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I P HIGH WATER \T NEWPORT.…

- ----WEEKLY CALENDAR. -I

THE REGIUM DONUM.

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THE REGIUM DONUM. This payment is so little understood, and such confused notions are entertained with respect to it, that a few words of explanation may be useful; and particularly as it has been so often mentioned in the Maynooth Bill discussions, and will yet be brought in question in the debates in various places, upon the voluntary principle, which are obviously destined to be more frequent than heretofore. In the first place, it is necessary to observe that the grant made under this name in Ireland is quite distinct in its origin, as well as widely different in its amount, from that made in England. Indeed, the term is often used in Parliament, with exclu- sive reference to the former. During the Protectorate, a number of Presby- terians were in possession of Tithes in Ireland. At the restoration of Charles II, they were de- prived of these Tithes by the Legislature. It was, however, therefore, politic to give them some compensation and it was deemed judicious to grant this, npt as a permanent right, but as a matter of favour, and paid out of the King's property; and hence its name, "Royal Gift." When the hereditary revenues of the crown were surrendered to the public service, and the Civil List" granted instead, this payment became chargeable upon the consolidated fund, and is every year rated with the supplies. It is granted to Presbyterian Ministers, on application from householders attending their ministry, and is pro- portioned in amount to their congregations. Its present amount is nearly 935,000. The English Regium Donum was originally a grant from the privy purse of the Sovereign, to refugee Protestant Ministers, banished from Catholic countries in consequence of their religion. As persecution on the Continent diminished, of course the necessity for such a provision decreased also. But, in the reign of George II, when the Stuarts were endeavouring to regain the throne of their ancestors, and when Protestantism and loyalty to the reigning Monarch were represented as synonimous, the Protestant Dissenters, then comparatively few in number, warmly supported the King, and he, in return, directed the sum of 91,600. to be paid annually to poor Ministers of what are called the Three Denominations," viz., the Presbyterians, Independents, and Baptists. The principal dissenting bodies have long pro- tested against this grant, as inconsistent with the voluntary principle; and it has been proposed to pension off the present recipients but it would be difficult so long as Government offered it, to prevent new claimants from arising. +

LOCAL COURTS.

LORD RADNOR'S POST OFFICE…

OUR TRADE WITH CANADA AND…

THE CUKREN CX_, .--

SCENE IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS…

SECOND READING OF THE MAYNOOTH…

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

NEWPORT AND PONTYPOOL RAILWAY.

MONMOUTH.

ABERGAVENNY.

POLICE INTELLIGENCE.

TOWN-HALL, NEWPORT.—MONDAY,…

THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1845.

CARDIFF POLICE.—SATURDAY,…

MONDAY.—JUNE 2,

THURSDAY.—JUNE 5.

----I The late Fire and loss…

Fire and Loss of Life in Fenchurch-street.

HOUSE OF LORDS.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

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.d'-The New Barracks, at Bristol.

S P 0 R TIN G.

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