dissenters. Unless the person to be buried fails within the prohibition ef the Rubric, as unbaptized, the duty of the incumbent is to bury the corpse with the usual funeral service, without regard to whether the person when alive was a Dissenter or not. I think, when the friends of the deceased apply to the clergyman to abstain from performing the funeral aetvice, on the ground that the deceased when alive was a Dissenter, the clergyman may comply with such request but I am of opinion that the Dissenting minister cannot claim a right to precede a corpse to the grave in the church-yard, and sing a hymn over the remains, though he afterwards retires out- side the walls, and there offers up a prayer and delivers an address. 2nd. It is true that the freehold of the ohuich-yaid is generally, but not always, in the incumbent; but the law docs not rest particularly on that foundation. The principle is, that the ground is consecrated for divioe offices according to the rites of the Church ofEngtand, tjsed that the incumbent has the sole and exclusive right, as well as duty, of performing such offices. Even clergyman episcopally ordained could not perform any ceremony within the church-yard without the leave of the incum- bent nor evea then, except according to the form of the church. I have read the statement drawn by tbe Baptist minister; it does not alter my opinion—that opinion being, that no person save the incumbent, or other clergyman of the Church of England by his permission, can perform any description of funeral rite in the church, and only such a rite as the church sanctions." NEW BILL ON THE LAW OF DEBTOR AND CREDITOR. The new bill, founded on the report of the select committee appointed to inquire into the operations of the act of last session with re- spect to debta not exceeding £ 20, contains only four clauses. By the preamble, it is declared to be expedient and just to give cre- ditors a further remedy for the recovery of debts due to them. It is proposed, that if any person is indebted to any other in a sum not exceeding £20 besides costs of suit, for which sum any judg- ment shall have been obtained or any order for payment thereof from any court of competent jurisdiction, it shall be lawful for the creditor so obtaining a judgment or order to obtain a sum- "y Commissioner of Bankrupta for the district in ,'c^,u debtor shall reside, or shall have resided for one fr«o.D»nL 'he date of auch judgment or oider, or °f Court of Commissioners, or other mined as well •a0rb7c?id*to?l,b,S* J^ T f th* <Uht crw»itor, and an order made for payment of to eMe *d,bt" r ■am* or manartino JL P*r|y or "is transactions respecting the answer thereof to fh. deb,« or.8h*" not m,ka or shall appear to have b £ n r co™m,M,ooer8 or cou['- debt, or of having wilful^io "ricfed it .iJ '? Con,r,C.1;ng ,ha pect of being able to pay it or nf u Uh°Ut P'0*" ^,y with hi. property, i/ordw Jo if'V^ C0DC;ed or appear to have the means of p.viL th k °f ,f h" otherwise, and shall not pay the J* T6 bJ ,vast,I1me"t! or may be committed to tbe common gaol of ihY 1 be made for payment out of^s.?!" Z A° more than £ 50 a-year. No order of ^r' ° longer period than forty days. The power of th« AV»" f°i lioD (7 & 8 V Ict., ca p. 96) IS to el tend to all cu." 0' balaoces not exceeding £ 20. It is not requisite for a debtor or creditor to employ either counsel or attorney ,n m.k.ng applic.ons or tak- 1Dg ,ny proceedings under this Act. Should the measure p»s as it is framed, a creditor may summon a debtor, and if he resides in the city of London, and in the opinion of the Court of Bank- ruptcy comes within the category of offences mentioned, he mav be committed to Newgate for forty days or by a Court of Re- quests, if reaident in Middlesex, to the House of Correction The bill was presented by Lord Brougham. THE GAME LAWS.—The following is an abstract of Lord Dacre's bill for the further amendment of tbe laws in England relative to game. According thereto, no person is to sell game except a licensed dealer in game, &c.; but occupiers of land need not take out certificates. Dealers in game are to keep a book, entering the namea of sellers thereof, the description of game sold to them, &e.; and such book is to be open to inspec. tion at any time by justices of the peace, or persons having their warrant. Persons in possession of game are to account for it. and also for the possession of snarea. Damage done by game ia to be appottienedamong the neighbouring proprietors, the amount being assessed at petty sessions, power of appeal being given to quarter sessions. The provisions of the former act, as regards all penalties end forfeitures, are proposed to be extended to this act. A STALE TRICK.—A silly old man, a yeoman named Bowen. was victimised at our fair on Tuesday by an exceedingly stale trick. He was met by a swindler, who said that he waa anxious to purchase a certain horae, which was exhibited in the fair by a gentleman's servant, whom he pointed out. but that not being on good terms be could not effect a bargain he then promised the old man a sovereign for his trouble if he would purchase it foIP him. Bowen was asked £ 20 for the animal. but having only X14 (Which he had just received for a cow), he paid that money, and returned to his employer for the remainder. Both parties de- cemped-tbe horse is not worth 6d — Worcester Guardian. Sir Herbert Jenner Fust lately gave judgment, at like Court of Archers, against the Rev. John Jones, vicar of Haleaowen, sus- pending him from doing duty. and receiving any emoluments from the living for two years, in consequence of fornication at a biothel. HEARTLESS SKDUCHON AND ATTEMPTED Su.c.M.-At Lam- beth-street on Thursday week, Mws Mary Ann Salisbury, the daughter of a ditsenting ministei at Bath, was charged with at- tempting to commit suicide on the preceding night. Frederick re>, a servant in the employment of the London and West- minster Boat Company, deposed that on the preceding night be obaerved the prisoner on the steps leading to the company's pier, on the Surry side of the Westminster Bridge, and knowing that the boats had ceased to run for the night, lie asked bar who she was waiting for 1 She rephed," Nobody." There was some- thing about her manner which induced him to watch her cloaely, and perceiving that she was approaching the water's edge, he followed her, and again asked her what she wanted t At this time she appeared to be praying, and did not reply to him for some moments when she drew a letter from her bosom, and re- quested he would put it into the Post Office. She then said that her lover had jumped off London Bridge on Sunday or Monday Dtght, and that be hoped she would do the same. She then made towards the edge of the water, and was in the act of throwing herself in when witness caught hold of bar elothes, and held her SLman cm*'tnd.,h« w,» b«ded over to the care of the policeman. The witness added that after aav.ng her, the pnsoner told him he was very unkind to interfere with her,and asked him several times to let her do what she wanted but she appeared in a state of distraction at the time. According to the girl's ac- count, she had been seduced from her father's home by a Mr. B., the son of wealthy parenta, under pretence of having got a license to marry. He brought bar to London and took her to Mother H.'s, but could not effect his purpose. Hathen at. tempted to poison her, end afterwards robbed her of her watch and rings, writing her that he had thrown himself off London Bridge, and advised her to do the same. She was consigned to the care of the police till further inquiry can be made. ARTIFICIAL TEETH .—The attention of those who have lost their teeth, is especially directed to the following observations The extraction of the few teeth or roots which may remain in the mouth is insisted upon by many dentiats, previously 10 preparing artificial teeth. Thia ia not neceasary, aa by Mr. Fhomaa a improved method they can be fixed in the mouth with the greetest accuracy answering most fully every purpose of arti- culation and mastication and so perfectly natural in appearaoce as to defy detection by the closest observer, without extracting any teeth or stumps, or giving any pain whatever. The new Incorrodible Teeth invented by Mr. Thomas, Surgeon Dentist, C4, Beroers-street, Oxford-street, London, will be found much moft economical than most others.